Topic Editors

Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste (CIBNOR), Baja California Sur 23096, Mexico
Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada

Health Risk Assessment of the Trace and Macro Elements

Abstract submission deadline
30 June 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
30 August 2024
Viewed by
6941

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Several trace and macro elements are required to keep organisms alive. However, these can also represent a risk when their concentrations are higher than the levels needed to perform physiological functions. Furthermore, among species, the elements and doses that are essential for living can vary. These facts raise a number of questions: How does the concentration of different chemical elements vary spatially and temporally in the same species? How much of certain elements can a species tolerate? What damage or physiological responses does a species express from a lack or excess of a chemical element? How does an element biomagnify depending on the trophic chain that inhabits a site? Can we identify which elements are essential in some species but not in others? In addition, growing industrial activity needs high metal usage, which has resulted in significant mining around the world in recent years. As a result, the quantities of heavy metals such as arsenic, cadmium, and others in environmental contexts are rapidly growing. The majority of heavy metals accumulate in numerous aquatic pray species, causing death in other aquatic animals, as well as in humans.

This subject also includes study on heavy metal toxicity in environmental species, as well as human investigations. This Topic aims to provide an instrument for the discussion of recent advances in the identification of the factors that influence the accumulation of trace and macro elements among different species. Studies devoted to spatial and temporal analysis of trace and macro elements in marine and terrestrial environments are welcome.

Dr. Lía Celina Méndez-Rodríguez
Dr. Mahesh Rachamalla
Topic Editors

 

Keywords

  • marine environments
  • mineral distribution
  • metal excretion
  • metal physiology
  • pollution
  • contamination
  • marine biogeochemistry

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Animals
animals
3.0 4.2 2011 18.1 Days CHF 2400 Submit
Environments
environments
3.7 5.9 2014 23.7 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Journal of Marine Science and Engineering
jmse
2.9 3.7 2013 15.4 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Toxics
toxics
4.6 3.4 2013 14.7 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Water
water
3.4 5.5 2009 16.5 Days CHF 2600 Submit

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Published Papers (5 papers)

