Vehicle Electrification and the Environment

A special issue of World Electric Vehicle Journal (ISSN 2032-6653).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 November 2022) | Viewed by 7253

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute for Legal Research (ILeR), Faculty of Law, University of Coimbra, 3000-018 Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: data analysis; energy economics; environmental economics; econometric experimental economics; macroeconomics
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Guest Editor
Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra, and Centre for Business and Economics Research (CeBER), Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: energy transition; sustainable energy consumption and economic growth nexus; environmental economics; sustainable energy economics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, because of our world's environmental problems, there is a need to change the energy production/consumption paradigm and accelerate the worldwide energy transition process. One of the ways to achieve this process is through electrification of the transport sector. The electrification of this sector can help to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, including carbon dioxide (CO2) and non-CO2 gases such as methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), partially fluorinated hydrocarbons (HFC), perfluorinated hydrocarbons (PFC), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), and nitrogen trifluoride (NF3). To a greater or lesser extent, these gases are harmful to the environment as they trap heat in the atmosphere, causing global warming. Therefore, purely battery electric vehicles (BEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) become a crucial part of the solution to mitigate climate change.

These issues are why all major automotive brands and governments have supported those kinds of vehicles. Moreover, the production and consumption of this kind of vehicle have increased rapidly in the last few years. Thus, it is valuable to understand the impact of the electrification process of urban transport, and the production of this kind of vehicle, on the environment. Consequently, this Special Issue will primarily focus on identifying and analyzing the effects of the vehicle electrification process on the environment.

This special issue looks for contributions to achieve that objective. The topics include:

  • Vehicle electrification and energy consumption;
  • Electric vehicles and smart grids;
  • Environmental, economic, policy, or social consequences of electric vehicles;
  • Impact of BEVs and PHEVs on fine particulate matter (PM5), CO2 emissions, and GHGs;
  • Electric car production and the environment;
  • Electric car adoption and diseases caused by environmental degradation.

Dr. Matheus Koengkan
Dr. José Alberto Fuinhas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. World Electric Vehicle Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • electric vehicles
  • renewable energy
  • CO2 emissions
  • PM2.5 emissions
  • smart grids
  • environmental degradation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 4466 KiB  
Article
Heterogeneous Impact of Electrification of Road Transport on Premature Deaths from Outdoor Air Pollution: A Macroeconomic Evidence from 29 European Countries
by Emad Kazemzadeh, Matheus Koengkan, José Alberto Fuinhas, Mônica Teixeira and Alexandre Mejdalani
World Electr. Veh. J. 2022, 13(8), 155; https://doi.org/10.3390/wevj13080155 - 13 Aug 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1998
Abstract
One of the biggest problems associated with vehicles that use internal combustion engines is that they cause elevated levels of pollution in the places they travel through, especially if they cause congestion. However, it is not only the level, but also probably the [...] Read more.
One of the biggest problems associated with vehicles that use internal combustion engines is that they cause elevated levels of pollution in the places they travel through, especially if they cause congestion. However, it is not only the level, but also probably the concentration of gases emitted by internal combustion engines in the places where they move around that is particularly lethal. Can the road transport sector’s electrification mitigate premature deaths from outdoor air pollution? Our main hypothesis is that replacing internal combustion engine vehicles with electrical ones contributes to mitigating people’s exposure to high concentrations of air pollution. To answer the research question, a panel of 29 European countries, from 2010 to 2020, using the method of moments quantile regression and ordinary least squares, was examined. Results support the concept that economic growth, renewable energy consumption, and electric vehicles in all quantiles have a negative impact on premature mortality due to air pollution. These impacts are higher on premature mortality in lower quantiles, but gradually decrease with increasing quantile levels. The results also reveal that methane emissions, in all quantiles except 10th, have a negative effect on premature mortality. Nitrous oxide emissions positively impact premature mortality in all quantiles except the 10th, and this impact increases at high quantiles. Fine particulate matter positively impacts premature mortality in all quantiles, with the same at all levels. The ordinary least squares, used as a robustness check, confirm that economic growth, renewable energy consumption, and methane emissions have reduced impacts on premature mortality due to outdoor air pollution. However, nitrous oxide emissions and fine particulate matter increase premature mortality. These results reinforce the importance of policymakers implementing policies for road electrification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vehicle Electrification and the Environment)
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22 pages, 2443 KiB  
Article
The Capacity of Battery-Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles to Mitigate CO2 Emissions: Macroeconomic Evidence from European Union Countries
by Matheus Koengkan, José Alberto Fuinhas, Mônica Teixeira, Emad Kazemzadeh, Anna Auza, Fatemeh Dehdar and Fariba Osmani
World Electr. Veh. J. 2022, 13(4), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/wevj13040058 - 24 Mar 2022
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 4386
Abstract
The decarbonisation of the transportation sector is crucial to reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. This study analyses evidence from European countries regarding achievement of the European Commission’s goal of achieving carbon neutrality by 2050. Using panel quantile econometric techniques, the impact [...] Read more.
The decarbonisation of the transportation sector is crucial to reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. This study analyses evidence from European countries regarding achievement of the European Commission’s goal of achieving carbon neutrality by 2050. Using panel quantile econometric techniques, the impact of battery-electric vehicles (BEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) on CO2 emissions in twenty-nine European Union (EU) countries from 2010–2020 was researched. The results show that BEVs and PHEVs are capable of mitigating CO2 emissions. However, each type of technology has a different degree of impact, with BEVs being more suited to minimizing CO2 emissions than PHEVs. We also found a statistically significant impact of economic development (quantile regression results) and energy consumption in increasing the emissions of CO2 in the EU countries in model estimates for both BEVs and PHEVs. It should be noted that BEVs face challenges, such as the scarcity of minerals for the production of batteries and the increased demand for mineral batteries, which have significant environmental impacts. Therefore, policymakers should adopt environmentally efficient transport that uses clean energy, such as EVs, to reduce the harmful effects on public health and the environment caused by the indiscriminate use of fossil fuels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vehicle Electrification and the Environment)
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