Special Issue "AOP Processes for Organics Removal in Water and Wastewater"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Wastewater Treatment and Reuse".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jiangyong Hu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576, Singapore
Interests: advanced oxidation process; emerging contaminants detection and removal; water disinfection technology; biofilm control; storm water management
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Say Leong Ong
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576, Singapore
Interests: water quality enhancement; water reclamation and reuse; membrane technology for water and wastewater treatment; biotreatment processes; sustainable urban water resources management; modelling of water quality enhancement systems
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Wenjun Sun
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
Interests: UV disinfection; UV advanced oxidation process; advanced treatment process for water and wastewater
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Weiling Sun
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, China
Interests: environmental chemistry; water treatment technology; fate and transformation of PPCPs and EDCs

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water and wastewater contain varying levels of recalcitrant and potentially toxic organic compounds, which necessitates effective treatment prior to final disposal or reuse. At present, advanced oxidation processes (AOP) have gained considerable attention from water professionals due to their ability to rapidly and effectively remove organics and transform them into harmless products.

In view of the above observation, this Special Issue will focus on manuscripts (research papers, reviews, short communications) related to the research and development, policy, implementation, and management of AOP for organics removal in water and wastewater treatment.

Manuscripts in this Special Issue are expected to interpret the results of water quality and cost analysis of AOP process studies within the context of organic pollutant removal and control by evaluating such issues as treatment performance, novel materials and process development, transformation products and pathways, and any other potential impacts in water and wastewater management.

Prof. Dr. Jiangyong Hu
Prof. Dr. Say Leong Ong
Dr. Wenjun Sun
Dr. Weiling Sun
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Advanced oxidation process
  • Organics removal
  • Transformation products
  • Toxicity evaluation
  • Pre- and post- process
  • Water and wastewater treatment
  • Cost-Effectiveness analysis
  • Policy and management

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Research about Organic Matter Removal and Biofilms Development of Pilot-Scale UV/H2O2-BAC Process
Water 2021, 13(4), 565; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13040565 - 23 Feb 2021
Viewed by 521
Abstract
As a green advanced process for drinking water treatment, the UV/hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2) process has been gradually applied in China. To study the effect and mechanism of organic matter removal and the development of microbial communities in the UV/H [...] Read more.
As a green advanced process for drinking water treatment, the UV/hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2) process has been gradually applied in China. To study the effect and mechanism of organic matter removal and the development of microbial communities in the UV/H2O2-biological activated carbon (UV/H2O2-BAC) process, a pilot-scale UV/H2O2-BAC system was built and operated over one year. Low water temperature affects the UV/H2O2 process efficiency, the biofilms in the BAC system were mature and stable after 240 days, and the contribution rate of BAC adsorption to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal was approximately 14.2% after one year of operation. The liquid chromatography-organic carbon detection (LC-OCD) analysis shows that UV/H2O2 process can increase the amounts of Low Molecular Weight (LMW) neutrals, and the specific UV absorbance (SUVA254) value is not suitable for predicting Trihalomethanes (THMs) precursor contents in water after UV/H2O2 treatment. High-throughput sequencing results prove that microbial species in the middle section are the most abundant compared to those in the influent and effluent sections, hydrogen peroxide has lower inhibition on the development of microbial community than ozone and the low concentration of hydrogen peroxide (<0.25 mg/L) promotes the development of the microbial communities, hydrogen peroxide can reduce Proteobacteria abundance by inhibiting the growth of anaerobes. Acidobacteria may have a certain contribution to the degradation of soil organic matter (SOM), and the effluent section of BAC with low DOC concentration cannot form the dominant species of Rhodobacter. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue AOP Processes for Organics Removal in Water and Wastewater)
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Article
Treatment of Bio-Treated Coking Wastewater by Catalytic Ozonation with Semi-Batch and Continuous Flow Reactors
Water 2020, 12(9), 2532; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12092532 - 10 Sep 2020
Viewed by 611
Abstract
In this work, the treatment of bio-treated coking wastewater (BCW) by catalytic ozonation was conducted in semi-batch and continuous flow reactors. The kinetics of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were analyzed using BCWs from five coking plants. An integral reactor with catalytic ozonation [...] Read more.
In this work, the treatment of bio-treated coking wastewater (BCW) by catalytic ozonation was conducted in semi-batch and continuous flow reactors. The kinetics of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were analyzed using BCWs from five coking plants. An integral reactor with catalytic ozonation stacked by ozone absorption (IR) was developed, and its efficiency was studied. The catalyst of MnxCe1-xO2/γ-Al2O3 was efficient in the catalytic ozonation process for the treatment of various BCWs. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies after 120 min reaction were 64–74%. The overall apparent reaction rate constants were 0.0101–0.0117 min−1, which has no obvious relationship with the initial COD of BCW and pre-treatment biological process. The IR demonstrated the highest efficiency due to the enhancement of mass transfer and the utilization efficiency of ozone. Bypass internal circulation can further improve the reactor efficiency. The optimal results were obtained with the ozone absorption section accounting for 19% of the valid water depth in the reactor and 250% of circulation flow ratio. The long-term and full-scale application of the novel reactor in a continuous mode indicated stable removal of COD and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The results showed that the system of IR is a promising reactor type for tertiary treatment of coking wastewater by catalytic ozonation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue AOP Processes for Organics Removal in Water and Wastewater)
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Article
Removal of 17β-Estradiol by Activated Charcoal Supported Titanate Nanotubes ([email protected]) through Initial Adsorption and Subsequent Photo-Degradation: Intermediates, DFT calculation, and Mechanisms
Water 2020, 12(8), 2121; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12082121 - 26 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 768
Abstract
A low-cost composite of activated charcoal supported titanate nanotubes ([email protected]) was developed via the facile hydrothermal method to remove the 17β-estradiol (E2, a model of pharmaceutical and personal care products) in water matrix by initial adsorption and subsequent photo-degradation. Characterizations indicated that the [...] Read more.
A low-cost composite of activated charcoal supported titanate nanotubes ([email protected]) was developed via the facile hydrothermal method to remove the 17β-estradiol (E2, a model of pharmaceutical and personal care products) in water matrix by initial adsorption and subsequent photo-degradation. Characterizations indicated that the modification occurred, i.e., the titanate nanotubes would be grafted onto the activated charcoal (AC) surface, and the micro-carbon could modify the tubular structure of TNTs. E2 was rapidly adsorbed onto [email protected], and the uptake reached 1.87 mg/g from the dual-mode model fitting. Subsequently, the adsorbed E2 could be degraded 99.8% within 2 h under ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation. [email protected] was attributed with a unique hybrid structure, providing the hydrophobic effect, π−π interaction, and capillary condensation for E2 adsorption, and facilitating the electron transfer and then enhancing photocatalytic ability for E2-degradation. In addition, the removal mechanism of E2 was elucidated through the density functional theory calculation. Our study is expected to provide a promising material for environmental application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue AOP Processes for Organics Removal in Water and Wastewater)
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Article
Photolytic Degradation of Tetracycline in the Presence of Ca(II) and/or Humic Acid
Water 2020, 12(8), 2078; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12082078 - 22 Jul 2020
Viewed by 614
Abstract
Photolytic degradation of tetracycline (TC) was investigated in mono- and binary solute systems of Ca(II) and humic acid (HA) under UVA light emitting diode (UVA-LED) light irradiation. TC photolysis proceeded via pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. The presence of Ca(II) significantly accelerated the degradation rate [...] Read more.
Photolytic degradation of tetracycline (TC) was investigated in mono- and binary solute systems of Ca(II) and humic acid (HA) under UVA light emitting diode (UVA-LED) light irradiation. TC photolysis proceeded via pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. The presence of Ca(II) significantly accelerated the degradation rate constants of TC, with the highest value at 0.0314 ± 0.0019 min−1 when the Ca(II) concentration was 5.0 mM. The promoted degradation was attributed to complexation of TC with Ca(II), which increased the light absorption. Absorbance and fluorescence measurements revealed that the strong complexation between TC and Ca(II) likely occurred via the C11 and C12 oxygen groups in the phenolic-diketone moiety of TC in nearly neutral solutions. The formation of HA-Ca(II) complex was found in the binary solute system of HA and Ca(II). Thus, the promotional effect of Ca(II) on photolysis was diminished by HA addition. The largest reduction of 32.5% in rate constants was observed with the highest Ca(II) concentration. Scavenger studies revealed that TC could undergo direct photolysis and self-sensitization by 1O2. These results suggest that the coexistence of HA and Ca(II) greatly influences the fate of TC in natural waters, which has important implications for understanding the behavior of antibiotics coexisting with other metal species and ligands. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue AOP Processes for Organics Removal in Water and Wastewater)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

