Topic Editors

Department of Horticulture, Agriculture Faculty, Bursa Uludag University, 16059 Bursa, Turkey
Grapevine Pathogen Systems Lab, Biosystems and Integrative Sciences Institute, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa, Portugal
Department of Environmental Biology, University of Navarra, 31008 Pamplona, Spain
Investigador Científico, Instituto de Agrobiotecnología, CSIC-Gobierno de Navarra, Mutilva, Spain

Effects of Climate Change on Viticulture (Grape)

Abstract submission deadline
30 September 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
31 December 2024
Viewed by
3559

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change has many negative effects many countries economic sectors and viticulture is no exception. Temperature, drought, heat waves, new emerging diseases are some of the effects of climate change that negative impact in both on plant growth and product quality. Within the abiotic factors, drought stress is one of the major challenges, increasing the need to develop water stress resistant plants as well as new strategies (eg tailoring vineyard microbiome) to increase plant access to water. Climate change shows its impact in many different ways, within biotic stress, new emerging diseases as well as new outbreaks of well-established diseases create new challenges for viticulture, particularly when the reduction of pesticide application in the vineyards is a demand. Viticulture is one of the most polluting industries and thus the development of disease tolerant crossing hybrids, the identification of new molecules that prime grapevine immunity as well as the development of regenerative agriculture pratices are crucial New varieties that can adapt to changing climatic conditions urgently need to be developed with the help of modern techniques. However, in these studies, there is a need to develop stress-resistant species and varieties, rather than transgenic varieties, with marker-based selection and other identification techniques, paying attention to ethical issues as much as possible. In addition, in accordance with the increasing environmental and human health awareness, it is necessary to realize all these in accordance with the sustainable agriculture model.

Dr. Arif Atak
Dr. Andreia Figueiredo
Dr. Inmaculada Pascual
Dr. Fermin Morales
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • climate change
  • Vitis spp.
  • stress factors
  • sustainable agriculture
  • biotechnology

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Agronomy
agronomy
3.7 5.2 2011 15.8 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Horticulturae
horticulturae
3.1 2.4 2015 14.7 Days CHF 2200 Submit
International Journal of Plant Biology
ijpb
- 1.1 2010 14.4 Days CHF 1200 Submit
Life
life
3.2 2.7 2011 17.5 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Plants
plants
4.5 5.4 2012 15.3 Days CHF 2700 Submit

