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Urban Sci. 2018, 2(3), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2030084

Partnerships for Private Transit Investment—The History and Practice of Private Transit Infrastructure with a Case Study in Perth, Australia

Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia
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Received: 25 July 2018 / Revised: 13 August 2018 / Accepted: 28 August 2018 / Published: 3 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future Cities: Concept, Planning, and Practice)
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Abstract

Urban transit planning is going through a transition to greater private investment in many parts of the world and is now on the agenda in Australia. After showing examples of private investment in transit globally, the paper focuses on historical case studies of private rail investment in Western Australia. These case studies mirror the historical experience in rapidly growing railway cities in Europe, North America, and Asia (particularly Japan), and also the land grant railways that facilitated settlement in North America. The Western Australian experience is noteworthy for the small but rapidly growing populations of the settlements involved, suggesting that growth, rather than size, is the key to successfully raising funding for railways through land development. The paper shows through the history of transport, with particular reference to Perth, that the practice of private infrastructure provision can provide lessons for how to enable this again. It suggests that new partnerships with private transport investment as set out in the Federal Government City Deal process, should create many more opportunities to improve the future of cities through once again integrating transit, land development, and private finance. View Full-Text
Keywords: entrepreneur rail model; value capture; city deals; private railways; Western Australia; tramways; streetcars; land grants; future cities; urban planning entrepreneur rail model; value capture; city deals; private railways; Western Australia; tramways; streetcars; land grants; future cities; urban planning
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Davies-Slate, S.; Newman, P. Partnerships for Private Transit Investment—The History and Practice of Private Transit Infrastructure with a Case Study in Perth, Australia. Urban Sci. 2018, 2, 84.

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