E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Study of the Soil Water Movement in Irrigated Agriculture"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 January 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. George Kargas

Department of Natural Resources Management and Agricultural Engineering Agricultural University of Athens; Greece
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +30 210 5294084
Interests: Soil physics; flow and transport in soils; dielectric sensors; salinity; irrigation and drainage
Guest Editor
Emeritus Prof. Dr. Petros Kerkides

Department of Natural Resources Management and Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural University of Athens; Greece
E-Mail
Phone: +30 210 5294066
Interests: Soil physics; agricultural meteorology; irrigation and drainage; salt transport in soils.
Guest Editor
Dr. Paraskevi Londra

Department of Natural Resources Management and Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural University of Athens; Greece
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +30 210 5294069
Interests: Soil physics; plant soil-water interaction; flow and transport in soils; horticultural substrates; vadose zone hydrology, water resources management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In irrigated agriculture, the study of the various ways water infiltrates into the soils is necessary. In this respect, soil hydraulic properties, such as moisture retention curve (SMRC), diffusivity, and hydraulic conductivity functions, play a crucial role, as they control the infiltration process and the soil water and solute movement.

Modeling and flow simulation of soil water movement depends on the appropriate description of the hydraulic properties and their measurements (in situ and in the laboratory), upon which these are provided. A comprehensive review of the recent developments in the various aspects of soil water movement in irrigated agriculture is welcome.

The above may be presented in a number of research topics that tackle one or more of the following challenges:

  • Irrigation systems and one-, two-, and three-dimensional soil water movement.
  • One- and three-dimensional infiltration analysis from a disc infiltrometer.
  • Dielectric devices for monitoring soil water content and methods for assessment of soil water pressure head.
  • Soil hydraulic properties and their temporal and spatial variability under the irrigation situations.
  • Saturated–unsaturated flow model in irrigated soils.
  • Soil water redistribution and the role of hysteresis.
  • Soil water movement and drainage in irrigated agriculture.
  • Salt accumulation, soil salinization, and soil salinity assessment.
  • Effect of salts on hydraulic conductivity.
  • Soil conditioners and mulches which change the upper soil hydraulic properties and their effect on soil water movement.

Prof. Dr. George Kargas
Emeritus Prof. Dr. Petros Kerkides
Dr. Paraskevi Londra
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Infiltration process
  • hydraulic properties
  • water and salt transport in irrigated soils
  • modeling water flow
  • disc infiltrometer
  • dielectric sensors

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Dynamics and Distribution of Soil Salinity under Long-Term Mulched Drip Irrigation in an Arid Area of Northwestern China
Water 2019, 11(6), 1225; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11061225
Received: 8 May 2019 / Revised: 6 June 2019 / Accepted: 9 June 2019 / Published: 12 June 2019
PDF Full-text (2287 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Mulched drip irrigation has been widely used in agricultural planting in arid and semi-arid regions. The dynamics and distribution of soil salinity under mulched drip irrigation greatly affect crop growth and yield. However, there are still different views on the distribution and dynamics [...] Read more.
Mulched drip irrigation has been widely used in agricultural planting in arid and semi-arid regions. The dynamics and distribution of soil salinity under mulched drip irrigation greatly affect crop growth and yield. However, there are still different views on the distribution and dynamics of soil salinity under long-term mulched drip irrigation due to complex factors (climate, groundwater, irrigation, and soil). Therefore, the soil salinity of newly reclaimed salt wasteland was monitored for 9 years (2008–2016), and the effects of soil water on soil salinity distribution under mulched drip irrigation have also been explored. The results indicated that the soil salinity decreased sharply in 3–4 years of implementation of mulched drip irrigation, and then began to fluctuate to different degrees and showed slight re-accumulation. During the growth period, soil salinity was relatively high at pre-sowing, and after a period of decline soil salinity tends to increase in the late harvest period. The vertical distribution of soil texture had a significant effect on the distribution of soil salinity. Salt accumulated near the soil layer transiting from coarse soil to fine soil. After a single irrigation, the soil water content in the 30–70 cm layer under the cotton plant undergoes a ‘high–low–high’ change pattern, and the soil salt firstly moved to the deep layer (below 70 cm), and then showed upward migration tendency with the weakening of irrigation water infiltration. The results may contribute to the scientific extension of mulched drip irrigation and the farmland management under long-term mulched drip irrigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Study of the Soil Water Movement in Irrigated Agriculture)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Modeling of Fertilizer Transport for Various Fertigation Scenarios under Drip Irrigation
Water 2019, 11(5), 893; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11050893
Received: 1 April 2019 / Revised: 18 April 2019 / Accepted: 20 April 2019 / Published: 28 April 2019
PDF Full-text (4374 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Frequent application of nitrogen fertilizers through irrigation is likely to increase the concentration of nitrate in groundwater. In this study, the HYDRUS-2D/3D model was used to simulate fertilizer movement through the soil under surface (DI) and subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) with 10 and [...] Read more.
Frequent application of nitrogen fertilizers through irrigation is likely to increase the concentration of nitrate in groundwater. In this study, the HYDRUS-2D/3D model was used to simulate fertilizer movement through the soil under surface (DI) and subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) with 10 and 20 cm emitter depths for tomato growing in three different typical and representative Egyptian soil types, namely sand, loamy sand, and sandy loam. Ammonium, nitrate, phosphorus, and potassium fertilizers were considered during simulation. Laboratory experiments were conducted to estimate the soils’ adsorption behavior. The impact of soil hydraulic properties and fertigation strategies on fertilizer distribution and use efficiency were investigated. Results showed that for DI, the percentage of nitrogen accumulated below the zone of maximum root density was 33%, 28%, and 24% for sand, loamy sand, and sandy loam soil, respectively. For SDI with 10 and 20 cm emitter depths, it was 34%, 29%, and 26%, and 44%, 37%, and 35%, respectively. Results showed that shallow emitter depth produced maximum nitrogen use efficiency varying from 27 to 37%, regardless of fertigation strategy. Therefore, subsurface drip irrigation with a shallow emitter depth is recommended for medium-textured soils. Moreover, the study showed that to reduce potential fertilizer leaching, fertilizers should be added at the beginning of irrigation events for SDI and at the end of irrigation events for DI. As nitrate uptake rate and leaching are affected by soil’s adsorption, it is important to determine the adsorption coefficient for nitrate before planting, as it will help to precisely assign application rates. This will lead to improve nutrient uptake and minimize potential leaching. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Study of the Soil Water Movement in Irrigated Agriculture)
Figures

Figure 1

Water EISSN 2073-4441 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top