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Open AccessArticle

Gender-Typed Sport Practice, Physical Self-Perceptions, and Performance-Related Emotions in Adolescent Girls

1
Parisi-De Sanctis Institute, MIUR (Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research), 71121 Foggia, Italy
2
School of Medicine and Health Sciences, “G. d’Annunzio” University of Chieti-Pescara, 66013 Chieti, Italy
3
BIND-Behavioral Imaging and Neural Dynamics Center, Department of Medicine and Aging Sciences, “G. d’Annunzio” University of Chieti-Pescara, 66013 Chieti, Italy
4
Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, 40014 Jyväskylä, Finland
5
Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Neurosciences and Sense Organs School of Medicine, Aldo Moro University, 70123 Bari, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(20), 8518; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12208518
Received: 23 September 2020 / Revised: 10 October 2020 / Accepted: 13 October 2020 / Published: 15 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sport Psychology and Sustainable Health and Well-being)
Youth sport experience provides opportunities for physical, personal, and social development in youngsters. Sport is a social system in which socially constructed gender differences and stereotypes are incorporated, and specific sport activities are often perceived as gender characterized. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between some salient physical and emotional self-perceptions and the type of sport practiced. A sample of 261 female athletes, aged 14–21 years (Mage = 15.59, SD = 2.00), practicing different sports, categorized as feminine (e.g., artistic and rhythmic gymnastics), masculine (e.g., soccer and rugby), or neutral (e.g., track and field and tennis), took part in a cross-sectional study. Significant differences were observed between aesthetic sports and other types of sports. Athletes involved in aesthetic sports reported the lowest values in their feelings of confidence and the highest values in feelings of worry related to competition. This may be attributed to the evaluation system of aesthetic sports, in which the athlete’s performance is evaluated by a jury. At the same time, they reported low values of dysfunctional psychobiosocial states associated with their general sport experience, likely because of their physical appearance close to the current body social standards for girls. Notwithstanding the differences by type of sport, athletes of all disciplines reported high mean values of functional psychobiosocial states, suggesting that their overall sporting experience was good. View Full-Text
Keywords: physical self-perception; body dissatisfaction; social physique anxiety; psychobiosocial states; aesthetic sports; feminine sports; masculine sports physical self-perception; body dissatisfaction; social physique anxiety; psychobiosocial states; aesthetic sports; feminine sports; masculine sports
MDPI and ACS Style

Morano, M.; Robazza, C.; Ruiz, M.C.; Cataldi, S.; Fischetti, F.; Bortoli, L. Gender-Typed Sport Practice, Physical Self-Perceptions, and Performance-Related Emotions in Adolescent Girls. Sustainability 2020, 12, 8518.

AMA Style

Morano M, Robazza C, Ruiz MC, Cataldi S, Fischetti F, Bortoli L. Gender-Typed Sport Practice, Physical Self-Perceptions, and Performance-Related Emotions in Adolescent Girls. Sustainability. 2020; 12(20):8518.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Morano, Milena; Robazza, Claudio; Ruiz, Montse C.; Cataldi, Stefania; Fischetti, Francesco; Bortoli, Laura. 2020. "Gender-Typed Sport Practice, Physical Self-Perceptions, and Performance-Related Emotions in Adolescent Girls" Sustainability 12, no. 20: 8518.

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