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Special Issue "Water Resources Assessment, Development and Management in Coupled Human-Natural Systems"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Resources Management and Governance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jianyun Zhang

Nanjing Hydraulic Research Institute, Nanjing, China
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Interests: water and climate change; water management
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Junguo Liu

Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: hydrology and water resources; global environmental change
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Xiaojun Wang

Nanjing Hydraulic Research Institute, Nanjing, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: water and climate change; water management
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jiaguo Qi

Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
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Interests: remote sensing of environment; water-energy-food nexus
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Chunmiao Zheng

Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China
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Interests: groundwater; hydrology and water resources
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Olli Varis

Water & Development Research Group, Aalto University, 00076 Espoo, Finland
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Interests: security and sustainability linkages; water-energy-food nexus; water management; global resource issues; climate change
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Hong Yang

Eawag, 8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland
Website | E-Mail
Interests: water management; agricultural economics
Guest Editor
Dr. Duong Du Bui

Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (MONRE), Vietnam
E-Mail
Interests: water monitoring and assessment; water management
Guest Editor
Dr. Jialiang Cai

Water & Development Research Group, Aalto University, 02015 Espoo, Finland
Website | E-Mail
Interests: integrated water resources management; water-energy-food nexus; sustainable water and energy security; environmental governance and policy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water resources assessment and management are key to achieving the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in particular the dedicated goal on water and sanitation (SDG6). In 2016, the "Shenzhen Declaration on Global Hydrological Science and Practice" (Hereafter referred as the "Shenzhen Declaration") was released after the first International Conference on Hydrological Knowledge Innovation and its Practices in Developing Countries, organized by the scientific decade 2013–2022 of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS). The Shenzhen Declaration emphasizes water resources assessment and management in coupled human–natural systems, particularly in developing countries. In the context of global change, many solutions to water resources assessment and management challenges can be sought, using the approach of coupled human–natural systems (https://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/full/10.1175/BAMS-D-17-0193.1). These challenges include, to mention a few, integrated assessment approaches of green and blue water resources, accounting for water footprint and virtual water, understanding the water–energy–food nexus, globalization vs. localization of water resources, water management by considering both physical and virtual water, and the impacts of ongoing industrial and demographic transition on water security.

The aim of this Special Issue is to bring together new theory, methods, technologies, and policy recommendations in water resources assessment and management in coupled human–natural systems. The overarching theme of this Special Issue is “Water Resources Assessment, Development, and Management in Coupled Human–Natural Systems”, with the following focal areas:

  1. Water–energy–food nexus
  2. Integrated assessment of green and blue water resources, as well as virtual water and water footprint
  3. Efficient water resources utilization
  4. Water resources planning under the changing environment and evolving economic structure
  5. Trade-offs between economic competitiveness, social welfare, and environmental sustainability
  6. Policy implementation and scenarios on water security and sustainability

