Special Issue "Bats and Coronaviruses"

A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Peng Zhou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071, China
Interests: bat virus infection and immunity; virus host interaction; SARS-CoV
Dr. Danielle E. Anderson
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne, Australia
Interests: virus host interaction; paramyxoviruses; coronaviruses, zoonosis, infectious disease

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the past two decades, three high pathogenic coronaviruses have been identified as the causal agents of large-scale disease outbreaks—SARS-CoV-1, MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2—that have claimed tens of thousands of human lives. One of the shared characters between these three viruses is that they all probably originated in bats, which firmly establishes that bats are an important source of highly lethal zoonotic viruses. Thus, it is highly likely that future SARS-like coronavirus outbreaks will originate from bats. While it is almost impossible to predict or prevent the next coronavirus outbreak, we believe that active surveillance is the best we can do at the present time to provide early warnings and, in turn, minimize the impact of such future outbreaks. As a successful example, the identification of bat HKU2-related coronavirus led us to quickly set up diagnosis and control measures against swine disease outbreak caused by SARS-CoV, which shared 95% genome identity to HKU2-CoV. In addition, it is increasingly important to understand why bats can maintain coronaviruses long-term without showing clinical symptoms of diseases. In this regard, global efforts on the discovery and active surveillance of bat coronaviruses, and on understanding of the relationship between bats and coronaviruses are urgently needed. This is also within the scope of this Special Issue “Bats and Coronaviruses”.

Prof. Dr. Peng Zhou
Guest Editor
Dr. Danielle E. Anderson
Co-Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • SARS-CoV-1
  • MERS-CoV
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • bat coronaviruses

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Egyptian Fruit Bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) Were Resistant to Experimental Inoculation with Avian-Origin Influenza A Virus of Subtype H9N2, But Are Susceptible to Experimental Infection with Bat-Borne H9N2 Virus
Viruses 2021, 13(4), 672; https://doi.org/10.3390/v13040672 - 14 Apr 2021
Viewed by 679
Abstract
Influenza A viruses (IAV) of subtype H9N2, endemic in world-wide poultry holdings, are reported to cause spill-over infections to pigs and humans and have also contributed substantially to recent reassortment-derived pre-pandemic zoonotic viruses of concern, such as the Asian H7N9 viruses. Recently, a [...] Read more.
Influenza A viruses (IAV) of subtype H9N2, endemic in world-wide poultry holdings, are reported to cause spill-over infections to pigs and humans and have also contributed substantially to recent reassortment-derived pre-pandemic zoonotic viruses of concern, such as the Asian H7N9 viruses. Recently, a H9N2 bat influenza A virus was found in Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus), raising the question of whether this bat species is a suitable host for IAV. Here, we studied the susceptibility, pathogenesis and transmission of avian and bat-related H9N2 viruses in this new host. In a first experiment, we oronasally inoculated six Egyptian fruit bats with an avian-related H9N2 virus (A/layer chicken/Bangladesh/VP02-plaque/2016 (H9N2)). In a second experiment, six Egyptian fruit bats were inoculated with the newly discovered bat-related H9N2 virus (A/bat/Egypt/381OP/2017 (H9N2)). While R. aegyptiacus turned out to be refractory to an infection with H9N2 avian-type, inoculation with the bat H9N2 subtype established a productive infection in all inoculated animals with a detectable seroconversion at day 21 post-infection. In conclusion, Egyptian fruit bats are most likely not susceptible to the avian H9N2 subtype, but can be infected with fruit bat-derived H9N2. H9-specific sero-reactivities in fruit bats in the field are therefore more likely the result of contact with a bat-adapted H9N2 strain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bats and Coronaviruses)
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