Feature Papers

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2012) | Viewed by 25874

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Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48104, USA
Interests: cervical cancer prevention; HPV vaccine, HPV prevention; HPV cure; CIN detection; CIN cure; quality of life; shared decision making; communications
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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
The Potential Impact of Preventive HIV Vaccines in China: Results and Benefits of a Multi-Province Modeling Collaboration
by Thomas Harmon, Wei Guo, John Stover, Zunyou Wu, Joan Kaufman, Kammerle Schneider, Li Liu, Liao Feng and Bernard Schwartländer
Vaccines 2015, 3(1), 1-19; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines3010001 - 5 Jan 2015
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 8698
Abstract
China’s commitment to implementing established and emerging HIV/AIDS prevention and control strategies has led to substantial gains in terms of access to antiretroviral treatment and prevention services, but the evolving and multifaceted HIV/AIDS epidemic in China highlights the challenges of maintaining that response. [...] Read more.
China’s commitment to implementing established and emerging HIV/AIDS prevention and control strategies has led to substantial gains in terms of access to antiretroviral treatment and prevention services, but the evolving and multifaceted HIV/AIDS epidemic in China highlights the challenges of maintaining that response. This study presents modeling results exploring the potential impact of HIV vaccines in the Chinese context at varying efficacy and coverage rates, while further exploring the potential implications of vaccination programs aimed at reaching populations at highest risk of HIV infection. A preventive HIV vaccine would add a powerful tool to China’s response, even if not 100% efficacious or available to the full population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
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763 KiB  
Article
Factors Affecting the Acceptance of Pandemic Influenza A H1N1 Vaccine amongst Essential Service Providers: A Cross Sectional Study
by Alice Beattie, Katie Palmer, Emily Rees, Zoe Riddell, Charlotte Roberts and Rachel Jordan
Vaccines 2013, 1(1), 17-33; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines1010017 - 20 Dec 2012
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 8183
Abstract
Although mentioned in the UK pandemic plan, essential service providers were not among the priority groups. They may be important targets of future influenza pandemic vaccination campaigns. Therefore, we conducted a cross-sectional survey among 380 employees from West Midlands police headquarters and 15 [...] Read more.
Although mentioned in the UK pandemic plan, essential service providers were not among the priority groups. They may be important targets of future influenza pandemic vaccination campaigns. Therefore, we conducted a cross-sectional survey among 380 employees from West Midlands police headquarters and 15 operational command units in the West Midlands Area during December 2009–February 2010 to identify factors affecting intention to accept the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine. One hundred and ninety nine (52.4%) employees completed the questionnaire. 39.7% were willing to accept the vaccine. The most common reasons for intention to accept were worry about catching Swine Flu (n = 42, 53.2%) and about infecting others (n = 40, 50.6%). The most common reason for declination was worry about side effects (n = 45, 57.0%). The most important factor predicting vaccine uptake was previous receipt of seasonal vaccine (OR 7.9 (95% CI 3.4, 18.5)). Employees aged <40 years, males, current smokers, and those who perceived a greater threat and severity of swine flu were also more likely to agree to the vaccine. The findings of this study could be used to improve future pandemic immunization strategies. Targeted education programs should be used to address misconceptions; the single most important factor which might lead to a large improvement in uptake is to allay concern about side effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
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Review
Tumor-Associated Glycans and Immune Surveillance
by Behjatolah Monzavi-Karbassi, Anastas Pashov and Thomas Kieber-Emmons
Vaccines 2013, 1(2), 174-203; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines1020174 - 17 Jun 2013
Cited by 44 | Viewed by 8462
Abstract
Changes in cell surface glycosylation are a hallmark of the transition from normal to inflamed and neoplastic tissue. Tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) challenge our understanding of immune tolerance, while functioning as immune targets that bridge innate immune surveillance and adaptive antitumor immunity in [...] Read more.
Changes in cell surface glycosylation are a hallmark of the transition from normal to inflamed and neoplastic tissue. Tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) challenge our understanding of immune tolerance, while functioning as immune targets that bridge innate immune surveillance and adaptive antitumor immunity in clinical applications. T-cells, being a part of the adaptive immune response, are the most popular component of the immune system considered for targeting tumor cells. However, for TACAs, T-cells take a back seat to antibodies and natural killer cells as first-line innate defense mechanisms. Here, we briefly highlight the rationale associated with the relative importance of the immune surveillance machinery that might be applicable for developing therapeutics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
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