Special Issue "Flaviviruses: Immunity and Vaccine Development"

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X). This special issue belongs to the section "Vaccines against (re)emerging and Tropical Infections Diseases".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2022 | Viewed by 503

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Wildriss Viranaicken
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
PIMIT, Processus Infectieux en Milieu Insulaire Tropical, Université de La Réunion, INSERM UMR 1187, CNRS 9192, IRD 249, Plateforme CYROI, 97490 Sainte-Clotilde, Ile de La Réunion, France
Interests: host-pathogen interaction; flavivirus; PAMPs; Innate immunity; antiviral response; live attenuated vaccines; antigen design and production; host-targeted antiviral
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Pascale Krejbich
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
PIMIT, Processus Infectieux en Milieu Insulaire Tropical, Université de La Réunion, INSERM UMR 1187, CNRS 9192, IRD 249, Plateforme CYROI, 97490 Sainte-Clotilde, Ile de La Réunion, France
Interests: virus-host interaction; arboviroses; programmed cell death; cell antiviral responses; red queen effect
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The COVID pandemic is a reminder of how vulnerable the world's population is to zoonotic RNA viruses of medical concern.  Among the viruses most likely to emerge and re-emerge is the arthropod-borne flavivirus family, which includes dangerous pathogens that currently infect hundreds of millions of people per year. The dengue virus (DENV), West Nile (WNV), yellow fever (YFV), Zika (ZIKV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), and Usutu virus (USUV) are well known members of the flavivirus family. They are responsible for a wide range of potentially serious visceral, neurotropic, and congenital diseases, as well as fetal death. With global warming and the expansion of vector distribution areas, these viruses are representing a growing threat to worldwide health.

The onset of immune responses is critical to the outcome of infection, pathogenesis, and the specific abilities of these viruses for crossing the placental and blood–brain barriers.

It has been shown that while innate immunity and IFN responses limit flavivirus infections, some of these viruses have strategies for bypassing antiviral cellular programs. Cellular and adaptive immunity are also important, and their thorough understanding should be taken into account in the design of a vaccine. Infections with flaviviruses are, for example, subject to the phenomenon of ADE in secondary infection situations. A candidate vaccine must, therefore, be able to avoid inducing this type of response in humans. It must also be able to be used by the most vulnerable populations, such as newborns or pregnant women.

The purpose of this Special Issue, titled “Flavivirus: Immunity and Vaccine Development”, is to present the latest research results, hypothesis, and points of view on the field of flaviviruses–host interactions and conception of vaccine strategies. It is likely to be of interest to a wide range of translational researchers, virologists, cell and molecular biologists, physicians, etc.

Dr. Wildriss Viranaicken
Dr. Pascale Krejbich
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • flavivirus
  • cell host responses
  • adaptive and innate immunity
  • severe forms
  • viral pathogenesis
  • vaccines

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Communication
Dynamics of Whole Virus and Non-Structural Protein 1 (NS1) IgG Response in Mice Immunized with Two Commercial Tick-Borne Encephalitis Vaccines
Vaccines 2022, 10(7), 1001; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10071001 - 23 Jun 2022
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Abstract
The presence of a non-structural protein 1 (NS1) in tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccines and the possible induction of an NS1-specific immune response in vaccinated individuals remains a somewhat controversial topic. Previously, we detected the presence of NS1 in the Encepur TBE vaccine by [...] Read more.
The presence of a non-structural protein 1 (NS1) in tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccines and the possible induction of an NS1-specific immune response in vaccinated individuals remains a somewhat controversial topic. Previously, we detected the presence of NS1 in the Encepur TBE vaccine by mass spectrometry and found the induction of NS1-specific IgG antibodies in mice vaccinated with the FSME-Immun TBE vaccine. Here, in this follow-up study, we examined the dynamics and extent of the NS1-specific IgG response in mice vaccinated with these two vaccines in more detail and compared it with the IgG response to the whole virus (WV). Mice were vaccinated at two-week intervals with a total of six doses of each vaccine, and levels of IgG antibodies to TBE virus WV and NS1 were measured by ELISA after each dose. Both vaccines elicited a robust anti-WV IgG response after two doses. The Encepur vaccine did not elicit NS1-specific IgG even after all six doses. In contrast, the FSME-Immun vaccine triggered the production of NS1-specific IgG after four doses. The results indicate that FSME-Immun is the only vaccine that elicits an NS1-specific antibody response in mice. However, compared to WV-specific IgG, the NS1-specific response is weaker, and a higher number of doses is required to induce detectable levels of NS1-specific IgG antibodies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flaviviruses: Immunity and Vaccine Development)
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