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Article

Transition to a Sustainable Circular Plastics Economy in The Netherlands: Discourse and Policy Analysis

1
Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, 3508 TC Utrecht, The Netherlands
2
Department of Economics, University of Messina, 98122 Messina, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Marina De Pádua Pieroni, Mariia Kravchenko, Daniela C. A. Pigosso and Tim C. McAloone
Sustainability 2022, 14(1), 190; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14010190
Received: 5 November 2021 / Revised: 17 December 2021 / Accepted: 20 December 2021 / Published: 24 December 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Circular Economy for Sustainable Development)
The circular economy (CE) has become a key sustainability discourse in the last decade. The Netherlands seeks to become fully circular by 2050 and the EU has set ambitious circularity targets in its CE Action Plan of 2015. The plastics sector, in particular, has gained a lot of attention as it is a priority area of both the EU and Dutch CE policies. However, there has been little research on the different and often contested discourses, governance processes and policy mechanisms guiding the transition to a circular economy and society. This paper aims to fill these gaps by asking what circular discourses and policies are being promoted in the Netherlands and what sustainability implications and recommendations can be drawn from it. It does so through a mix of media analysis, policy analysis, semi-structured interviews, and surveys using Q-methodology. Results indicate a dominance of technocentric imaginaries, and a general lack of discussion on holistic, and transformative visions, which integrate the full social, political, and ecological implication of a circular future. To address those challenges, this research brings key policy insights and recommendations which can help both academics and practitioners better understand and implement the transition towards a sustainable circular plastics economy. View Full-Text
Keywords: circular economy; plastics; circular society; policy analysis; discourse analysis; extended producer responsibility; polymer; recycling; environmental governance; sustainability circular economy; plastics; circular society; policy analysis; discourse analysis; extended producer responsibility; polymer; recycling; environmental governance; sustainability
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MDPI and ACS Style

Calisto Friant, M.; Lakerveld, D.; Vermeulen, W.J.V.; Salomone, R. Transition to a Sustainable Circular Plastics Economy in The Netherlands: Discourse and Policy Analysis. Sustainability 2022, 14, 190. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14010190

AMA Style

Calisto Friant M, Lakerveld D, Vermeulen WJV, Salomone R. Transition to a Sustainable Circular Plastics Economy in The Netherlands: Discourse and Policy Analysis. Sustainability. 2022; 14(1):190. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14010190

Chicago/Turabian Style

Calisto Friant, Martin, Dirkjan Lakerveld, Walter J.V. Vermeulen, and Roberta Salomone. 2022. "Transition to a Sustainable Circular Plastics Economy in The Netherlands: Discourse and Policy Analysis" Sustainability 14, no. 1: 190. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14010190

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