Biological/Targeted Therapy of Immune-Mediated Skin Diseases

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2022) | Viewed by 7586

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Associate Professor, Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy
Interests: psoriasis; psoriatic arthritis; atopic dermatitis; metabolic syndrome; vitamin D; alopecia areata; autoimmune bullous diseases; hidradenitis suppurativa; biologic therapy; urticaria
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Guest Editor
Department of Medicine, Section of Dermatology and Venereology, University of Verona, CAP 37126 Verona, Italy
Interests: psoriasis; atopic dermatitis; vitiligo; alopecia areata; autoimmune bullous diseases; hidradenitis suppurativa; biologic therapy; vasculitis; urticaria; itch

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

You are kindly invited to submit your scientifically valuable contribution to this Special Issue of Vaccines.

Our goal is to collect a series of manuscripts that report biological/targeted therapy of immune-mediated skin diseases “fil rouge”. Inflammatory and immune-mediated diseases are highly prevalent and have great relevance to general medicine and dermatology. Pathways common to different diseases are being elucidated, and many new treatment options are becoming available, thus increasing the need for sharing basic, translational and clinical research findings. We hope to receive scientific contributions that provide new insights, particularly in terms of therapies for inflammatory and immune-mediated diseases such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, hidradenitis suppurativa, autoimmune bullous diseases, urticaria and itch.

Thank you for considering our invitation.

Prof. Dr. Paolo Gisondi
Dr. Francesco Bellinato
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • psoriasis
  • atopic dermatitis
  • vitiligo
  • alopecia areata
  • autoimmune bullous diseases
  • hidradenitis suppurativa
  • biologic therapy
  • vasculitis
  • urticaria
  • itch

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

8 pages, 494 KiB  
Article
Cost per Responder Analysis of Secukinumab versus Adalimumab in the Treatment of Psoriatic Disease
by Paolo Gisondi, Davide Geat, Martina Maurelli, Luca Degli Esposti, Francesco Bellinato and Giampiero Girolomoni
Vaccines 2022, 10(5), 646; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10050646 - 20 Apr 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1881
Abstract
Background: The EXCEED study evaluated the efficacy and safety of secukinumab versus adalimumab in psoriatic arthritis, but it did not include a pharmacoeconomic analysis. The objective of this study was to compare the cost per responder of secukinumab versus adalimumab in patients with [...] Read more.
Background: The EXCEED study evaluated the efficacy and safety of secukinumab versus adalimumab in psoriatic arthritis, but it did not include a pharmacoeconomic analysis. The objective of this study was to compare the cost per responder of secukinumab versus adalimumab in patients with psoriatic disease. Methods: The cost per responder was calculated by multiplying the cost of treatment by the number needed to treat for each therapy. The 52-week primary endpoint was the American College of Rheumatology response rate (ACR) 20; secondary endpoints were ACR 50, Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) 90, and minimal disease activity (MDA). Results: The cost per responder for ACR 20 was €19,846 versus €19,766 for secukinumab and adalimumab, respectively, whereas the costs per responder for ACR 50 and PASI 90 were €27,820 versus €27,384 and €22,102 versus €32,375 for secukinumab and adalimumab, respectively. The cost per MDA responder was €34,072 and €38,906 for secukinumab versus adalimumab. Conclusions: The costs per responder associated with the psoriatic arthritis end points were similar for adalimumab and secukinumab; conversely, the costs for psoriasis and composite end points were lower for secukinumab. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological/Targeted Therapy of Immune-Mediated Skin Diseases)
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8 pages, 2953 KiB  
Communication
Adalimumab in Treating Refractory Livedoid Vasculopathy
by Xiao-Wen Huang, Huan-Xin Zheng, Meng-Lei Wang, Wan-Mei He, Mei-Xin Feng, Kang Zeng and Li Li
Vaccines 2022, 10(4), 549; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10040549 - 1 Apr 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2432
Abstract
Livedoid vasculopathy is a chronic, recurrent skin disorder. It seriously affects the quality of patients’ life. However, the pathogenesis has not been fully identified yet. Here, this retrospective study describes the successful use of anti-TNF-α agent adalimumab in three cases of refractory livedoid [...] Read more.
Livedoid vasculopathy is a chronic, recurrent skin disorder. It seriously affects the quality of patients’ life. However, the pathogenesis has not been fully identified yet. Here, this retrospective study describes the successful use of anti-TNF-α agent adalimumab in three cases of refractory livedoid vasculopathy, which has not been reported previously. In addition, we provide some clinical evidence that adalimumab therapy is efficient in improving skin lesions and relieving the pain of livedoid vasculopathy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological/Targeted Therapy of Immune-Mediated Skin Diseases)
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16 pages, 17810 KiB  
Article
Pitfalls in the Application of Dispase-Based Keratinocyte Dissociation Assay for In Vitro Analysis of Pemphigus Vulgaris
by Morna F. Schmidt, Maria Feoktistova, Diana Panayotova-Dimitrova, Ramona A. Eichkorn and Amir S. Yazdi
Vaccines 2022, 10(2), 208; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10020208 - 28 Jan 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2620
Abstract
Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a chronic, life-altering autoimmune disease due to the production of anti-desmoglein antibodies causing the loss of cell–cell adhesion in keratinocytes (acantholysis) and blister formation in both skin and mucous membranes. The dispase-based keratinocyte dissociation assay (DDA) is the method [...] Read more.
Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a chronic, life-altering autoimmune disease due to the production of anti-desmoglein antibodies causing the loss of cell–cell adhesion in keratinocytes (acantholysis) and blister formation in both skin and mucous membranes. The dispase-based keratinocyte dissociation assay (DDA) is the method of choice to examine the pathogenic effect of antibodies and additional co-stimuli on cell adhesion in vitro. Despite its widespread use, there is a high variability of experimental conditions, leading to inconsistent results. In this paper, we identify and discuss pitfalls in the application of DDA, including generation of a monolayer with optimized density, appropriate culturing conditions to obtain said monolayer, application of mechanical stress in a standardized manner, and performing consistent data processing. Importantly, we describe a detailed protocol for a successful and reliable DDA and the respective ideal conditions for three different types of human keratinocytes: (1) primary keratinocytes, (2) the HaCaT spontaneously immortalized keratinocyte cell line, and (3) the recently characterized HaSKpw spontaneously immortalized keratinocyte cell line. Our study provides detailed protocols which guarantee intra- and inter-experimental comparability of DDA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological/Targeted Therapy of Immune-Mediated Skin Diseases)
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