Special Issue "Water Resources Assessment, Development and Management in Coupled Human-Natural Systems"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water and One Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jianyun Zhang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Nanjing Hydraulic Research Institute, Nanjing 210029, China
2. State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, 200024, China
Interests: hydrology; hydro-environment; flood forecast; water resources management
Prof. Dr. Junguo Liu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China
Interests: hydrology and water resources; global environmental change
Prof. Dr. Xiaojun Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Nanjing Hydraulic Research Institute, Nanjing, China
Interests: water and climate change; water management
Prof. Dr. Jiaguo Qi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Global Change & Earth Observations, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823, USA
Interests: Land use and land cover change dynamics; geospatial technologies and applications; water-energy-food nexus; natural resources management
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Chunmiao Zheng
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China
Interests: groundwater; hydrology and water resources
Prof. Dr. Olli Varis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Water & Development Research Group, Aalto University, 00076 Espoo, Finland
Interests: security and sustainability linkages; water-energy-food nexus; water management; global resource issues; climate change
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Hong Yang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Eawag, 8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland
Interests: water management; agricultural economics
Dr. Duong Du Bui
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (MONRE), Vietnam
Interests: water monitoring and assessment; water management
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Jialiang Cai
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Built Environment, Aalto University, Espoo, 02150, Finland
Interests: water resource assessment and management; water–energy–food nexus; Sustainable Development Goals assessment; policy effectiveness assessment
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water resources assessment and management are key to achieving the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in particular the dedicated goal on water and sanitation (SDG6). In 2016, the "Shenzhen Declaration on Global Hydrological Science and Practice" (Hereafter referred as the "Shenzhen Declaration") was released after the first International Conference on Hydrological Knowledge Innovation and its Practices in Developing Countries, organized by the scientific decade 2013–2022 of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS). The Shenzhen Declaration emphasizes water resources assessment and management in coupled human–natural systems, particularly in developing countries. In the context of global change, many solutions to water resources assessment and management challenges can be sought, using the approach of coupled human–natural systems (https://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/full/10.1175/BAMS-D-17-0193.1). These challenges include, to mention a few, integrated assessment approaches of green and blue water resources, accounting for water footprint and virtual water, understanding the water–energy–food nexus, globalization vs. localization of water resources, water management by considering both physical and virtual water, and the impacts of ongoing industrial and demographic transition on water security.

The aim of this Special Issue is to bring together new theory, methods, technologies, and policy recommendations in water resources assessment and management in coupled human–natural systems. The overarching theme of this Special Issue is “Water Resources Assessment, Development, and Management in Coupled Human–Natural Systems”, with the following focal areas:

  1. Water–energy–food nexus
  2. Integrated assessment of green and blue water resources, as well as virtual water and water footprint
  3. Efficient water resources utilization
  4. Water resources planning under the changing environment and evolving economic structure
  5. Trade-offs between economic competitiveness, social welfare, and environmental sustainability
  6. Policy implementation and scenarios on water security and sustainability

Water is an intrinsic issue for the Sustainable Development Goals. Thus, this Special Issue will be of high interest to scientists, scholars, planners, decision makers, and the general readership of the journal. We invite the scientific community to contribute manuscripts regarding suitable topics to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Jianyun Zhang
Prof. Dr. Junguo Liu
Prof. Dr. Xiaojun Wang
Prof. Dr. Jiaguo Qi
Prof. Dr. Chunmiao Zheng
Prof. Dr. Olli Varis
Prof. Dr. Hong Yang
Dr. Duong Du Bui
Dr. Jialiang Cai
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of Water Resources Carrying Capacity and Its Obstruction Factor Analysis: A Case Study of Hubei Province, China
Water 2019, 11(12), 2573; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11122573 - 06 Dec 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 881
Abstract
The carrying capacity of water resources can provide a reference index for regional economic construction and development. Hubei produces 13.2% of China’s hydroelectric energy and 4% of China’s water resources, highlighting that the reservoir group in Hubei province is relatively developed. In the [...] Read more.