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21 pages, 13023 KiB  
Article
Ecotoxicology of Polymetallic Nodule Seabed Mining: The Effects of Cobalt and Nickel on Phytoplankton Growth and Pigment Concentration
by Rimei Ou, Hao Huang, Xuebao He, Shuangshuang Lin, Danyun Ou, Weiwen Li, Jinli Qiu and Lei Wang
Toxics 2023, 11(12), 1005; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics11121005 - 08 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1146
Abstract
In order to improve the understanding of the environmental impacts of polymetallic nodule mining, ecotoxicological studies were conducted on the growth of model phytoplankton species Skeletonema costatum and Prorocentrum donghaiense using cobalt and nickel. This study evaluated various physiological and ecological indicators, such [...] Read more.
In order to improve the understanding of the environmental impacts of polymetallic nodule mining, ecotoxicological studies were conducted on the growth of model phytoplankton species Skeletonema costatum and Prorocentrum donghaiense using cobalt and nickel. This study evaluated various physiological and ecological indicators, such as cell proliferation, chlorophyll a, pigments, total protein, and antioxidant enzyme markers. The results show that the introduction of low amounts of cobalt or nickel increased the growth rate of phytoplankton. The phytoplankton benefited from low concentrations of cobalt and nickel stress. The increased protein levels and decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes considerably impacted physiological responses during the promotion of cell abundance. High concentrations of cobalt or nickel resulted in decreased light-absorbing pigments, increased photoprotective pigments, an inactive chlorophyll content, decreased total proteins, and maximal antioxidant enzyme activity in phytoplankton. Throughout the experiment, both the phytoplankton protein and enzyme activity declined with prolonged stress, and the cells underwent age-induced damage. Thus, seabed mining’s repercussions on phytoplankton could result in both short-term growth promotion and long-term damage. These consequences depend on the impurity concentrations infiltrating the water, their duration, and the organism’s physiological responses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Health Risk Assessment of the Trace and Macro Elements)
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17 pages, 2801 KiB  
Article
The Accumulation of Toxic Elements (Pb, Hg, Cd, As, and Cu) in Red Swamp Crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) in Qianjiang and the Associated Risks to Human Health
by Lang Zhang, Ziwei Song, Yuntao Zhou, Shan Zhong, Yali Yu, Ting Liu, Xiaoping Gao, Lekang Li, Chiping Kong, Xinna Wang, Li He and Jinhua Gan
Toxics 2023, 11(7), 635; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics11070635 - 22 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1126
Abstract
Due to rapidly expanding crayfish consumption worldwide, the food safety of red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) is of great concern. China is the largest consumer and producer of crayfish globally. As of yet, it is unknown whether the main crayfish production [...] Read more.
Due to rapidly expanding crayfish consumption worldwide, the food safety of red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) is of great concern. China is the largest consumer and producer of crayfish globally. As of yet, it is unknown whether the main crayfish production cities in China are within safe levels of toxic heavy metals and metalloids. For 16 consecutive years, Qianjiang city ranked first in China in processing export volumes of red swamp crayfish. This study presents a comprehensive analysis of the enrichment levels and associated health risks of the species in Qianjiang. In our research, samples of four crayfish tissues, including the head, hepatopancreas, gills, and muscles, were collected from 38 sampling sites distributed in Qianjiang to evaluate the concentration levels of five heavy metals (Pb, Hg, Cd, As, and Cu). The concentration levels of all five metals in muscle did not surpass the national standard. Furthermore, eight significant correlations have been found. For further in-depth assess risk of crayfish in Qianjiang, estimated daily intake (EDI), target hazard quotient (THQ), carcinogenic risk (CR), and estimated maximum allowable consumption rates (CRmm) were evaluated in the abdomen muscle and hepatopancreas. The THQ values for each metal were found to be less than 1, while the CR values were below 10–6. Additionally, the CRmm for adults was determined to be 17.2 meals per month. These findings, based on the analysis of five metallic elements included in this study, suggest that the consumption of crayfish abdomen muscle in Qianjiang does not pose any significant health risks. However, it is noteworthy that certain regions exhibit elevated levels of arsenic in the hepatopancreas, surpassing the national standard, thereby rendering them unsuitable for excessive consumption. In general, the findings can be used to provide guidance for safe dietary practices in China. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Health Risk Assessment of the Trace and Macro Elements)
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17 pages, 9013 KiB  
Article
Accumulation Pattern and Risk Assessment of Potentially Toxic Elements in Permafrost-Affected Agricultural Soils in Northeast China
by Junbo Yu, Chuanfang Zhou, Ke Yang, Qifa Sun, Qipeng Zhang, Zhiwei Yang and Yangyang Chen
Toxics 2023, 11(7), 632; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics11070632 - 21 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 796
Abstract
The accumulation of potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in agricultural soils is of particular concern in China, while its status, ecological risks, and human health hazards have been little studied in the permafrost areas of Northeast China. In this study, 75 agricultural soil samples [...] Read more.