     1. Dr. Chun Zhao from Chongqing University will have an original research article.

Title: Degradation of diclofenac in urine by electro-permanganate process driven by microbial fuel cells

Abstract: A novel microbial fuel cell assisted electro-permanganate process (MFC-PM) was proposed for the enhanced degradation of diclofenac (DCF). Through the utilization of environmentally friendly bio-electricity in situ, the MFC-PM process could actualize the simultaneous anodic biological metabolism of urea and cathodic electro-permanganate process. Density functional theory calculations and experiments evidences revealed that the reactive manganese species (RMnS) was generated via single electron transfer in the cathodic camber. Mn(VII)aq, Mn(VI)aq, Mn(V)aq, and Mn(III)aq were all contributed to DCF degradation. Biological detection revealed that clostridia was the primary electron donor in anode chamber in anaerobic environment. Furthermore, the electricity generation performance and removal of DCF in different operation conditions were evaluated. The removal efficiency of DCF increased with lower external resistances, higher PM dosage, and lower catholyte pH. A maximum output power density of 1.49 W m-3 and the optimal removal of 94.75% DCF in 20 min were obtained. In addition, the MFC-PM process displayed excellent applicability in different background substances. The MFC-PM process may provide an efficient and energy-free bio-electricity catalytic permanganate oxidation technology for the enhanced degradation of emerging contaminants in urine via the in situ generation of RMnS.

Keywords: microbial fuel cells, electricity generation, electro-permanganate, reactive manganese species, urine treatment

     3. Dr. Ziming Zhao from Tsinghua University will have an original research article.

Tentative Title: ANN Method for UV-AOP System Operation Control

     4. Dr. Hao Wu from Tsinghua University will have an original research article.

Tentative Title: VUV Technology Applications for AOP Process of Water Treatment

 5. Reviewer paper from Guest Editor team

Emerging contaminants: an overview on the occurrence, recent trends for light-driven processes for its treatment and management
B.C.Y. Lee, F.Y.Lim, W.H. Loh, S.L. Ong and J.Y. Hu

Abstract: The occurrence of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) in water bodies is particularly challenging due to the detection of the compounds and the recalcitrant nature of the contaminants to conventional treatment. The distribution and contamination level of CECs are also affected by global shifts and would require constant monitoring and testing of technology for the effectiveness of treatment. In this review, CECs are characterized to give insights into the potential degradation performance of similar compounds, hence giving precedence to potential future contaminants. An overview of the occurrence and fate of pollutants would then give insights into treatment and management strategies. A two-pronged approach was then proposed for the overall mitigation of CECs. Various light-driven oxidation processes were discussed namely, photo/Fenton, photocatalysis, photolysis, UV/Ozone to give insights into the potential for large-scale application of CECs treatment. An overview of advances to overcome current limitations in light-driven processes for CECs mitigation was carried out, focusing on trends and innovation in the recent years. The new technology that reduces the bottlenecks of current light-driven processes was also be highlighted and discussed. Light-based detection methodology was also discussed for the management of CECs. Lastly, cost-benefit analysis on various light-based processes was conducted to access the suitability for CECs degradation. It was found that the UV/Ozone process might not be suitable due to the complication with pH adjustments and limited light wavelength. It was found that EEO values were in this sequence: Solar/Fenton < UV/Oxidant < UV/Fenton < UV/O3 < Photocatalyst < UV only. Solar/Fenton process has the least computed EEO <5 kWh m-3 and great potential for further development. Newer innovations like Solar/Catalyst can also be explored with potentially lowered EEO values.

 

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