Next Article in Journal
Mesothelioma in Agriculture in Lombardy, Italy: An Unrecognized Risk
Previous Article in Journal
Complementary Methods in Cancer Treatment—Cure or Curse?
Open AccessArticle

Patterns of Red and Processed Meat Consumption across North America: A Nationally Representative Cross-Sectional Comparison of Dietary Recalls from Canada, Mexico, and the United States

1
Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27516, USA
2
Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
3
Global Academy of Agriculture and Food Security, Easter Bush Campus, The University of Edinburgh, Roslin EH25 9RG, UK
4
CONACYT—Health and Nutrition Research Center, National Institute of Public Health, Av. Universidad No. 655 Colonia Santa María Ahuacatitlán, Cuernavaca 62100, Mexico
5
Centre Nutrition, Santé et Société (NUTRISS), L’École de Nutrition, Université Laval, Quebec City, QC GIV 0A6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 357; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010357
Received: 17 November 2020 / Revised: 18 December 2020 / Accepted: 20 December 2020 / Published: 5 January 2021
Close economic ties encourage production and trade of meat between Canada, Mexico, and the US. Understanding the patterns of red and processed meat consumption in North America may inform policies designed to reduce meat consumption and bolster environmental and public health efforts across the continent. We used nationally-representative cross-sectional survey data to analyze consumption of unprocessed red meat; processed meat; and total red and processed meat. Generalized linear models were used to separately estimate probability of consumption and adjusted mean intake. Prevalence of total meat consumers was higher in the US (73.6, 95% CI: 72.3–74.8%) than in Canada (65.6, 63.9–67.2%) or Mexico (62.7, 58.1–67.2%). Men were more likely to consume unprocessed red, processed, and total meat, and had larger estimated intakes. In Mexico, high wealth individuals were more likely to consume all three categories of meat. In the US and Canada, those with high education were less likely to consume total and processed meat. Estimated mean intake of unprocessed red, processed, and total meat did not differ across sociodemographic strata. Overall consumption of red and processed meat remains high in North America. Policies to reduce meat consumption are appropriate for all three countries. View Full-Text
Keywords: consumer behavior; nutrition policy; meat; diet surveys; environment and public health; cross-sectional study; socioeconomic factors; Canada; Mexico; United States consumer behavior; nutrition policy; meat; diet surveys; environment and public health; cross-sectional study; socioeconomic factors; Canada; Mexico; United States
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Frank, S.M.; Jaacks, L.M.; Batis, C.; Vanderlee, L.; Taillie, L.S. Patterns of Red and Processed Meat Consumption across North America: A Nationally Representative Cross-Sectional Comparison of Dietary Recalls from Canada, Mexico, and the United States. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 357. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010357

AMA Style

Frank SM, Jaacks LM, Batis C, Vanderlee L, Taillie LS. Patterns of Red and Processed Meat Consumption across North America: A Nationally Representative Cross-Sectional Comparison of Dietary Recalls from Canada, Mexico, and the United States. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(1):357. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010357

Chicago/Turabian Style

Frank, Sarah M.; Jaacks, Lindsay M.; Batis, Carolina; Vanderlee, Lana; Taillie, Lindsey S. 2021. "Patterns of Red and Processed Meat Consumption across North America: A Nationally Representative Cross-Sectional Comparison of Dietary Recalls from Canada, Mexico, and the United States" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 1: 357. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010357

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop