Special Issue "New Perspective on Groundwater Contamination Treatment: Bioelectrochemical Systems "

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water and Wastewater Treatment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Andrea G. Capodaglio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Fellow IWA, BCEE, University of Pavia, Italy
Tel. +39 0382 985591/2
Interests: sustainable development, energy and materials recovery, innovative water and wastewater treatment, groundwater contamination, bioelectrochemical systems
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Federico Aulenta
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Research Council of Italy
Tel. +39 0690672751
Interests: anaerobic bioremediation, bioelectrochemical systems, energy and materials recovery from wastes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biolelectrochemical systems are emerging as a new technology with yet unexplored possibilities in the field of soil and groundwater remediation. New technologies for the treatment of industrially contaminated groundwater and soil remediation based on bioelectrochemical systems (BES) or microbial electrochemical technologies (MET) are being proposed, in which “electro-active” bacteria (EAB) catalyse oxidation or reduction reactions using solid-state electrodes, suitably deployed in the contaminated matrix, as virtually inexhaustible electron acceptors or donors, respectively. The development and optimization on a lab scale of such systems focusing on specific industrial contaminants, such as chlorinated hydrocarbons and hydrocarbons, but also including nitrates and heavy metals, have been described in recent literature. The main goals to be achieved include the minimization of energy and chemicals consumption, compared to traditional remediation techniques (biological remediation and physicochemical remediation) and successful and efficient scaling up of such systems startying from laboratory-scals setups from technical, environmental, and economic points of view. Furthermore, the capability of EAB to couple contaminants’ oxidation/reduction to electric current generation holds promise for the development of novel bioelectrochemical sensors for environmental applications, including the real-time monitoring of bioremediation processes.

Contributions are invited for manuscripts describing new innovation models, frameworks, and findings that address new developments and processes in this area, as well as new successful and/or environmentally sustainable applications and concepts, including challenges such as:

- The development of technology with demonstrated feasibility for scaling up

- The development of technology/lab studies concerning a variety of contaminants and groundwater composition

- The development of technology with potential or demonstrated benefits over standard remediation technologies, including energy efficiency, remediation time efficiency, and easy operation

- The development of innovative, whole-cell biosensors for environmental applications, exploiting the extracellular electron transfer capabilities of electroactive bacteria

Prof. Dr. Andrea G. Capodaglio
Dr. Federico Aulenta
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioremediation
  • bioelectrochemical systems
  • biosensors
  • groundwater
  • soil remediation
  • energy
  • remediation technologies

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Operation of a 2-Stage Bioelectrochemical System for Groundwater Denitrification
Water 2019, 11(5), 959; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11050959 - 08 May 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Nitrate groundwater contamination is an issue of global concern that has not been satisfactorily and efficiently addressed, yet. In this study, a 2-stage, sequential bioelectrochemical system (BES) was run to perform autotrophic denitrification of synthetic groundwater. The system was run at a 75.6 [...] Read more.
Nitrate groundwater contamination is an issue of global concern that has not been satisfactorily and efficiently addressed, yet. In this study, a 2-stage, sequential bioelectrochemical system (BES) was run to perform autotrophic denitrification of synthetic groundwater. The system was run at a 75.6 mgNO3-N L−1NCC d−1 nitrate loading rate, achieving almost complete removal of nitrate (>93%) and Total Nitrogen (TN) (>93%). After treatment in the first stage reactor values of effluent nitrate compatible with the EU and USA limits for drinking water (<11.3 and 10 mgNO3-N L−1, respectively) were achieved. Nitrite and nitrous oxide were observed in the first stage’s effluent, and were then successfully removed in the second stage. The observed nitrate removal rate was 73.4 ± 1.3 gNO3-N m−3NCC d−1, while the total nitrogen removal rate was 73.1 ± 1.2 gN m−3NCC d−1. Specific energy consumptions of the system were 0.80 ± 0.00 kWh m−3, 18.80 ± 0.94 kWh kgNO3-N−1 and 18.88 ± 0.95 kWh kgN−1. Combination of two denitrifying BES in series herein described proved to be effective. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Progress Towards Bioelectrochemical Remediation of Hexavalent Chromium
Water 2019, 11(11), 2336; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11112336 - 07 Nov 2019
Abstract
Chromium is one of the most frequently used metal contaminants. Its hexavalent form Cr(VI), which is exploited in many industrial activities, is highly toxic, is water-soluble in the full pH range, and is a major threat to groundwater resources. Alongside traditional approaches to [...] Read more.
Chromium is one of the most frequently used metal contaminants. Its hexavalent form Cr(VI), which is exploited in many industrial activities, is highly toxic, is water-soluble in the full pH range, and is a major threat to groundwater resources. Alongside traditional approaches to Cr(VI) treatment based on physical-chemical methods, technologies exploiting the ability of several microorganisms to reduce toxic and mobile Cr(VI) to the less toxic and stable Cr(III) form have been developed to improve the cost-effectiveness and sustainability of remediating hexavalent chromium-contaminated groundwater. Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs), principally investigated for wastewater treatment, may represent an innovative option for groundwater remediation. By using electrodes as virtually inexhaustible electron donors and acceptors to promote microbial oxidation-reduction reactions, in in situ remediation, BESs may offer the advantage of limited energy and chemicals requirements in comparison to other bioremediation technologies, which rely on external supplies of limiting inorganic nutrients and electron acceptors or donors to ensure proper conditions for microbial activity. Electron transfer is continuously promoted/controlled in terms of current or voltage application between the electrodes, close to which electrochemically active microorganisms are located. Therefore, this enhances the options of process real-time monitoring and control, which are often limited in in situ treatment schemes. This paper reviews research with BESs for treating chromium-contaminated wastewater, by focusing on the perspectives for Cr(VI) bioelectrochemical remediation and open research issues. Full article
Open AccessReview
Bioelectrochemical Systems for Groundwater Remediation: The Development Trend and Research Front Revealed by Bibliometric Analysis
Water 2019, 11(8), 1532; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11081532 - 24 Jul 2019
Abstract
Due to the deficiency of fresh water resources and the deterioration of groundwater quality worldwide, groundwater remedial technologies are especially crucial for preventing groundwater pollution and protecting the precious groundwater resource. Among the remedial alternatives, bioelectrochemical systems have unique advantages on both economic [...] Read more.
Due to the deficiency of fresh water resources and the deterioration of groundwater quality worldwide, groundwater remedial technologies are especially crucial for preventing groundwater pollution and protecting the precious groundwater resource. Among the remedial alternatives, bioelectrochemical systems have unique advantages on both economic and technological aspects. However, it is rare to see a deep study focused on the information mining and visualization of the publications in this field, and research that can reveal and visualize the development trajectory and trends is scarce. Therefore, this study summarizes the published information in this field from the Web of Science Core Collection of the last two decades (1999–2018) and uses Citespace to quantitatively visualize the relationship of authors, published countries, organizations, funding sources, and journals and detect the research front by analyzing keywords and burst terms. The results indicate that the studies focused on bioelectrochemical systems for groundwater remediation have had a significant increase during the last two decades, especially in China, Germany and Italy. The national research institutes and universities of the USA and the countries mentioned above dominate the research. Environmental Science & Technology, Applied and Environmental Microbiology, and Water Research are the most published journals in this field. The network maps of the keywords and burst terms suggest that reductive microbial diversity, electron transfer, microbial fuel cell, etc., are the research hotspots in recent years, and studies focused on microbial enrichment culture, energy supply/recovery, combined pollution remediation, etc., should be enhanced in future. Full article
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