Topic Editors

Department of Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy
1. Department of Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy
2. San Raffaele Cassino Hospital, 03043 Cassino, Italy
Dr. Alessandro Quaglieri
Department of Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy

New Advances in Addiction Behavior

Abstract submission deadline
20 December 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
20 February 2025
Viewed by
1084

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Addictions present a complex challenge, given that they involve crucial behavioral and psychological aspects. In the effort to address this, a large body of literature has highlighted the importance of unearthing the motivations underlying the development and maintenance of addictions, emphasizing the need for a dual approach that is both cognitive and emotional. In this context, interdisciplinary research emerges as a key element useful for understanding the topic of “addiction”, beginning with neuro-genetic, neuro-biological, neuro-psychological, and social roots.

The goal of this Topic is to highlight individualized prevention and intervention techniques in order to raise awareness, as well as prevent and challenge the development and maintenance of addiction with integrated and innovative approaches. As such, we welcome contributions related to the application of advanced technologies, such as artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML), that can advance the understanding of addiction-related behavioral patterns. Tools such as these will not only help identify early signs of addiction but also provide new approaches for personalized therapeutic intervention. 

Dr. Emanuela Mari
Dr. Laura Piccardi
Dr. Alessandro Quaglieri
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • behavioral addiction
  • substance addiction
  • disorder
  • prevention
  • psychopathology
  • personalized interventions
  • emotional dynamics
  • interdisciplinary research
  • artificial intelligence
  • machine learning

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Behavioral Sciences
behavsci
2.6 3.0 2011 21.5 Days CHF 2200 Submit
Brain Sciences
brainsci
3.3 3.9 2011 15.6 Days CHF 2200 Submit
European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education
ejihpe
3.2 3.5 2011 20.1 Days CHF 1400 Submit
Healthcare
healthcare
2.8 2.7 2013 19.5 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Journal of Clinical Medicine
jcm
3.9 5.4 2012 17.9 Days CHF 2600 Submit

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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12 pages, 259 KiB  
Perspective
Enhancing Substance Use Disorder Recovery through Integrated Physical Activity and Behavioral Interventions: A Comprehensive Approach to Treatment and Prevention
by Yannis Theodorakis, Mary Hassandra and Fotis Panagiotounis
Brain Sci. 2024, 14(6), 534; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci14060534 - 24 May 2024
Viewed by 184
Abstract
The global issue of substance abuse demands ongoing initiatives aligned with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. With drug use remaining prevalent worldwide, interventions are critical to addressing the associated health challenges and societal implications. Exercise and physical activities have emerged as integral [...] Read more.
The global issue of substance abuse demands ongoing initiatives aligned with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. With drug use remaining prevalent worldwide, interventions are critical to addressing the associated health challenges and societal implications. Exercise and physical activities have emerged as integral components of substance use disorder (SUD) treatment, offering promising avenues for prevention, intervention, and recovery. Recent research underscores the efficacy of exercise in reducing substance cravings, promoting abstinence, and improving overall well-being. However, integrating exercise into SUD recovery programs presents challenges such as dropout rates and cultural considerations. This paper synthesizes existing literature on exercise integration into SUD recovery, highlighting strategies for enhancing treatment outcomes and addressing barriers to exercise adherence. Drawing on cognitive–behavioral therapy, experiential learning, motivational interviewing, and goal-setting techniques, the holistic approach outlined in this paper aims to empower individuals both mentally and physically, fostering resilience and supporting long-term recovery. In conclusion, new initiatives need to be taken by advocating for inclusive policies, promoting community engagement, and fostering collaborations across sectors. By doing so, stakeholders can optimize the effectiveness of exercise programs and contribute to sustainable rehabilitation efforts for individuals with SUD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic New Advances in Addiction Behavior)
23 pages, 1553 KiB  
Article
Betting on Your Feelings: The Interplay between Emotion and Cognition in Gambling Affective Task
by Emanuela Mari, Clarissa Cricenti, Maddalena Boccia, Micaela Maria Zucchelli, Raffaella Nori, Laura Piccardi, Anna Maria Giannini and Alessandro Quaglieri
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(10), 2990; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13102990 - 19 May 2024
Viewed by 502
Abstract
Background: Gambling Disorder (GD) is a bio-psycho-social disorder resulting from the interaction of clinical, cognitive, and affective factors. Impulsivity is a crucial factor in addiction studies, as it is closely linked to cognitive distortions in GD by encompassing impulsive choices, motor responses, [...] Read more.
Background: Gambling Disorder (GD) is a bio-psycho-social disorder resulting from the interaction of clinical, cognitive, and affective factors. Impulsivity is a crucial factor in addiction studies, as it is closely linked to cognitive distortions in GD by encompassing impulsive choices, motor responses, decision-making, and cognitive biases. Also, emotions, mood, temperament, and affective state are crucial in developing and maintaining GD. Gambling can be used as a maladaptive coping strategy to avoid or escape problems and distress. Methods: The aim of the present study is to explore differences in personality traits and emotion regulation of people suffering from GD, substance-dependent gamblers (SDGs), and healthy controls (HCs). Additionally, the study proposes a new experimental task: the “Gambling Affective Task” (GAT) to investigate the influence of affective priming on risk-taking behaviors. Results: Our findings indicate that participants placed lower bets following positive priming. Additionally, SDGs wagered significantly higher amounts than HCs, regardless of priming type. In general, participants exhibited longer response times after positive priming trials, compared to negative and neutral priming trials. These findings suggest that experiencing positive emotions can act as a protective factor by delaying and lengthening gambling behaviors. By comparing gamblers with and without substance comorbidity, we can gain insight into the exclusive factors of GD and improve our understanding of this disorder. Conclusions: By elucidating the impact of emotional states on risk-taking, the research also provides new insights into the prevention and treatment of GD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic New Advances in Addiction Behavior)
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