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Article

Mechanical Behavior of a Composite Lightweight Slab, Consisting of a Laminated Wooden Joist and Ecological Mortar

Department of Construction, University of Burgos, Calle Villadiego s/n, 09001 Burgos, Spain
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Materials 2020, 13(11), 2575; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13112575
Received: 5 May 2020 / Revised: 1 June 2020 / Accepted: 3 June 2020 / Published: 5 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Research in the Design of New Sustainable Building Materials)
The investigation reported in this paper is an evaluation of the mechanical behavior of full-scale ecological mortar slabs manufactured with a mixture of expanded clay and recycled concrete aggregates. The composite mortars form a compressive layer over laminated wooden joists to form a single construction unit. To do so, full-scale flexural tests are conducted of the composite laminated wood-ecological mortar slabs with different types of mortar designs: reference mortar (MR), lightweight mortar dosed with recycled concrete aggregates (MLC), and lightweight mortar dosed with recycled mixed aggregates (MLM). The test results showed that the mortar forming the compression layer and the laminated wooden joists worked in unison and withstood a higher maximum failure load under flexion than the failure load of the wooden joists in isolation. Moreover, the laboratory test results were compared with the simulated values of the theoretical model, generated in accordance with the technical specifications for structural calculations contained in the Spanish building code, and with the results calculated by a computer software package. From the analysis of the results of the calculation methods and the full-scale laboratory test results, it was concluded that the safety margin yielded by the calculations validated the use of those methods on this type of composite slab. In this way, a strong mixed wood–mortar slab was designed, contributing little dead-load to the building structure and its manufacture with recycled aggregate, also contributes to the circular economy of construction materials. View Full-Text
Keywords: wooden joist; mechanical behavior; full-scale flexural test; lightweight mortar; expanded clay; recycled concrete aggregates (RCA); recycled mixed aggregates (RMA) wooden joist; mechanical behavior; full-scale flexural test; lightweight mortar; expanded clay; recycled concrete aggregates (RCA); recycled mixed aggregates (RMA)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Muñoz-Ruiperez, C.; Fiol Oliván, F.; Calderón Carpintero, V.; Santamaría-Vicario, I.; Rodríguez Sáiz, Á. Mechanical Behavior of a Composite Lightweight Slab, Consisting of a Laminated Wooden Joist and Ecological Mortar. Materials 2020, 13, 2575. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13112575

AMA Style

Muñoz-Ruiperez C, Fiol Oliván F, Calderón Carpintero V, Santamaría-Vicario I, Rodríguez Sáiz Á. Mechanical Behavior of a Composite Lightweight Slab, Consisting of a Laminated Wooden Joist and Ecological Mortar. Materials. 2020; 13(11):2575. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13112575

Chicago/Turabian Style

Muñoz-Ruiperez, Carmelo, Francisco Fiol Oliván, Verónica Calderón Carpintero, Isabel Santamaría-Vicario, and Ángel Rodríguez Sáiz. 2020. "Mechanical Behavior of a Composite Lightweight Slab, Consisting of a Laminated Wooden Joist and Ecological Mortar" Materials 13, no. 11: 2575. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13112575

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