Topic Editors

School of Science and Technology, University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino, Italy
Department of Chemical Engineering Materials Environment (DICMA), Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy

Effects of Climate Change on Geomorphology, Water Geochemistry and Pollution

Abstract submission deadline
closed (31 March 2024)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (31 May 2024)
Viewed by
1975

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change can have numerous repercussions that are not always thoroughly identified and investigated. In this context, there is a need to assess climate change and, if necessary, atmospheric circulation as a function of changes attributable to cross-cutting themes ranging from geomorphology to water geochemistry and public health. In particular, it is interesting to analyse the influence of climate change and atmospheric circulation in relation to aridity with particular attention to erosive processes also analysed using remote sensing techniques. In addition, this SI aims to evaluate the effects of changes in temperature, precipitation, humidity, wind, etc., on the chemistry of water resources, as well as in relation to pollution by assessing whether it can be favoured by changes in climatic factors. Lastly, we would like to emphasise the transversal nature of the topics dealt with, in order to be able to understand the effects of climate change in the broadest possible way, assessing the effects on human health, also in relation to the increased circulation of infectious agents and the appearance of new pathogens due to changed climatic conditions. The goal of this Topic is to collect papers to provide insights on the effects of climate change, on various issues such as geomorphological modifications, changes in water geochemistry and water pollution, as well as the effect of climate on human health.

This Topic will welcome manuscripts that link the following themes:

  • Impact of climate change on water geochemistry;
  • Effects of climate change on geomorphological dynamics;
  • Analysis of the relationship between pollution and climate change;
  • Assessment of radioactive pollution in water due to climate change;
  • Interactions between climate change and human health;
  • Spatial statistical models that can predict the effects of climate change at a geomorphological and geochemical level.

We look forward to receiving your original research articles and reviews.

Dr. Matteo Gentilucci
Prof. Dr. Maurizio Barbieri
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • climate change
  • water geochemistry
  • erosion
  • aridity
  • human health
  • water pollution
  • geomorphology
  • radioactive pollution

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Climate
climate
3.0 5.5 2013 19.7 Days CHF 1800
Earth
earth
2.1 3.3 2020 17.6 Days CHF 1200
Land
land
3.2 4.9 2012 14.8 Days CHF 2600
Remote Sensing
remotesensing
4.2 8.3 2009 23 Days CHF 2700
Water
water
3.0 5.8 2009 16.5 Days CHF 2600

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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16 pages, 5009 KiB  
Article
Using Google Earth Engine to Assess the Current State of Thermokarst Terrain on Arga Island (the Lena Delta)
by Andrei Kartoziia
Earth 2024, 5(2), 228-243; https://doi.org/10.3390/earth5020012 - 12 Jun 2024
Viewed by 425
Abstract
The mapping of thermokarst landscapes and the assessment of their conditions are becoming increasingly important in light of a rising global temperature. Land cover maps provide a basis for quantifying changes in landscapes and identifying areas that are vulnerable to permafrost degradation. The [...] Read more.
The mapping of thermokarst landscapes and the assessment of their conditions are becoming increasingly important in light of a rising global temperature. Land cover maps provide a basis for quantifying changes in landscapes and identifying areas that are vulnerable to permafrost degradation. The study is devoted to assessing the current state of thermokarst terrain on Arga Island. We applied a random forests algorithm using the capabilities of the Google Earth Engine cloud platform for the supervised classification of the composite image. The analyzed composite consists of a Sentinel-2 image and a set of calculated indices. The study found that thermokarst-affected terrains occupy 35% of the total area, and stable terrains cover 29% at the time of image acquisition. The classifier has also mapped water bodies, slopes, and blowouts. The accuracy assessment revealed that the overall accuracy for all the different land cover classes was 98.34%. A set of other accuracy metrics also demonstrated a high level of performance. This study presents significant findings for assessing landscape changes in a region with unique environmental features. It also provides a potential basis for future interdisciplinary research and for predicting future thermokarst landscape changes in the Lena Delta area. Full article
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15 pages, 5244 KiB  
Article
Groundwater Temperature Stripes: A Simple Method to Communicate Groundwater Temperature Variations Due to Climate Change
by Manuela Lasagna, Elena Egidio and Domenico Antonio De Luca
Water 2024, 16(5), 717; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16050717 - 28 Feb 2024
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 931
Abstract
As our planet faces the complex challenges of global climate change, understanding and effectively communicating critical environmental indicators have become critical. This study explores the importance of reporting groundwater temperature data as a key component in understanding the broader implications of climate change [...] Read more.
As our planet faces the complex challenges of global climate change, understanding and effectively communicating critical environmental indicators have become critical. This study explores the importance of reporting groundwater temperature data as a key component in understanding the broader implications of climate change with the use of new graphical tools. More specifically, the use of the groundwater temperature (GWT) stripes and bi-plots of GWT anomalies vs. time was proposed. For an in-depth examination of this subject, monitoring wells situated in the Piedmont Po plain (NW Italy) were selected, with available daily groundwater temperature data dating back to 2010. All data refer to the groundwater of the shallow unconfined aquifer within alluvial deposits. From the analyses of both GWT stripes and the bi-plot of GWT anomalies vs. time, it was possible to identify a general increase in the positive anomaly, corresponding to an increase in GWT in time in almost all of the monitoring points of the Piedmont plain. Furthermore, the utilisation of GWT stripes demonstrated the capability to effectively portray the trend of the GWT data relative to a specific point in a readily understandable manner, facilitating easy interpretation, especially when communicating to a non-scientific audience. The findings underline the urgent need to improve GWT data search and communication strategies to disseminate valuable information to policy makers, researchers, and society. By illustrating the intricate interplay between groundwater temperature and climate change, this research aims to facilitate informed decision-making and promote a proactive approach towards climate resilience. Full article
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