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Special Issue "Wetlands in Action: Sustainable Water Management and Resource Recovery"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Quality and Ecosystems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Hans Brix

Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Denmark
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 0045 28992031
Interests: Wetlands, wastewater treatment, ecological engineering, plant ecophysiology, paludiculture
Guest Editor
Dr. Carlos A. Arias

Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Denmark
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 0045 28693836
Interests: Constructed wetlands, wastewater, circular economy
Guest Editor
Dr. Brian K. Sorrell

Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Denmark
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 0045 23666864
Interests: Wetland ecology, aquatic plants, plant ecophysiology, paludiculture
Guest Editor
Dr. Franziska Eller

Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Denmark
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 0045 87156116
Interests: Plant ecophysiology, climate change effects, phenotypic plasticity, paludiculture

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research in natural wetlands as well as constructed wetlands has increased exponentially in the past ten years. Wetlands, both natural and constructed, provide a wide range of ecological benefits or services that might include water quality improvement, nutrient processing, or carbon sequestration as well as recreation and habitat improvement. During the past few decades, many wetland-based water treatment technologies have been developed and tested, and now several of these are being applied as ecotechnologies for sustainable water management. Wetlands are also being used for resource recovery and crop production in paludiculture. Hence, wetlands contribute to ensuring sustainable water management and resource recovery while at the same time regulating and mitigating impacts of global climate change.

Prof. Dr. Hans Brix
Dr. Carlos A. Arias
Dr. Brian K. Sorrell
Dr. Franziska Eller
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Constructed wetlands
  • Treatment wetlands
  • Wetland ecology
  • Ecotechnologies
  • Paludiculture
  • Ecosystem services
  • Greenhouse gas emissions
  • Nutrient removal
  • Denitrification
  • Forced aeration

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Assessment of Potential Toxic Metals in a Ramsar Wetland, Central Mexico and its Self-Depuration through Eichhornia crassipes
Water 2019, 11(6), 1248; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11061248
Received: 7 May 2019 / Revised: 11 June 2019 / Accepted: 12 June 2019 / Published: 14 June 2019
PDF Full-text (3116 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The Valsequillo reservoir is a Ramsar wetland due to its importance as a point of convergence of migratory waterfowl. It is located in Central Mexico and is currently endangered by the constant spill of municipal and industrial discharges from Puebla city. On this [...] Read more.
The Valsequillo reservoir is a Ramsar wetland due to its importance as a point of convergence of migratory waterfowl. It is located in Central Mexico and is currently endangered by the constant spill of municipal and industrial discharges from Puebla city. On this context, we evaluated thirteen potential toxic metals (PTMs) in water, Water hyacinth (E. crassipes) plants and sediments at this site. A combined number of 31 samples were collected from the study area. The degree/extent of metal contamination in sediments was assessed through different geochemical indexes, namely: Geoaccumulation index (Igeo), Enrichment Factor (EF) and Potential Ecological Risk Index (PERI). The ability of Water hyacinth plants residues as a phytodepurator in the Ramsar site was tested in terms of the bioaccumulation factor (BF) and the translocation factor (TF). The results concerning sediments showed that Pb, Cu and Hg pose a threat to the aquatic environment since Igeo and EF indicate sediments ranging from moderately contaminated to contaminated. Moreover, PERI pointed out Hg as the main contributor to the ecological risk in sediments, especially in the part of the reservoir covered by E. crassipes. Water hyacinth plants displayed good capacity to absorb PTMs from the water, since the content of Co, Zn, As, Ni, Cu, Pb, Ti, Cr, Ba, Mo and V in the total plant was (all values in mg/kg of dry weight) 21 ± 9, 408 ± 300, 12 ± 6, 93 ± 21, 93 ± 69, 53 ± 29, 1067 ± 643, 78 ± 55, 362 ± 39, 14 ± 0.6 and 96 ± 35, respectively. Metal content in sediments resembles to that of E. crassipes; especially in the roots, suggesting a constant deposition of plants at the bottom of the reservoir, which contributes to the eutrophication of the water. The present work encourages the need for a sustainable management of Water hyacinth plants in the Ramsar site, since they represent a plague and a natural phyto-depurator at the same time. Full article
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