Special Issue "Omics Techniques for Toxins Research"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Djuro Josic
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, USA
2. Department of Biotechnology, University of Rijeka, 51000 Rijeka, Croatia
3. Juraj Dobrila University, 52100 Pula, Croatia
Interests: proteomics; the development of high-throughput analytical techniques; plasma-derived and recombinant biologically active proteins from human plasma
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Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest public health challenges of our time. Each year in the U.S., at least 2 million people get an antibiotic-resistant infection, and at least 23,000 people die (https://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/index.html). In Europe, we are facing a similar situation. Sepsis and septic shock are frequent causes of deaths as a consequence of infection with resistant bacteria. Exotoxins of clinically relevant bacteria such as hemolysins can significantly impair organ functions. 

On the other hand, there are more as 250 microbial pathogens known to cause food-borne illnesses. Accidents with food of mostly animal origin, and traditional fermented food products, have recently accompanied numerous cases that have occurred as a consequence of contaminations of fresh and processed food.

Microbial infection may also cause contamination with mycotoxins, bacteria, and other toxins in food, and sometimes in the environment. Omics methods such as proteomics, peptidomics, and metabolomics techniques are newly developed tolls that can help to solve the abovementioned problems. Genome, proteome, lipidome, and metabolome analyses of hosts and pathogens and their metabolites in combination with already established laboratory analyses provide reliable information about pathogen activities during infection, outbreaks of disease, and healing periods. Importantly, functionally relevant proteins and products of metabolism are identified in order to trace abovementioned diseases. Fast diagnosis is an additional critical point and in-vivo genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data can be crucial to guide further functional analysis efficiently. It raises the importance of high-throughput omics analyses and the detection of toxins and other biomarkers of their action during disease progress that will be one of key points in this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Djuro Josic
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • omics
  • genomics
  • proteomics
  • metabolomics
  • bacterial toxins
  • mycotoxins
  • sepsis
  • septic shock
  • food poisoning
  • high-throughput analyses

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Genomic Analysis of Clostridium perfringens BEC/CPILE-Positive, Toxinotype D and E Strains Isolated from Healthy Children
Toxins 2019, 11(9), 543; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins11090543 - 19 Sep 2019
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Abstract
Clostridium perfringens toxinotype D, toxinotype E, and gastroenteritis-linked BEC/CPILE-positive strains have never been reported in healthy children. We isolated, whole-genome sequenced and bioinformatically characterised three C. perfringens isolates—type D (IQ1), type E (IQ2) and BEC/CPILE-positive (IQ3), recovered from the stools of three healthy [...] Read more.
Clostridium perfringens toxinotype D, toxinotype E, and gastroenteritis-linked BEC/CPILE-positive strains have never been reported in healthy children. We isolated, whole-genome sequenced and bioinformatically characterised three C. perfringens isolates—type D (IQ1), type E (IQ2) and BEC/CPILE-positive (IQ3), recovered from the stools of three healthy two-year-olds, which were further compared to 128 C. perfringens genomes available from NCBI. The analysis uncovered a previously under-described putative toxin gene alv (alveolysin) encoded by isolates IQ2 and IQ3, which appeared to be a clade-specific trait associated with strains from domestic animals. A plasmid analysis indicated that the iota-toxin was encoded on a near-intact previously described plasmid pCPPB-1 in type E strain IQ2. The BEC genes becA and becB were carried on a near-identical pCPOS-1 plasmid previously associated with Japanese gastroenteritis outbreaks. Furthermore, a close phylogenetic relatedness was inferred between the French C. perfringens type E isolates cp515.17 and newly sequenced IQ2, suggesting geographical links. This study describes novel C. perfringens isolates from healthy individuals which encode important toxin genes, indicating the potential spread of these veterinary and clinically important strains and mobile genetic elements, and highlights areas for future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Omics Techniques for Toxins Research)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Advanced Proteomics as a Powerful Tool for Studying Toxins of Human Bacterial Pathogens
Toxins 2019, 11(10), 576; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins11100576 - 04 Oct 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1403
Abstract
Exotoxins contribute to the infectious processes of many bacterial pathogens, mainly by causing host tissue damages. The production of exotoxins varies according to the bacterial species. Recent advances in proteomics revealed that pathogenic bacteria are capable of simultaneously producing more than a dozen [...] Read more.
Exotoxins contribute to the infectious processes of many bacterial pathogens, mainly by causing host tissue damages. The production of exotoxins varies according to the bacterial species. Recent advances in proteomics revealed that pathogenic bacteria are capable of simultaneously producing more than a dozen exotoxins. Interestingly, these toxins may be subject to post-transcriptional modifications in response to environmental conditions. In this review, we give an outline of different bacterial exotoxins and their mechanism of action. We also report how proteomics contributed to immense progress in the study of toxinogenic potential of pathogenic bacteria over the last two decades. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Omics Techniques for Toxins Research)
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