Special Issue "Future Cities: Concept, Planning, and Practice"

A special issue of Urban Science (ISSN 2413-8851).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 July 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Dora Marinova
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Curtin University Sustainability Policy (CUSP) Institute, Curtin University, Bentley, Perth, WA 6102, Australia
Interests: innovation; sustainability; governance
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Shahed Khan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Built Environment, Curtin University, Bentley, Perth, WA 6102, Australia
Interests: urban planning; urban governance; community transport; future cities; sustainable urban development
Dr. Atiq Zaman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Design and the Built Environment, Curtin University, Bentley, Perth, WA 6102, Australia
Interests: circular economy; waste management; future cities; sustainability assessment; life cycle assessment; climate adaptation; sustainable construction; sustainable development goals; sustainable technology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Mohammad Swapan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Design and the Built Environment, Curtin University, Bentley, Perth, WA 6102, Australia
Interests: green adaptation; informal green space; ecosystem services; TPB Models; place attachment; co-production; participation outcomes; PPP; disaster risk paradigm; informality; SDGs; resilient cities
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cities, the growth centers of commerce, culture, and innovation, are also the largest consumers of natural resources and the chief contributors of environmental pollution. They consume around 75% of the world’s natural resources, generate 70% of all waste, and emit around 70% of greenhouse-gas emissions globally (Ramsar, 2012). Today, cities face numerous unprecedented challenges due to a combination of urbanization and population pressures, increasing socio-economic inequalities, and the adverse impacts of global climate change. In the current development milieu, urban planners and designers struggle to resolve problems related to the built environment arising from increased urban complexity.

With around 70% of humanity projected to be living in urban areas by 2050 (UN 2013), cities in the future would need to provide urban services and amenities to their inhabitants on an even larger scale. The challenge would be further intensified as cities become significantly vulnerable to both natural disasters and man-made crises such as social polarization, political instability and increasing occurrence of terrorism. Future cities will demand greater attention to not only combating effects of natural phenomena, such as climate change, and also the changing socio-economic and safety landscape of the urban reality. At the same time, rapid technological advances in both material and social technology will create new possibilities and opportunities to address many of those problems. There is no doubt that the cities in the future will strive to promote various aspects of sustainability more earnestly than today and there will be more technology at hand to be applied to achieve that end. However, the challenge of attaining livable, resilient, safe and sustainable built environment would continue to be difficult.

The magnitude and severity of the challenges faced by future cities could be largely affected not only by the sustainability measures we take today but also the mindset that we develop towards employing rapid advances in technology and responding to fast moving events in politics and economics. It is imperative that we critically consider how cities are to be governed and how we approach adopting new technologies, as we lay the foundations for future cities that are inherently more resilient in responding to natural and anthropogenic hazards.

The Special Issue “Future Cities: Concept, Planning, and Practice” seeks to stimulate discussion on emerging urban concepts, planning ideas and design practices that promote various aspects of urban sustainability.

Prof. Dora Marinova
Dr. Shahed Khan
Dr. Atiq Zaman
Dr. Mohammad Shahidul Hasan Swapan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Urban Science is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • future cities
  • urban planning
  • urban design
  • sustainability practice
  • urban metabolism
  • urban resilience

