Topic Editors

1. UCIBIO, REQUIMTE, Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology/Centre of Research in Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
2. Associate Laboratory i4HB - Institute for Health and Bioeconomy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
3. FP-I3ID (Instituto de Investigação, Inovação e Desenvolvimento), FP-BHS (Biomedical and Health Sciences Research Unit), Faculty of Health Sciences, University Fernando Pessoa, 4249-004 Porto, Portugal
1. REQUIMTE, MEDTECH, Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology, Department of Drug Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
2. Mesosystem Investigação & Investimentos by Spinpark, Barco, 4805-017 Guimarães, Portugal
1. Centre for the Research and Technology of Agro-Environmental and Biological Sciences (CITAB), Institute for Innovation, Capacity Building and Sustainability of Agri-Food Production (Inov4Agro), University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro (UTAD), Quinta de Prados, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
2. Mesosystem Investigação & Investimentos by Spinpark, Barco, 4805-017 Guimarães, Portugal

New Challenges in the Cosmetics and Medical Device Industry

Abstract submission deadline
closed (29 February 2024)
Manuscript submission deadline
30 April 2024
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4487

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, cosmetics and medical device manufacturers face several challenges in developing innovative products, with the main objective of meeting the different needs of consumers. In this context, the increasingly widespread use of natural compounds as a source of bioactive molecules, associated with the reuse of industrial and natural waste, in a circular economy perspective, brings economic, environmental and performance advantages to this new product. These bioactive molecules have been showing different activities, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial. In addition, the advent of the biotechnology industry has brought new ingredients, including growth factors, enzymes, peptides, and stem cells, among others. However, to make the use of these bioactive molecules feasible, optimization of their extraction, purification, and formulation is required. In the past 20 years, we have been witnessing the introduction of nanotechnology systems in cosmetic and medical device products. Their use brings several advantages, such as targeting and promoting the absorption of molecules through the skin and external mucous membranes, protecting molecules from degradation and prolonged release, among others. However, the use of this type of technology in cosmetic and medical device products raises regulatory issues that must be taken into account by manufacturers and deserve deep reflection. With this topic, the editors intend to reflect on the future perspectives of cosmetic and medical device products, taking into account not only the use of bioactive molecules obtained from residues and from biotechnological processes, but also the use of nanotechnology to improve the efficacy of the final products.

Prof. Dr. Ana Catarina Silva
Dr. Hugo Almeida
Prof. Dr. Ana Barros
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • cosmetic products
  • medical devices
  • industrial waste
  • natural compounds
  • bioactive agents
  • nanotechnology
  • nanoparticles

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Pharmaceuticals
pharmaceuticals
4.6 4.7 2004 14.6 Days CHF 2900 Submit
Pharmaceutics
pharmaceutics
5.4 6.9 2009 14.2 Days CHF 2900 Submit
Antioxidants
antioxidants
7.0 8.8 2012 13.9 Days CHF 2900 Submit
Nanomaterials
nanomaterials
5.3 7.4 2010 13.6 Days CHF 2900 Submit
Journal of Functional Biomaterials
jfb
4.8 5.0 2010 13.3 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Cosmetics
cosmetics
3.3 4.6 2014 18 Days CHF 1800 Submit