Water is an intrinsic issue for the Sustainable Development Goals. Thus, this Special Issue will be of high interest to scientists, scholars, planners, decision makers, and the general readership of the journal. We invite the scientific community to contribute manuscripts regarding suitable topics to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Jianyun Zhang
Prof. Dr. Junguo Liu
Prof. Dr. Xiaojun Wang
Prof. Dr. Jiaguo Qi
Prof. Dr. Chunmiao Zheng
Prof. Dr. Olli Varis
Prof. Dr. Hong Yang
Dr. Duong Du Bui
Dr. Jialiang Cai
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Uncertainty in Estimated Trends Using Gridded Rainfall Data: A Case Study of Bangladesh
Water 2019, 11(2), 349; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11020349
Received: 14 December 2018 / Revised: 2 February 2019 / Accepted: 2 February 2019 / Published: 19 February 2019
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (6371 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study assessed the uncertainty in the spatial pattern of rainfall trends in six widely used monthly gridded rainfall datasets for 1979–2010. Bangladesh is considered as the case study area where changes in rainfall are the highest concern due to global warming-induced climate [...] Read more.
This study assessed the uncertainty in the spatial pattern of rainfall trends in six widely used monthly gridded rainfall datasets for 1979–2010. Bangladesh is considered as the case study area where changes in rainfall are the highest concern due to global warming-induced climate change. The evaluation was based on the ability of the gridded data to estimate the spatial patterns of the magnitude and significance of annual and seasonal rainfall trends estimated using Mann–Kendall (MK) and modified MK (mMK) tests at 34 gauges. A set of statistical indices including Kling–Gupta efficiency, modified index of agreement (md), skill score (SS), and Jaccard similarity index (JSI) were used. The results showed a large variation in the spatial patterns of rainfall trends obtained using different gridded datasets. Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) data was found to be the most suitable rainfall data for the assessment of annual and seasonal rainfall trends in Bangladesh which showed a JSI, md, and SS of 22%, 0.61, and 0.73, respectively, when compared with the observed annual trend. Assessment of long-term trend in rainfall (1901–2017) using mMK test revealed no change in annual rainfall and changes in seasonal rainfall only at a few grid points in Bangladesh over the last century. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A Spatial and Temporal Study of the Green and Blue Water Flow Distribution in Typical Ecosystems and its Ecosystem Services Function in an Arid Basin
Water 2019, 11(1), 97; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11010097
Received: 4 December 2018 / Revised: 31 December 2018 / Accepted: 3 January 2019 / Published: 8 January 2019
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Abstract
Research on relationship between green and blue water flow and ecosystem service functions has great significance for improving water resources management and for ecological protection. In this study, the distribution patterns and service functions of green and blue water flow in different ecosystems [...] Read more.
Research on relationship between green and blue water flow and ecosystem service functions has great significance for improving water resources management and for ecological protection. In this study, the distribution patterns and service functions of green and blue water flow in different ecosystems were analysed by Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model simulation and Correlational Analysis. In the entire basin, the amount of green and blue water flow in the grassland was greater than that in the cropland, and that in the cropland was larger than that in the forest. The corn yield per hectare of cropland was highest in the Heihe River Basin, followed by wheat, and the lowest yield was the oil yield from 2000 to 2010. The mutton yield in the grassland ecosystem was greater than the beef yield from 2000 to 2010, which shows that the beef production would consume more water flow. Results show an obvious positive correlation between green or blue water flow and wheat and corn yields. Beef and mutton had a significant correlation with blue water flow, whereas mutton had a stronger correlation with green water flow. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Meteorological Drought Monitoring in Northeastern China Using Multiple Indices
Water 2019, 11(1), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11010072
Received: 7 November 2018 / Revised: 26 December 2018 / Accepted: 26 December 2018 / Published: 3 January 2019
PDF Full-text (5797 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Drought monitoring is one of the significant issues of water resources assessment. Multiple drought indices (DIs), including Percent of Normal (PN), Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), statistical Z-Score, and Effective Drought Index (EDI) at 18 different timesteps were employed to evaluate the drought condition [...] Read more.
Drought monitoring is one of the significant issues of water resources assessment. Multiple drought indices (DIs), including Percent of Normal (PN), Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), statistical Z-Score, and Effective Drought Index (EDI) at 18 different timesteps were employed to evaluate the drought condition in Wuyuer River Basin (WRB), Northeast China. Daily precipitation data of 50 years (1960–2010) from three meteorological stations were used in this study. We found DIs with intermediate time steps (7 to 18 months) to have the highest predictive values for identifying droughts. And DIs exhibited a better similarity in the 12-month timestep. Among all the DIs, EDI exhibited the best correlation with other DIs for various timesteps. When further comparing with historical droughts, Z-Score, SPI, and EDI were found more sensitive to multi-monthly cumulative precipitation changes (r2 > 0.55) with respect to monthly precipitation changes (r2 ≤ 0.10), while EDI was more preferable when only monthly precipitation data were available. These results indicated that various indices for different timesteps should be investigated in drought monitoring in WRB, especially the intermediate timesteps should be considered. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Towards Ecological-Economic Integrity in the Jing-Jin-Ji Regional Development in China
Water 2018, 10(11), 1653; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10111653
Received: 25 October 2018 / Revised: 10 November 2018 / Accepted: 12 November 2018 / Published: 14 November 2018
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Abstract
In China, the regional development policy has been shifting from solely economic orientation to ecologically sound economic growth. Using the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (Jing-Jin-Ji) region as a case study, we evaluated the temporal variations in ecosystem service values (ESVs) associated with land use changes from [...] Read more.
In China, the regional development policy has been shifting from solely economic orientation to ecologically sound economic growth. Using the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (Jing-Jin-Ji) region as a case study, we evaluated the temporal variations in ecosystem service values (ESVs) associated with land use changes from 1990 to 2015. We analyzed the dynamic relations between ESVs and the economy (indicated by the gross domestic product, GDP) by introducing the elasticity indicator (EI), which reflects the growth synchronism between the two, and the ecosystem service load (ESL), which reflects the ecological efficiency of economic growth. The results showed that the land use changes in Jing-Jin-Ji have been characterized by decreases in water areas, cropland, and grassland and increases in woodland and built-up areas. The ESVs of woodland and water areas contributed to 80% of the total ESV of the region, and the total ESV increased by 13.87% as a result of an area increase in woodland (26.87%). The average EI of Jing-Jin-Ji improved from 0.028 to 0.293 over the study period, indicating that the growth of ESVs was being balanced with the growth in the GDP. The average ESL decreased by 1.24, suggesting a significant improvement in ecological efficiency per unit GDP. Within the Jing-Jin-Ji region, large disparities in EI and ESL were shown to exist among Beijing, Tianjin, and Hebei owing to their differences in ecological resources, GDP compositions, and development levels. The study highlights the needs to reinforce woodland and water conservation, adjust economic structures, and balance the intraregional development to achieve the ecological-economic integrity of the region. Full article
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