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Partnerships for Private Transit Investment—The History and Practice of Private Transit Infrastructure with a Case Study in Perth, Australia
Urban Sci. 2018, 2(3), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2030084 - 03 Sep 2018
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2813
Abstract
Urban transit planning is going through a transition to greater private investment in many parts of the world and is now on the agenda in Australia. After showing examples of private investment in transit globally, the paper focuses on historical case studies of [...] Read more.
Urban transit planning is going through a transition to greater private investment in many parts of the world and is now on the agenda in Australia. After showing examples of private investment in transit globally, the paper focuses on historical case studies of private rail investment in Western Australia. These case studies mirror the historical experience in rapidly growing railway cities in Europe, North America, and Asia (particularly Japan), and also the land grant railways that facilitated settlement in North America. The Western Australian experience is noteworthy for the small but rapidly growing populations of the settlements involved, suggesting that growth, rather than size, is the key to successfully raising funding for railways through land development. The paper shows through the history of transport, with particular reference to Perth, that the practice of private infrastructure provision can provide lessons for how to enable this again. It suggests that new partnerships with private transport investment as set out in the Federal Government City Deal process, should create many more opportunities to improve the future of cities through once again integrating transit, land development, and private finance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future Cities: Concept, Planning, and Practice)
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Article
Prioritization of Local Indicators for the Development of an Age-Friendly City: A Community Perspective
Urban Sci. 2018, 2(3), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2030051 - 21 Jun 2018
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1255
Abstract
Due to the rapid transition of growing ageing populations around the world, there is an urgency to change in attitudes, policies and practices at all levels of governance to fulfil the potential of ageing in the 21st century. The World Health Organization (WHO) [...] Read more.
Due to the rapid transition of growing ageing populations around the world, there is an urgency to change in attitudes, policies and practices at all levels of governance to fulfil the potential of ageing in the 21st century. The World Health Organization (WHO) proposed an age-friendly checklist as a guideline for urban cities. However, the WHO’s age-friendly indicators are generalized and overarching, and need modification by considering local needs. Therefore, localizing age-friendly indicators based on local priority is the first step in implementing a global age-friendly city agenda. This study aims to identify the priority indicators for age-friendly development at local government level in South Australia. The study considers the City of Unley, a local government organization in South Australia, as a case study. The study conducts a community perception survey to identify the important indicators, followed by a focus group consultation to identify the priority indicators based on local settings. The study identifies 25 indicators as priority indicators for the City of Unley that need to be considered for the development of age-friendly Unley. In addition, the study proposes several demonstration project ideas for local government to initiate participatory age-friendly projects for the local community. The findings of the study are important in assisting local government to develop age-friendly strategies by considering their local priority and achieving the global sustainability agenda. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future Cities: Concept, Planning, and Practice)
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Article
Implementing Healthy Planning and Active Living Initiatives: A Virtuous Cycle
Urban Sci. 2018, 2(2), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2020030 - 23 Mar 2018
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1646
Abstract
Factors including internal local government functioning, collaboration and the use of co-benefits have been noted to assist in the uptake of healthy planning policies and projects by local governments. However, less commonly noted is a possible reverse relationship: that implementation of healthy planning [...] Read more.
Factors including internal local government functioning, collaboration and the use of co-benefits have been noted to assist in the uptake of healthy planning policies and projects by local governments. However, less commonly noted is a possible reverse relationship: that implementation of healthy planning projects can contribute positively to organisational functioning and collaboration, and can result in a range of co-benefits that then can be used to support projects. Such a concept is explored in this paper, with a focus at the local government level in Australia. Findings from surveys with local government practitioners and in-depth interviews with healthy planning and community health advocates are presented. The findings indicate four key areas through which the implementation of healthy planning policies and projects and active living initiatives demonstrates a ‘virtuous cycle’. These areas include (1) project ‘wind-up’, or circumstances in which implementation and/or health outcomes exceed initial expectations; (2) improved partnerships that can create opportunities for future initiatives; (3) improved internal organisational functioning; and (4) greater project sustainability. The paper concludes by exploring some possible repercussions of these emerging findings, which indicate that beneficial settings to healthy planning considerations can be a result of as well as a contributor to healthy planning and active living initiative implementation. In turn, this presents another potential co-benefit of project uptake and implementation to those commonly identified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future Cities: Concept, Planning, and Practice)

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Commentary
Exploring the Phenomenon of Zero Waste and Future Cities
Urban Sci. 2018, 2(3), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2030090 - 18 Sep 2018
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3919
Abstract
The evolving phenomenon of zero waste encompasses the theory, practice, and learning of individuals, families, businesses, communities, and government organisations, responding to perceptions of crisis and failure around conventional waste management. The diverse and growing body of international zero waste experience, can be [...] Read more.
The evolving phenomenon of zero waste encompasses the theory, practice, and learning of individuals, families, businesses, communities, and government organisations, responding to perceptions of crisis and failure around conventional waste management. The diverse and growing body of international zero waste experience, can be portrayed as both, an entirely new and alternative waste management paradigm, and or, interpreted as overlapping, extending, and synergetic with a general evolution towards more sustainable waste/resource management practices. Combining the terms zero and waste provokes creative, intellectual, and pragmatic tensions, which provide a contemporary axis for necessary debate and innovation in this sphere of resource management. This commentary draws on an interdisciplinary perspective and utilises some elements of the critique of zero waste, as a lens to examine and better understand this heterogeneous global community of practice. In particular, how the concept and implementation of a zero waste goal can increase community engagement and be a catalyst for the design and management of a more circular urban metabolism and hence, more adaptive, resilient, and sustainable future (zero waste) cities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future Cities: Concept, Planning, and Practice)
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