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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30 pages, 13440 KiB  
Article
The Synergistic Influence of Polyflavonoids from Citrus aurantifolia on Diabetes Treatment and Their Modulation of the PI3K/AKT/FOXO1 Signaling Pathways: Molecular Docking Analyses and In Vivo Investigations
by Mohamed A. Hassan, Ghada M. Abd Elmageed, Ibtehal G. El-Qazaz, Doaa S. El-Sayed, Lamia M. El-Samad and Heba M. Abdou
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(9), 2306; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15092306 - 12 Sep 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1481
Abstract
This study was aimed at probing the modulatory influence of polyflavonoids extracted from Citrus aurantifolia, lemon peel extract (LPE-polyflavonoids), on attenuating diabetes mellitus (DM) and its complications. HPLC investigations of the LPE exhibited the incidence of five flavonoids, including diosmin, biochanin A, [...] Read more.
This study was aimed at probing the modulatory influence of polyflavonoids extracted from Citrus aurantifolia, lemon peel extract (LPE-polyflavonoids), on attenuating diabetes mellitus (DM) and its complications. HPLC investigations of the LPE exhibited the incidence of five flavonoids, including diosmin, biochanin A, hesperidin, quercetin, and hesperetin. The in silico impact on ligand-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) interaction was investigated in terms of polyflavonoid class to explore the non-covalent intakes and binding affinity to the known protein active site. The drug likeness properties and pharmacokinetic parameters of the LPE-polyflavonoids were investigated to assess their bioavailability in relation to Myricetin as a control. Remarkably, the molecular docking studies demonstrated a prominent affinity score of all these agents together with PI3K, implying the potency of the extract to orchestrate PI3K, which is the predominant signal for lessening the level of blood glucose. To verify these findings, in vivo studies were conducted, utilizing diabetic male albino rats treated with LPE-polyflavonoids and other groups treated with hesperidin and diosmin as single flavonoids. Our findings demonstrated that the LPE-polyflavonoids significantly ameliorated the levels of glucose, insulin, glycogen, liver function, carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes, G6Pd, and AGEs compared to the diabetic rats and those exposed to hesperidin and diosmin. Furthermore, the LPE-polyflavonoids regulated the TBARS, GSH, CAT, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and AFP levels in the pancreatic and hepatic tissues, suggesting their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In addition, the pancreatic and hepatic GLUT4 and GLUT2 were noticeably increased in addition to the pancreatic p-AKT in the rats administered with the LPE-polyflavonoids compared to the other diabetic rats. Remarkably, the administration of LPE-polyflavonoids upregulated the expression of the pancreatic and hepatic PI3K, AMPK, and FOXO1 genes, emphasizing the efficiency of the LPE in orchestrating all the signaling pathways necessitated to reduce the diabetes mellitus. Notably, the histopathological examinations of the pancreatic and hepatic tissues corroborated the biochemical results. Altogether, our findings accentuated the potential therapeutic role of LPE-polyflavonoids in controlling diabetes mellitus. Full article
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11 pages, 712 KiB  
Article
Combined Bipolar Radiofrequency and Non-Crosslinked Hyaluronic Acid Mesotherapy Protocol to Improve Skin Appearance and Epidermal Barrier Function: A Pilot Study
by Anna Płatkowska, Szymon Korzekwa, Bartłomiej Łukasik and Nicola Zerbinati
Pharmaceuticals 2023, 16(8), 1145; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph16081145 - 12 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1492
Abstract
Background: Age-associated changes in epidermal hydration, pigmentation, thickness and cell renewal influence skin appearance and can lead to laxity, dryness and poor skin tone. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the synergistic effects of a new bipolar radiofrequency plus non-crosslinked [...] Read more.
Background: Age-associated changes in epidermal hydration, pigmentation, thickness and cell renewal influence skin appearance and can lead to laxity, dryness and poor skin tone. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the synergistic effects of a new bipolar radiofrequency plus non-crosslinked hyaluronic acid (HA) mesotherapy protocol compared with radiofrequency alone on skin appearance and markers of epidermal function. Methods: This prospective, single-center, split-face pilot study recruited women aged 25–65 years with dryness and laxity of the facial skin defined by a trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) value of ≥26 g/m2/h. Subjects were treated with a bipolar radiofrequency device on both sides of the face. This was immediately followed by needle hyaluronic acid (HA) treatment on one side of the face with 2.5 mL of a non-crosslinked HA. Photographic documentation, analysis of epidermal barrier function parameters, and high frequency (HF) ultrasound analysis were performed prior to treatment and at 28 days. Results: Twenty female subjects with a mean age of 46 (range 29 to 54) years and dry and lax facial skin were included. TEWL was reduced and skin hydration improved to a greater extent with the combined radiofrequency plus mesotherapy protocol compared with radiofrequency alone (−5.8% vs. +3.9% and +23.1% vs. +1.0%, respectively). The combined protocol was also associated with greater improvements in melanin (−7.5% vs. −1.5%) and erythema values (−7.2% vs. +3.0%), respectively. Ultrasound measures of epidermal thickness and epidermal density were greater after the combined protocol compared with radiofrequency alone (12.0% vs. 5.6% and 57.7% vs. 7.1%, respectively). Both treatments were well-tolerated. Conclusions: The combined bipolar radiofrequency and HA mesotherapy protocol provided greater improvements in skin hydration, firmness and tone compared with radiofrequency alone. The combination treatment was also associated with greater epidermal thickness and density and increased keratinocyte differentiation suggesting a synergistic effect of both treatments on epidermal homeostasis and barrier function. Both treatments were well-tolerated and led to improvements in facial appearance. Full article
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