The carrying capacity of water resources can provide a reference index for regional economic construction and development. Hubei produces 13.2% of China’s hydroelectric energy and 4% of China’s water resources, highlighting that the reservoir group in Hubei province is relatively developed. In the current research on water resources carrying capacity, only the amount of water resources was considered; the benign mutual feeding effect of regional reservoirs on regional water resources carrying capacity was not reflected upon. In order to guide social and economic activities better, this paper proposes the addition of reservoir water storage to the calculation of water resources carrying capacity as a separate indicator. In this paper, the cloud model method was used to calculate the water resources carrying capacity of Hubei province and the Dematel method was used to determine the degree of importance of reservoir water storage. Finally, the degree of obstacles was also considered to discuss the main factors affecting the water resources carrying capacity of Hubei province. In the system discussed in this paper, the degree of influence and the affected degree of reservoir water storage were found to be 1.2915 and 0.5759, respectively. The calculation results showed that Hubei province’s water resources carrying capacity has been increasing every year and the amount of water resources per unit area was the main restricting factor, with the obstacle degree reaching 19.24% of the average annual level. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Characteristics and Adaptability Assessment of Commonly Used Ecological Flow Methods in Water Storage and Hydropower Projects, the Case of Chinese River Basins
Water 2019, 11(10), 2035; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11102035 - 29 Sep 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 792
Abstract
The construction and operation of water storage and hydropower projects affects the structure of water ecosystems of downstream rivers, and the establishment of ecological flow in rivers below the water storage and hydropower projects has significant impacts on maintaining the stability of river [...] Read more.
The construction and operation of water storage and hydropower projects affects the structure of water ecosystems of downstream rivers, and the establishment of ecological flow in rivers below the water storage and hydropower projects has significant impacts on maintaining the stability of river ecosystems. A database was established based on 2000–2017 environmental impact assessment (EIA) reports on water storage and hydropower projects in China and ecological flow (e-flow) methods, and the three widely used e-flow methods for water storage and hydropower projects in China were identified on the database. Furthermore, an ecological flow satisfaction degree model was used to evaluate the methods using long series of historical hydrological data from the hydrological stations in the Yellow River basin, the Yangtze River basin, and the Liao River basin. The results showed that hydrological methods are the type most often used for water storage and hydropower projects in China, including the Tennant method, the minimum monthly average flow with 90% guarantee rate method (Mm9M method), and the measured historical minimum daily average flow rate method (MDM method). However, the ecological flow methods selected are not significantly different among different basins, indicating that the selection of ecological flow methods is rather arbitrary, and adaptability analysis is not available. The results of the ecological flow satisfaction model showed that the Tennant method is not suitable for large river basins. The results of this study can provide technical support for establishment and management decisions surrounding ecological flow. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Uncertainty in Estimated Trends Using Gridded Rainfall Data: A Case Study of Bangladesh
Water 2019, 11(2), 349; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11020349 - 19 Feb 2019
Cited by 24 | Viewed by 1885
Abstract
This study assessed the uncertainty in the spatial pattern of rainfall trends in six widely used monthly gridded rainfall datasets for 1979–2010. Bangladesh is considered as the case study area where changes in rainfall are the highest concern due to global warming-induced climate [...] Read more.
This study assessed the uncertainty in the spatial pattern of rainfall trends in six widely used monthly gridded rainfall datasets for 1979–2010. Bangladesh is considered as the case study area where changes in rainfall are the highest concern due to global warming-induced climate change. The evaluation was based on the ability of the gridded data to estimate the spatial patterns of the magnitude and significance of annual and seasonal rainfall trends estimated using Mann–Kendall (MK) and modified MK (mMK) tests at 34 gauges. A set of statistical indices including Kling–Gupta efficiency, modified index of agreement (md), skill score (SS), and Jaccard similarity index (JSI) were used. The results showed a large variation in the spatial patterns of rainfall trends obtained using different gridded datasets. Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) data was found to be the most suitable rainfall data for the assessment of annual and seasonal rainfall trends in Bangladesh which showed a JSI, md, and SS of 22%, 0.61, and 0.73, respectively, when compared with the observed annual trend. Assessment of long-term trend in rainfall (1901–2017) using mMK test revealed no change in annual rainfall and changes in seasonal rainfall only at a few grid points in Bangladesh over the last century. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
A Spatial and Temporal Study of the Green and Blue Water Flow Distribution in Typical Ecosystems and its Ecosystem Services Function in an Arid Basin
Water 2019, 11(1), 97; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11010097 - 08 Jan 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1482
Abstract
Research on relationship between green and blue water flow and ecosystem service functions has great significance for improving water resources management and for ecological protection. In this study, the distribution patterns and service functions of green and blue water flow in different ecosystems [...] Read more.