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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17 pages, 2133 KiB  
Article
Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Improve the Performance of Tempranillo and Cabernet Sauvignon Facing Water Deficit under Current and Future Climatic Conditions
by Daria Kozikova, Inmaculada Pascual and Nieves Goicoechea
Plants 2024, 13(8), 1155; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13081155 - 22 Apr 2024
Viewed by 255
Abstract
Climate change (CC) threatens Mediterranean viticulture. Rhizospheric microorganisms may be crucial for the adaptation of plants to CC. Our objective was to assess whether the association of two grapevine varieties with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) increases grapevine’s resilience to environmental conditions that combine [...] Read more.
Climate change (CC) threatens Mediterranean viticulture. Rhizospheric microorganisms may be crucial for the adaptation of plants to CC. Our objective was to assess whether the association of two grapevine varieties with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) increases grapevine’s resilience to environmental conditions that combine elevated atmospheric CO2, increased air temperatures, and water deficit. Tempranillo (T) and Cabernet Sauvignon (CS) plants, grafted onto R110 rootstocks, either inoculated (+M) or not (−M) with AMF, were grown in temperature-gradient greenhouses under two environmental conditions: (i) current conditions (ca. 400 ppm air CO2 concentration plus ambient air temperature, CATA) and (ii) climate change conditions predicted by the year 2100 (700 ppm of CO2 plus ambient air temperature +4 °C, CETE). From veraison to maturity, for plants of each variety, inoculation treatment and environmental conditions were also subjected to two levels of water availability: full irrigation (WW) or drought cycles (D). Therefore, the number of treatments applied to each grapevine variety was eight, resulting from the combination of two inoculation treatments (+M and −M), two environmental conditions (CATA and CETE), and two water availabilities (WW and D). In both grapevine varieties, early drought decreased leaf conductance and transpiration under both CATA and CETE conditions and more markedly in +M plants. Photosynthesis did not decrease very much, so the instantaneous water use efficiency (WUE) increased, especially in drought +M plants under CETE conditions. The increase in WUE coincided with a lower intercellular-to-atmospheric CO2 concentration ratio and reduced plant hydraulic conductance. In the long term, mycorrhization induced changes in the stomatal anatomy under water deficit and CETE conditions: density increased in T and decreased in CS, with smaller stomata in the latter. Although some responses were genotype-dependent, the interaction of the rootstock with AMF appeared to be a key factor in the acclimation of the grapevine to water deficit under both current and future CO2 and temperature conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Effects of Climate Change on Viticulture (Grape))
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15 pages, 5244 KiB  
Article
Structural and Spatial Shifts in the Viticulture Potential of Main European Wine Regions as an Effect of Climate Change
by Liviu Mihai Irimia, Cristian Valeriu Patriche, Théo Petitjean, Cyril Tissot, Luis Gonzaga Santesteban, Etienne Neethling, Chris Foss, Renan Le Roux and Hervé Quénol
Horticulturae 2024, 10(4), 413; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae10040413 - 19 Apr 2024
Viewed by 258
Abstract
Climate change modifies the base climate of the wine regions and, with it, the structure of their traditional types of wine production, imposing measures to adapt, mitigate, or capitalize on the newly emerging conditions. In order to assess the impact of climate change [...] Read more.
Climate change modifies the base climate of the wine regions and, with it, the structure of their traditional types of wine production, imposing measures to adapt, mitigate, or capitalize on the newly emerging conditions. In order to assess the impact of climate change and establish the appropriate adaptation measures for each wine region, regional and local studies are needed, which allow knowledge of their current climate profile. The aim of this research was to identify the changes that appeared as an effect of climate change in the initial climate profile and the initial structure of the traditional types of wine production of Bordeaux (France), Loire Valley (France), Rhine-Main-Nahe (Germany), La Rioja (Spain) and Cotnari (Romania) wine regions, and also in climate suitability for wine production of the Sussex area from the UK. The study uses multi-year averages for the 1951–1990 and 1991–2010 time periods of reference bioclimatic indices for viticulture, namely the Average Temperature of the Growing Season (AvGST), the Huglin Index (HI), and the Oenoclimatic Aptitude Index (IAOe). The results of this research reveal significant changes in climate suitability for wine production of the studied wine regions: in the Bordeaux wine region, climate change led to the appearance of conditions for the cultivation of the Mediterranean climate varieties Grenache, Syrah, and Carignan; in the cool climate wine regions Rhine-Main-Nahe and Cotnari, traditional producers of white wines, the climate has also become suitable for the cultivation of Pinot noir and Cabernet franc varieties, and implicitly for the production of red wines; in all studied wine regions, the classes of climate suitability for viticulture shifted higher in altitude, as is the case of the La Rioja region, where, in the recent period, the grapevine can be grown up to 922.9 m asl, higher by 206.2 m compared to the 1951–1990 time period; in the low area of each wine region, one or even two new climate suitability classes for wine grape growing appeared. The shifts revealed by this research generate solid conclusions regarding the effect of climatic change on the viticultural potential of geographical areas, namely: in the context of climate change, the altitude of the wine region has a major influence on the evolution of the local viticulture potential; a higher topography allows a better adaptation of the wine region to climate change; low-elevation wine regions are more vulnerable to climate changes, especially the further south they are located; as an effect of climate change, conditions appear in the wine regions for the cultivation of new grapevine varieties and the production of new types of wine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Effects of Climate Change on Viticulture (Grape))
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24 pages, 11819 KiB  
Review
Effects of Global Warming on Grapevine Berries Phenolic Compounds—A Review
by Eleonora Cataldo, Aleš Eichmeier and Giovan Battista Mattii
Agronomy 2023, 13(9), 2192; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13092192 - 22 Aug 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2126
Abstract
The steadfast propensity to global warming has had a severe impact on overall viticulture. Given the observed increase in growing season temperatures in Europe (+1.7 °C from 1950 to 2004), between 2000 and 2049, it is assumed that temperatures for major wine regions [...] Read more.
The steadfast propensity to global warming has had a severe impact on overall viticulture. Given the observed increase in growing season temperatures in Europe (+1.7 °C from 1950 to 2004), between 2000 and 2049, it is assumed that temperatures for major wine regions will increase on average by about +0.42 °C per decade and will generally increase by +2.04 °C. Phenolic compound development is affected by environmental parameters such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation, sunlight, maximum and minimum temperatures, and grapevine water status. Proanthocyanidins, flavan-3-ol monomers, and other pigmented polymers are impacted by soil management and canopy handling strategies, as well as obtaining a microclimate around the developing bunch. This review, after a necessary summary of the synthesis of phenolic compounds in the berry (flavonoids and non-flavonoids) to let the lector delve into the topic, describes the impact of climate change and therefore of environmental factors on their accumulation and storage throughout ripening and harvesting. For example, high berry temperatures can reduce the total concentrations of skin anthocyanin; a 35 °C temperature entirely obstructed anthocyanin synthesis, and instead quercetin 3-glucoside could be enhanced with exposure to solar radiation. In addition, increments via water deficit in the relative abundance of methoxylated anthocyanins were also found. The vineyard management strategies to mitigate the degradation of phenolic compounds and preserve their concentration are also further discussed. Finally, it is believed that it is necessary today to establish an elastic and variable approach towards the single wine year, moving away from the concept of product standardization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Effects of Climate Change on Viticulture (Grape))
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