Special Issue "Neuropeptides: Role and Function in Species of Veterinary Interest"

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Biomedical Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2022) | Viewed by 5697

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Lucianna Maruccio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Productions, (MVPA), University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy
Interests: zebrafish; neurotrophins; Uncaria tomentosa; Lepidium meyenii (Maca); reproduction system; digestive system; feline; Japanese quail; marine mammals; food intake
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Carla Lucini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Productions, (MVPA), University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy
Interests: gut; pancreas; brain; fish; neuroanatomy; immunohistochemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Neuropeptides, being highly conserved during evolution, lend themselves to comparative and evolutionary studies. Due to their primary amino acid structure, neuropeptides are classified into several families. Thus, they can play different functional roles in organs and/or tissues of the same animal species, but above all between different species and classes. Furthermore, the explosion of research activity in this field has led to the identification of numerous endogenous naturally occurring peptides that act as neurotransmitters and neuromodulators or trophic factors that act as mediators of nervous system functions.

Original manuscripts, review articles, and short communications and comments on neuropeptides in animals of veterinary interest are invited in this Special Issue. Multidisciplinary works will be prioritized.

Dr. Lucianna Maruccio
Prof. Dr. Carla Lucini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • neuropeptides
  • neurotransmitters
  • trophic factors
  • vertebrates

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Analysis of the Expression of Neurotrophins and Their Receptors in Adult Zebrafish Kidney
Vet. Sci. 2022, 9(6), 296; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci9060296 - 15 Jun 2022
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Abstract
Neurotrophins and their receptors are involved in the development and maintenance of neuronal populations. Different reports have shown that all neurotrophin/receptor pathways can also play a role in several non-neuronal tissues in vertebrates, including the kidney. These signaling pathways are involved in different [...] Read more.
Neurotrophins and their receptors are involved in the development and maintenance of neuronal populations. Different reports have shown that all neurotrophin/receptor pathways can also play a role in several non-neuronal tissues in vertebrates, including the kidney. These signaling pathways are involved in different events to ensure the correct functioning of the kidney, such as growth, differentiation, and regulation of renal tubule transport. Previous studies in some fish species have identified the neurotrophins and receptors in the kidney. In this study, for the first time, we compare the expression profiles (mRNA and protein) of all neurotrophin/receptor pathways in the kidney of the adult zebrafish. We quantify the levels of mRNA by using qPCR and identify the expression pattern of each neurotrophin/receptor pathway by in situ hybridization. Next, we detect the proteins using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Our results show that among all neurotrophins analyzed, NT-3/TrkC is the most expressed in the glomerule and tubule and in the hematopoietic cells, similar to what has been reported in the mammalian kidney. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuropeptides: Role and Function in Species of Veterinary Interest)
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Article
Changes in Neuropeptide Prohormone Genes among Cetartiodactyla Livestock and Wild Species Associated with Evolution and Domestication
Vet. Sci. 2022, 9(5), 247; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci9050247 - 23 May 2022
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Abstract
The impact of evolution and domestication processes on the sequences of neuropeptide prohormone genes that participate in cell–cell signaling influences multiple biological process that involve neuropeptide signaling. This information is important to understand the physiological differences between Cetartiodactyla domesticated species such as cow, [...] Read more.
The impact of evolution and domestication processes on the sequences of neuropeptide prohormone genes that participate in cell–cell signaling influences multiple biological process that involve neuropeptide signaling. This information is important to understand the physiological differences between Cetartiodactyla domesticated species such as cow, pig, and llama and wild species such as hippopotamus, giraffes, and whales. Systematic analysis of changes associated with evolutionary and domestication forces in neuropeptide prohormone protein sequences that are processed into neuropeptides was undertaken. The genomes from 118 Cetartiodactyla genomes representing 22 families were mined for 98 neuropeptide prohormone genes. Compared to other Cetartiodactyla suborders, Ruminantia preserved PYY2 and lost RLN1. Changes in GNRH2, IAPP, INSL6, POMC, PRLH, and TAC4 protein sequences could result in the loss of some bioactive neuropeptides in some families. An evolutionary model suggested that most neuropeptide prohormone genes disfavor sequence changes that incorporate large and hydrophobic amino acids. A compelling finding was that differences between domestic and wild species are associated with the molecular system underlying ‘fight or flight’ responses. Overall, the results demonstrate the importance of simultaneously comparing the neuropeptide prohormone gene complement from close and distant-related species. These findings broaden the foundation for empirical studies about the function of the neuropeptidome associated with health, behavior, and food production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuropeptides: Role and Function in Species of Veterinary Interest)
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Article
Expression of Nerve Growth Factor and Its Receptor TrkA in the Reproductive System of Adult Zebrafish
Vet. Sci. 2022, 9(5), 225; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci9050225 - 06 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1242
Abstract
Nerve growth factor (NGF), a member of the neurotrophin family, has emerged as an active mediator in different crucial events in the peripheral and central nervous system. At the same time, several studies showed that this neurotrophin can also play a role in [...] Read more.
Nerve growth factor (NGF), a member of the neurotrophin family, has emerged as an active mediator in different crucial events in the peripheral and central nervous system. At the same time, several studies showed that this neurotrophin can also play a role in non-neuronal tissues (e.g., among gonads). In spite of a large number of studies present in mammals, investigations devoted to NGF and its receptor TrkA in the reproductive system of other animal models, such as teleost fish, are scarce. To increase our knowledge of NGF and its receptor in a vertebrate gonads model, the present report describes the expression patterns of ngf and trka mRNA in the testis and ovary of adult zebrafish. By using chromogenic and fluorescence in situ hybridization, we demonstrate that in the testis of adult zebrafish, ngf and its receptor trka are mainly expressed in spermatogony B and spermatocytes. In the ovary of this fish, ngf and trka are expressed at different stages of oocyte development. Altogether, these results show that this neurotrophin and its receptor have an important role in the reproductive system that is conserved during vertebrate evolution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuropeptides: Role and Function in Species of Veterinary Interest)
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Review

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Review
Avian Neuropeptide Y: Beyond Feed Intake Regulation
Vet. Sci. 2022, 9(4), 171; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci9040171 - 01 Apr 2022
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Abstract
Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant and ubiquitously expressed neuropeptides in both the central and peripheral nervous systems, and its regulatory effects on feed intake and appetite- have been extensively studied in a wide variety of animals, including mammalian and [...] Read more.
Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant and ubiquitously expressed neuropeptides in both the central and peripheral nervous systems, and its regulatory effects on feed intake and appetite- have been extensively studied in a wide variety of animals, including mammalian and non-mammalian species. Indeed, NPY has been shown to be involved in the regulation of feed intake and energy homeostasis by exerting stimulatory effects on appetite and feeding behavior in several species including chickens, rabbits, rats and mouse. More recent studies have shown that this neuropeptide and its receptors are expressed in various peripheral tissues, including the thyroid, heart, spleen, adrenal glands, white adipose tissue, muscle and bone. Although well researched centrally, studies investigating the distribution and function of peripherally expressed NPY in avian (non-mammalian vertebrates) species are very limited. Thus, peripherally expressed NPY merits more consideration and further in-depth exploration to fully elucidate its functions, especially in non-mammalian species. The aim of the current review is to provide an integrated synopsis of both centrally and peripherally expressed NPY, with a special focus on the distribution and function of the latter. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuropeptides: Role and Function in Species of Veterinary Interest)
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Review
Avian Orexin: Feed Intake Regulator or Something Else?
Vet. Sci. 2022, 9(3), 112; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci9030112 - 03 Mar 2022
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Abstract
Originally named for its expression in the posterior hypothalamus in rats and after the Greek word for “appetite”, hypocretin, or orexin, as it is known today, gained notoriety as a neuropeptide regulating feeding behavior, energy homeostasis, and sleep. Orexin has been proven to [...] Read more.
Originally named for its expression in the posterior hypothalamus in rats and after the Greek word for “appetite”, hypocretin, or orexin, as it is known today, gained notoriety as a neuropeptide regulating feeding behavior, energy homeostasis, and sleep. Orexin has been proven to be involved in both central and peripheral control of neuroendocrine functions, energy balance, and metabolism. Since its discovery, its ability to increase appetite as well as regulate feeding behavior has been widely explored in mammalian food production animals such as cattle, pigs, and sheep. It is also linked to neurological disorders, leading to its intensive investigation in humans regarding narcolepsy, depression, and Alzheimer’s disease. However, in non-mammalian species, research is limited. In the case of avian species, orexin has been shown to have no central effect on feed-intake, however it was found to be involved in muscle energy metabolism and hepatic lipogenesis. This review provides current knowledge and summarizes orexin’s physiological roles in livestock and pinpoints the present lacuna to facilitate further investigations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuropeptides: Role and Function in Species of Veterinary Interest)
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