The accumulation of potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in agricultural soils is of particular concern in China, while its status, ecological risks, and human health hazards have been little studied in the permafrost areas of Northeast China. In this study, 75 agricultural soil samples (0–20 cm) were collected from the Arctic Village, Mo’he City, in the northernmost part of China. The average concentration (mean ± standard deviation) of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn were 12.11 ± 3.66 mg/kg, 0.11 ± 0.08 mg/kg, 52.50 ± 8.83 mg/kg, 12.08 ± 5.12 mg/kg, 0.05 ± 0.02 mg/kg, 14.90 ± 5.35 mg/kg, 22.38 ± 3.04 mg/kg, and 68.07 ± 22.71 mg/kg, respectively. Correlation analysis, cluster analysis, and principal component analysis indicated that As, Cu, Ni, and Zn likely originated from geogenic processes, Hg and Pb from long-range atmospheric transport, Cd from planting activities, and Cr from Holocene alluvium. The geo-accumulation index and enrichment factor showed that As, Cd, Hg, and Zn are enriched in soils. The Nemerow pollution index showed that 66.67%, 24%, and 1.33% of soil samples were in slight, moderate, and heavy pollution levels, respectively, with Hg being the most important element affecting the comprehensive pollution index. The potential ecological risk index showed that 48.00% and 1.33% of soil samples were in the moderate ecological risk and high potential ecological risk levels, respectively. The non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic human health risk index for adults and children were both less than 1, which was within the acceptable range. This study revealed the accumulation pattern of PTEs in agricultural soils of permafrost regions and provided a scientific basis for research on ecological security and human health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Health Risk Assessment of the Trace and Macro Elements)
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20 pages, 4484 KiB  
Article
Spatial and Multivariate Statistical Analyses of Human Health Risk Associated with the Consumption of Heavy Metals in Groundwater of Monterrey Metropolitan Area, Mexico
by Edrick Ramos, Raja Karim Bux, Dora Ileana Medina, Héctor Barrios-Piña and Jürgen Mahlknecht
Water 2023, 15(6), 1243; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15061243 - 22 Mar 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1750
Abstract
Groundwater is the main source of drinking water supply in most urban environments around the world. The content of potentially toxic elements is increasing in many groundwater systems owing to inadequate groundwater recharge, aquifer overexploitation, natural source release, or various anthropogenic activities that [...] Read more.
Groundwater is the main source of drinking water supply in most urban environments around the world. The content of potentially toxic elements is increasing in many groundwater systems owing to inadequate groundwater recharge, aquifer overexploitation, natural source release, or various anthropogenic activities that lead to groundwater quality degradation. The ingestion of groundwater contaminated with potentially toxic elements has been reported to have harmful health effects. This study aimed to assess the presence of several potentially toxic elements (Al, As, B, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn) in groundwater of the Monterrey metropolitan area in Northern Mexico and the carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic human health risks associated with exposure. Multivariate statistics and geospatial analysis were applied to identify the causative determinants that modify the groundwater quality along the metropolitan area. Mean concentrations of trace metals remained below drinking water standards and World Health Organization guidelines. The risk of harmful effects on human health due to ingestion of all eight metal(loid)s in groundwater was assessed as 2.52 × 10−2 for adults and 2.16 × 10−2 for children, which can be considered as negligible chronic risk and a very low cancer risk. However, the risks of oral consumption of Cr being carcinogenic to children and adults were 7.9 × 10−3 and 9.2 × 10−4, respectively. As these values exceeded the target risk of 1 × 10−4, it can thus be considered “unacceptable”. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Health Risk Assessment of the Trace and Macro Elements)
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15 pages, 2323 KiB  
Article
Spatial and Temporal Variability of Trace and Macro Elements in the Red Crab Pleuroncodes planipes in the Pacific Coast of the Baja California Peninsula, Mexico
by Juan Antonio De Anda-Montañez, Tania Zenteno-Savín, Eduardo F. Balart, Baudilio Acosta-Vargas, Ramón Gaxiola-Robles and Lia Celina Méndez-Rodríguez
Animals 2023, 13(5), 822; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13050822 - 24 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1409
Abstract
The red crab, Pleuroncodes planipes, is a decapod crustacean abundant off the Pacific coast of the Baja California Peninsula. This species is caught and used in preparing animal feed, such as flour, particularly for aquaculture. Levels of calcium (Ca), cadmium (Cd), copper [...] Read more.
The red crab, Pleuroncodes planipes, is a decapod crustacean abundant off the Pacific coast of the Baja California Peninsula. This species is caught and used in preparing animal feed, such as flour, particularly for aquaculture. Levels of calcium (Ca), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), lead (Pb), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), phosphorus (P), and zinc (Zn) were measured in red crabs collected from three geographic zones during three cruises in different seasons. Significant differences were found in the levels of Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mg, Ni, P, and Zn between the two El Niño years (cruises C1 and C3, based on a threshold of ±0.5 °C for the Oceanic Niño Index). The highest concentrations of most elements were observed in the south of the Baja California Peninsula, a highly productive area influenced by upwelling events. Our findings suggest that while environmental temperature plays a central role in the benthic or pelagic distribution of red crabs, their content and variability of trace and macro elements appear to be associated with the presence of oceanic conditions, such as upwelling and potential changes in the composition of their diet associated with the depth in which these crustaceans are collected. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Health Risk Assessment of the Trace and Macro Elements)
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