Novel Vaccine Approaches for Emerging RNA Viruses

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2021) | Viewed by 6142

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Division of Infectious Diseases, Departments of Medicine and Immunology & Microbiology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
Interests: Flaviviruses; Neuroinflammation; attenuated vaccines; RNA viruses

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Emerging RNA viruses continue to pose a unique threat to global human health. Since the turn of the century, we have witnessed new and on-going global pandemics due to influenza viruses, chikungyna virus, West Nile virus, Zika virus, dengue virus, SARS coronaviruses, and many more. With continued population growth and international connections, we need to focus on development of unique and novel vaccine approaches to address this ongoing global health problem. This special issue seeks manuscripts that evaluate new approaches to develop vaccine technology in the field of emerging RNA viruses. These approaches can include basic proof-of-concept approaches for vaccine development, novel adjuvant approaches, immunology of vaccine approaches, and translational efforts to evaluate immunogenicity and efficacy of a vaccine approach for emerging RNA viruses. We are particulary interested in manuscripts that evaluate novel platforms for rapid vaccine development. A continued and persistent effort to develop novel vaccine candidates and approaches for a variety of RNA viruses will provide an important pipeline of data as new RNA viruses emerge and threaten global human health in the future.   

Dr. David Beckham
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • RNA virus
  • vaccines
  • emerging viruses
  • immunogenicity

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

21 pages, 1501 KiB  
Review
Flavivirus NS1 and Its Potential in Vaccine Development
by Kassandra L. Carpio and Alan D. T. Barrett
Vaccines 2021, 9(6), 622; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9060622 - 9 Jun 2021
Cited by 33 | Viewed by 5675
Abstract
The Flavivirus genus contains many important human pathogens, including dengue, Japanese encephalitis (JE), tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), West Nile (WN), yellow fever (YF) and Zika (ZIK) viruses. While there are effective vaccines for a few flavivirus diseases (JE, TBE and YF), the majority do [...] Read more.
The Flavivirus genus contains many important human pathogens, including dengue, Japanese encephalitis (JE), tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), West Nile (WN), yellow fever (YF) and Zika (ZIK) viruses. While there are effective vaccines for a few flavivirus diseases (JE, TBE and YF), the majority do not have vaccines, including WN and ZIK. The flavivirus nonstructural 1 (NS1) protein has an unusual structure–function because it is glycosylated and forms different structures to facilitate different roles intracellularly and extracellularly, including roles in the replication complex, assisting in virus assembly, and complement antagonism. It also plays a role in protective immunity through antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity, and anti-NS1 antibodies elicit passive protection in animal models against a virus challenge. Historically, NS1 has been used as a diagnostic marker for the flavivirus infection due to its complement fixing properties and specificity. Its role in disease pathogenesis, and the strong humoral immune response resulting from infection, makes NS1 an excellent target for inclusion in candidate flavivirus vaccines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Vaccine Approaches for Emerging RNA Viruses)
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