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Open AccessArticle

Effect of Long-Term Brushing on Deflection, Maximum Load, and Wear of Stainless Steel Wires and Conventional and Spot Bonded Fiber-Reinforced Composites

1
Unit of Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry, Section of Dentistry, Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Paediatric Sciences, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
2
Department of Biomaterial Science and Turku Clinical Biomaterials Centre (TCBC), Institute of Dentistry, University of Turku, 20100 Turku, Finland
3
Welfare Division, 20100 Turku, Finland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(23), 6043; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20236043
Received: 2 November 2019 / Revised: 27 November 2019 / Accepted: 28 November 2019 / Published: 30 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Polymer Composite Materials)
Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) retainers are an aesthetic alternative to conventional Stainless Steel splints. They are generally used with a full bonded technique, but some studies demonstrated that they could be managed with a spot bonding technique to significantly decrease their rigidity. In order to propose this FRC spot bonding technique for clinical use, the aim of this study was to evaluate mechanical properties and surface wear of fibers left uncovered. Tests were made by simulating tooth brushing, comparing FRC spot bonding technique splints with stainless steel and FRC traditional technique splints. Specimens were tested both at 0.1 mm of deflection and at maximum load, showing higher values of rigidity for the FRC full bonded technique. After tooth brushing, no significant reduction in values at 0.1 mm deflection was reported, while we found a similar reduction in these values for the Stainless Steel and FRC spot bonding technique at maximum load, and no significant variation for the FRC full bonded technique. SEM images after tooth brushing showed wear for FRC fibers left uncovered, while no relevant wear signs in metal and conventional FRC fibers were noticed. Results showed that FRC spot bonding technique has advantages in mechanical properties when compared to the FRC traditional full bonding technique, also after tooth brushing. However, the surface wear after tooth brushing in the FRC spot bonding technique is considerable and other tests must be performed before promoting this technique for routine clinical use. View Full-Text
Keywords: fiber; reinforced; composite; FRC; bonding; technique; spot; load; mechanical; deflection; brushing; wear fiber; reinforced; composite; FRC; bonding; technique; spot; load; mechanical; deflection; brushing; wear
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MDPI and ACS Style

Scribante, A.; Vallittu, P.; Lassila, L.V.J.; Viola, A.; Tessera, P.; Gandini, P.; Sfondrini, M.F. Effect of Long-Term Brushing on Deflection, Maximum Load, and Wear of Stainless Steel Wires and Conventional and Spot Bonded Fiber-Reinforced Composites. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 6043.

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