The Management of Eutrophication, Harmful Algal Bloom and Ecological Health in Freshwater Ecosystems

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Ecohydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 October 2024 | Viewed by 1763

Special Issue Editors


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Department of Biology Education, College of Education, Konjgu National University, Gongju 32588, Republic of Korea
Interests: freshwater fish migration; fish diet analysis; fish distribution; cyanobacteria–zooplankton interaction; restoration biodiversity conservation

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Guest Editor
National Institute of Environmental Research, Han River Environment Research Center, Gyeonggi-do 12585, Republic of Korea
Interests: water quality; taste odor compounds; anthropogenic impacts; emerging pollutants; phytoplankton; ecological index; water monitoring and treatment
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Freshwater is a critical resource for the survival of human beings and other biota. However, freshwater ecosystems globally are facing unprecedented threats induced by a broad range of human activities. Moreover, climate change is aggravating these threats in unpredictable ways. Eutrophication, which causes the occurrence of harmful algal blooms, is the most common problem faced by freshwater systems. Cyanobacteria blooms produce harmful materials, including toxins and off-flavor substances, and are regarded as potential hazards, particularly with respect to water resource management and ecosystem health.

This Special Issue was developed with the aim of highlighting studies aiming to improve scientific understanding and strategies for sound aquatic ecosystem management and services for researchers, decision makers, and stakeholders. We seek research papers on various aspects of eutrophication, harmful algae, and ecosystem health in relation to land use, watershed management, climate change, and restoration. Although the theme of this Special Issue is confined to freshwater ecosystems, we encourage the submission of articles on estuary and marine ecosystems under the same theme. We further welcome original research papers with novel ideas and sound designs, as well as systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

Prof. Dr. Soon-Jin Hwang
Prof. Dr. Min-Ho Jang
Dr. Jongkwon Im
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • eutrophication
  • harmful algal blooms
  • algal dynamics
  • cyanobacteria and other phytoplankton
  • toxins and off-flavor materials
  • ecosystem health and indicators
  • climate change and land use
  • freshwater ecosystems and watershed management
  • conservation and restoration

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 4140 KiB  
Article
Temporal and Seasonal Variations in a Phytoplankton Community Structure in Artificial Lake Uiam, South Korea
by Jong-Kwon Im, Youn-Bo Sim, Soon-Jin Hwang, Myeong-Seop Byeon and Tae-Gu Kang
Water 2023, 15(23), 4118; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15234118 - 28 Nov 2023
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Abstract
Lake Uiam is situated midway through a basin with dams at both the upstream and downstream ends; considerable environmental fluctuations have been observed here. However, studies on changes in environmental factors and plankton community fluctuations remain limited. This study analyzed the seasonal physicochemical [...] Read more.
Lake Uiam is situated midway through a basin with dams at both the upstream and downstream ends; considerable environmental fluctuations have been observed here. However, studies on changes in environmental factors and plankton community fluctuations remain limited. This study analyzed the seasonal physicochemical factors and changes in the phytoplankton community structure in Lake Uiam (2015–2016). Organic matter, phosphorus, total suspended solids (TSS), and Chl-a concentrations were high in the summer. Seasonal changes in the dominant taxa followed the typical succession pattern of temperate phytoplankton, with Bacillariophyceae (Ulnaria acus) being dominant in spring and Cyanophyceae (Pseudanabaena limnetica) dominant in summer. However, Cryptophyceae (Rhodomonas sp.) showed unusually high dominance in autumn. Cell abundance showed no seasonal differences. Rhodomonas sp. was negatively correlated with water temperature, suggesting its dominance in spring and autumn. Cryptophyceae showed a significant correlation with Chl-a (0.708 **), indicating its contribution to spring Chl-a concentrations. Cryptophyceae (Rhodomonas sp. and Cryptomonas spp.) commonly appear in spring but are dominant in autumn in Lake Uiam. Despite disturbances from various environmental factors, they showed higher adaptability than other algae, resulting in their consistent appearance and dominance, differing from the general succession patterns of temperate phytoplankton. Full article
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Review

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22 pages, 2325 KiB  
Review
Survival and Development Strategies of Cyanobacteria through Akinete Formation and Germination in the Life Cycle
by Hye-In Ho, Chae-Hong Park, Kyeong-Eun Yoo, Nan-Young Kim and Soon-Jin Hwang
Water 2024, 16(5), 770; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16050770 - 04 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Eutrophic freshwater ecosystems are vulnerable to toxin-producing cyanobacteria growth or harmful algal blooms. Cyanobacteria belonging to the Nostocales order form akinetes that are similar to the seeds of vascular plants, which are resting cells surrounded by a thick membrane. They overwinter in sediment [...] Read more.
Eutrophic freshwater ecosystems are vulnerable to toxin-producing cyanobacteria growth or harmful algal blooms. Cyanobacteria belonging to the Nostocales order form akinetes that are similar to the seeds of vascular plants, which are resting cells surrounded by a thick membrane. They overwinter in sediment and germinate when conditions become favorable, eventually developing into vegetative cells and causing blooms. This review covers the cyanobacterial akinete of the Nostocales order and summarizes the environmental triggers and cellular responses involved in akinete germination and formation based on data from the literature. It also emphasizes the intimate and dynamic relationship that exists between the germination and formation of akinete in the annual life cycle of cyanobacteria. After comparing many published data, it is found that the tolerance ranges for factors affecting both akinete germination and formation do not differ significantly and are broadly consistent with the tolerance ranges for vegetative cell growth. However, the optimal range varies with different species and strains of cyanobacteria. The life cycle of cyanobacteria, as a result of akinete germination and formation, has a seasonal periodicity and spatial connectivity between the water column and the sediment. However, during the summer growing season, intimate coupling between akinete formation and germination can occur in the water column, and this can contribute to high population densities being maintained in the water column. During this time, shallow sediment could also provide suitable conditions for akinete germination, thereby contributing to the establishment of water column populations. The information summarized in this review is expected to help improve our shared understanding of the life cycle of the Nostocales cyanobacteria while also providing insights into the monitoring and management of harmful algal blooms. Full article
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