Special Issue "AOP Processes for Organics Removal in Water and Wastewater"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Wastewater Treatment and Reuse".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jiangyong Hu
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National University of Singapore, 1 Engineering Drive 2, E1A 07-03, Singapore 117576
Interests: advanced oxidation process; emerging contaminants detection and removal; water disinfection technology; biofilm control; storm water management
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Say Leong Ong
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576, Singapore
Interests: water quality enhancement; water reclamation and reuse; membrane technology for water and wastewater treatment; biotreatment processes; sustainable urban water resources management; modelling of water quality enhancement systems
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Wenjun Sun
Website
Guest Editor
School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
Interests: UV disinfection and advanced oxidation process; advanced drinking water technology; industrial water treatment technology
Dr. Weiling Sun
Website
Guest Editor
College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, China
Interests: environmental chemistry; water treatment technology; fate and transformation of PPCPs and EDCs

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water and wastewater contain varying levels of recalcitrant and potentially toxic organic compounds, which necessitates effective treatment prior to final disposal or reuse. At present, advanced oxidation processes (AOP) have gained considerable attention from water professionals due to their ability to rapidly and effectively remove organics and transform them into harmless products.

In view of the above observation, this Special Issue will focus on manuscripts (research papers, reviews, short communications) related to the research and development, policy, implementation, and management of AOP for organics removal in water and wastewater treatment.

Manuscripts in this Special Issue are expected to interpret the results of water quality and cost analysis of AOP process studies within the context of organic pollutant removal and control by evaluating such issues as treatment performance, novel materials and process development, transformation products and pathways, and any other potential impacts in water and wastewater management.

Prof. Dr. Jiangyong Hu
Prof. Dr. Say Leong Ong
Dr. Wenjun Sun
Dr. Weiling Sun
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Advanced oxidation process
  • Organics removal
  • Transformation products
  • Toxicity evaluation
  • Pre- and post- process
  • Water and wastewater treatment
  • Cost-Effectiveness analysis
  • Policy and management

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Removal of 17β-Estradiol by Activated Charcoal Supported Titanate Nanotubes ([email protected]) through Initial Adsorption and Subsequent Photo-Degradation: Intermediates, DFT calculation, and Mechanisms
Water 2020, 12(8), 2121; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12082121 - 26 Jul 2020
Abstract
A low-cost composite of activated charcoal supported titanate nanotubes ([email protected]) was developed via the facile hydrothermal method to remove the 17β-estradiol (E2, a model of pharmaceutical and personal care products) in water matrix by initial adsorption and subsequent photo-degradation. Characterizations indicated that the [...] Read more.
A low-cost composite of activated charcoal supported titanate nanotubes ([email protected]) was developed via the facile hydrothermal method to remove the 17β-estradiol (E2, a model of pharmaceutical and personal care products) in water matrix by initial adsorption and subsequent photo-degradation. Characterizations indicated that the modification occurred, i.e., the titanate nanotubes would be grafted onto the activated charcoal (AC) surface, and the micro-carbon could modify the tubular structure of TNTs. E2 was rapidly adsorbed onto [email protected], and the uptake reached 1.87 mg/g from the dual-mode model fitting. Subsequently, the adsorbed E2 could be degraded 99.8% within 2 h under ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation. [email protected] was attributed with a unique hybrid structure, providing the hydrophobic effect, π−π interaction, and capillary condensation for E2 adsorption, and facilitating the electron transfer and then enhancing photocatalytic ability for E2-degradation. In addition, the removal mechanism of E2 was elucidated through the density functional theory calculation. Our study is expected to provide a promising material for environmental application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue AOP Processes for Organics Removal in Water and Wastewater)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Photolytic Degradation of Tetracycline in the Presence of Ca(II) and/or Humic Acid
Water 2020, 12(8), 2078; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12082078 - 22 Jul 2020
Abstract
Photolytic degradation of tetracycline (TC) was investigated in mono- and binary solute systems of Ca(II) and humic acid (HA) under UVA light emitting diode (UVA-LED) light irradiation. TC photolysis proceeded via pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. The presence of Ca(II) significantly accelerated the degradation rate [...] Read more.
Photolytic degradation of tetracycline (TC) was investigated in mono- and binary solute systems of Ca(II) and humic acid (HA) under UVA light emitting diode (UVA-LED) light irradiation. TC photolysis proceeded via pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. The presence of Ca(II) significantly accelerated the degradation rate constants of TC, with the highest value at 0.0314 ± 0.0019 min−1 when the Ca(II) concentration was 5.0 mM. The promoted degradation was attributed to complexation of TC with Ca(II), which increased the light absorption. Absorbance and fluorescence measurements revealed that the strong complexation between TC and Ca(II) likely occurred via the C11 and C12 oxygen groups in the phenolic-diketone moiety of TC in nearly neutral solutions. The formation of HA-Ca(II) complex was found in the binary solute system of HA and Ca(II). Thus, the promotional effect of Ca(II) on photolysis was diminished by HA addition. The largest reduction of 32.5% in rate constants was observed with the highest Ca(II) concentration. Scavenger studies revealed that TC could undergo direct photolysis and self-sensitization by 1O2. These results suggest that the coexistence of HA and Ca(II) greatly influences the fate of TC in natural waters, which has important implications for understanding the behavior of antibiotics coexisting with other metal species and ligands. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue AOP Processes for Organics Removal in Water and Wastewater)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

      1. Dr. Chun Zhao from Chongqing University will have an oringnal research article.

      2. Dr. Wuchang Song from Shandong Province City Water Supply and Drainage Water Quality Monitoring Center will have an oringnal research article.

Tentative Title: Chlorine Attenuation and Trihalomethane Formation in Drinking Water after UV/H2O2-Clorination Treatment

     3. Dr. Ziming Zhao from Tsinghua University will have an oringnal research article.

Tentative Title: ANN Method for UV-AOP System Operation Control

     4. Dr. Hao Wu from Tsinghua University will have an oringnal research article.

Tentative Title: VUV Technology Applications for AOP Process of Water Treatment

Back to TopTop