Research on relationship between green and blue water flow and ecosystem service functions has great significance for improving water resources management and for ecological protection. In this study, the distribution patterns and service functions of green and blue water flow in different ecosystems were analysed by Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model simulation and Correlational Analysis. In the entire basin, the amount of green and blue water flow in the grassland was greater than that in the cropland, and that in the cropland was larger than that in the forest. The corn yield per hectare of cropland was highest in the Heihe River Basin, followed by wheat, and the lowest yield was the oil yield from 2000 to 2010. The mutton yield in the grassland ecosystem was greater than the beef yield from 2000 to 2010, which shows that the beef production would consume more water flow. Results show an obvious positive correlation between green or blue water flow and wheat and corn yields. Beef and mutton had a significant correlation with blue water flow, whereas mutton had a stronger correlation with green water flow. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Meteorological Drought Monitoring in Northeastern China Using Multiple Indices
Water 2019, 11(1), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11010072 - 03 Jan 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1732
Abstract
Drought monitoring is one of the significant issues of water resources assessment. Multiple drought indices (DIs), including Percent of Normal (PN), Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), statistical Z-Score, and Effective Drought Index (EDI) at 18 different timesteps were employed to evaluate the drought condition [...] Read more.
Drought monitoring is one of the significant issues of water resources assessment. Multiple drought indices (DIs), including Percent of Normal (PN), Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), statistical Z-Score, and Effective Drought Index (EDI) at 18 different timesteps were employed to evaluate the drought condition in Wuyuer River Basin (WRB), Northeast China. Daily precipitation data of 50 years (1960–2010) from three meteorological stations were used in this study. We found DIs with intermediate time steps (7 to 18 months) to have the highest predictive values for identifying droughts. And DIs exhibited a better similarity in the 12-month timestep. Among all the DIs, EDI exhibited the best correlation with other DIs for various timesteps. When further comparing with historical droughts, Z-Score, SPI, and EDI were found more sensitive to multi-monthly cumulative precipitation changes (r2 > 0.55) with respect to monthly precipitation changes (r2 ≤ 0.10), while EDI was more preferable when only monthly precipitation data were available. These results indicated that various indices for different timesteps should be investigated in drought monitoring in WRB, especially the intermediate timesteps should be considered. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Towards Ecological-Economic Integrity in the Jing-Jin-Ji Regional Development in China
Water 2018, 10(11), 1653; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10111653 - 14 Nov 2018
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1487
Abstract
In China, the regional development policy has been shifting from solely economic orientation to ecologically sound economic growth. Using the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (Jing-Jin-Ji) region as a case study, we evaluated the temporal variations in ecosystem service values (ESVs) associated with land use changes from [...] Read more.
In China, the regional development policy has been shifting from solely economic orientation to ecologically sound economic growth. Using the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (Jing-Jin-Ji) region as a case study, we evaluated the temporal variations in ecosystem service values (ESVs) associated with land use changes from 1990 to 2015. We analyzed the dynamic relations between ESVs and the economy (indicated by the gross domestic product, GDP) by introducing the elasticity indicator (EI), which reflects the growth synchronism between the two, and the ecosystem service load (ESL), which reflects the ecological efficiency of economic growth. The results showed that the land use changes in Jing-Jin-Ji have been characterized by decreases in water areas, cropland, and grassland and increases in woodland and built-up areas. The ESVs of woodland and water areas contributed to 80% of the total ESV of the region, and the total ESV increased by 13.87% as a result of an area increase in woodland (26.87%). The average EI of Jing-Jin-Ji improved from 0.028 to 0.293 over the study period, indicating that the growth of ESVs was being balanced with the growth in the GDP. The average ESL decreased by 1.24, suggesting a significant improvement in ecological efficiency per unit GDP. Within the Jing-Jin-Ji region, large disparities in EI and ESL were shown to exist among Beijing, Tianjin, and Hebei owing to their differences in ecological resources, GDP compositions, and development levels. The study highlights the needs to reinforce woodland and water conservation, adjust economic structures, and balance the intraregional development to achieve the ecological-economic integrity of the region. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop