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Open AccessArticle

Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels Water Extract on RAW 264.7 Induced with Lipopolysaccharide

College of Korean Medicine, Gachon University, Seong-nam 13120, Korea
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Nutrients 2018, 10(5), 647; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050647
Received: 8 March 2018 / Revised: 13 May 2018 / Accepted: 16 May 2018 / Published: 21 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammation- An Ancient Battle. What are the Roles of Nutrients?)
The dry root of Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels, also known as “female ginseng”, is a popular herbal drug amongst women, used to treat a variety of health issues and cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study is to evaluate the detailed molecular mechanism for anti-inflammatory effects of Angelica sinensis root water extract (ASW). The anti-inflammatory effect of ASW on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages was evaluated by the tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay (MTT), Griess reagent assay, multiplex cytokine assay, real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and Fluo-4 calcium assay. ASW restored cell viability in RAW 264.7 at concentrations of up to 200 µg/mL. ASW showed notable anti-inflammatory effects. ASW exhibited IC50 = 954.3, 387.3, 191.7, 317.8, 1267.0, 347.0, 110.1, 573.6, 1171.0, 732.6, 980.8, 125.0, and 257.0 µg/mL for interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, monocyte chemotactic activating factor (MCP)-1, regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), lipopolysaccharide-induced CXC chemokine (LIX), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, MIP-1β, MIP-2, IL-10, and intracellular calcium, respectively. Additionally, ASW inhibited the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide and the LPS-induced mRNA expression of CHOP (GADD153), Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1), first apoptosis signal receptor (FAS), and c-Fos, NOS2, and PTGS2 (COX2) in RAW 264.7 significantly (p < 0.05). Data suggest that ASW exerts an anti-inflammatory effect on LPS-induced RAW 264.7 via NO-bursting/calcium-mediated JAK-STAT pathway. View Full-Text
Keywords: Angelica sinensis; anti-inflammatory; macrophage; cytokine; calcium; nitric oxide; JAK-STAT Angelica sinensis; anti-inflammatory; macrophage; cytokine; calcium; nitric oxide; JAK-STAT
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Kim, Y.-J.; Lee, J.Y.; Kim, H.-J.; Kim, D.-H.; Lee, T.H.; Kang, M.S.; Park, W. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels Water Extract on RAW 264.7 Induced with Lipopolysaccharide. Nutrients 2018, 10, 647.

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