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Article

Risk of Falling in a Timed Up and Go Test Using an UWB Radar and an Instrumented Insole

1
Communications and Microelectronic Integration Laboratory (LACIME), Department of Electrical Engineering, École de Technologie Supérieure, 1100 Rue Notre-Dame Ouest, Montréal, QC H3C 1K3, Canada
2
Laboratory of Automation and Robotic Interaction (LAR.i), Department of Applied Science, University of Quebec at Chicoutimi, 555 Blvd of University, Chicoutimi, QC G7H 2B1, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2021, 21(3), 722; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21030722
Received: 4 December 2020 / Revised: 16 January 2021 / Accepted: 18 January 2021 / Published: 21 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Intelligent Sensors)
Previously, studies reported that falls analysis is possible in the elderly, when using wearable sensors. However, these devices cannot be worn daily, as they need to be removed and recharged from time-to-time due to their energy consumption, data transfer, attachment to the body, etc. This study proposes to introduce a radar sensor, an unobtrusive technology, for risk of falling analysis and combine its performance with an instrumented insole. We evaluated our methods on datasets acquired during a Timed Up and Go (TUG) test where a stride length (SL) was computed by the insole using three approaches. Only the SL from the third approach was not statistically significant (p = 0.2083 > 0.05) compared to the one provided by the radar, revealing the importance of a sensor location on human body. While reducing the number of force sensors (FSR), the risk scores using an insole containing three FSRs and y-axis of acceleration were not significantly different (p > 0.05) compared to the combination of a single radar and two FSRs. We concluded that contactless TUG testing is feasible, and by supplementing the instrumented insole to the radar, more precise information could be available for the professionals to make accurate decision. View Full-Text
Keywords: fall detection; biomedical monitoring; TUG; UWB radar; gait parameters; non-contact fall detection; biomedical monitoring; TUG; UWB radar; gait parameters; non-contact
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ayena, J.C.; Chioukh, L.; Otis, M.J.-D.; Deslandes, D. Risk of Falling in a Timed Up and Go Test Using an UWB Radar and an Instrumented Insole. Sensors 2021, 21, 722. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21030722

AMA Style

Ayena JC, Chioukh L, Otis MJ-D, Deslandes D. Risk of Falling in a Timed Up and Go Test Using an UWB Radar and an Instrumented Insole. Sensors. 2021; 21(3):722. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21030722

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ayena, Johannes C.; Chioukh, Lydia; Otis, Martin J.-D.; Deslandes, Dominic. 2021. "Risk of Falling in a Timed Up and Go Test Using an UWB Radar and an Instrumented Insole" Sensors 21, no. 3: 722. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21030722

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