Innovative Approaches in Neuronal Imaging and Mental Health

A special issue of Tomography (ISSN 2379-139X). This special issue belongs to the section "Neuroimaging".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 2001

Special Issue Editors

Laboratory of Neuropsychophysiology, Faculty of Psychology and Education Sciences of the University of Porto, Rua Alfredo Allen, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal
Interests: affective neuroscience; emotion; EEG/ERP; MEG; Research Domain Criteria (RDoC)
Coimbra Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Translational Research, Instituto de Ciências Nucleares Aplicadas à Saúde, University of Coimbra, 3004-531 Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: cognitive and Clinical neuroscience; perception, emotion, decision-making, multimodal approaches
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Despite decades of neuroimaging research on mental illness, the neurobiological basis of psychopathology remains elusive and the role of neuroimaging in diagnosis and intervention remains limited. One reason for this lack of progress may concern the conceptualization of mental illness. Indeed, traditional nosological systems for psychopathology establish discrete categories based on symptom clusters that are often biologically and clinically heterogenous. On the other hand, many patients report comorbidity, obtaining more than one psychiatric diagnosis. The presence of within-illness heterogeneity and between-illness similarities raises questions about the validity of diagnostic systems that encompass these apparent inconsistencies. A paradigm shift is likely required in this context.

This Special Issue aims to tackle the issues raised above by inviting papers reporting neuroimaging findings on mental health from the viewpoint of novel conceptualizations of psychopathology (such as the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) (https://www.nimh.nih.gov/research/research-funded-by-nimh/rdoc) or the Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP) (https://hitop.unt.edu/introduction)). This includes, but is not limited to, studies relying on a dimensional operationalization of symptoms, using transdiagnostic samples, and tackling issues of within-diagnosis heterogeneity. Neuroimaging is broadly construed to encompass methods quantifying brain activity and structure (e.g., MRI/fMRI, PET, EEG/ERP, and MEG).

Dr. Fernando Ferreira-Santos
Prof. Dr. Miguel Castelo-Branco
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Tomography is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dimensional
  • transdiagnostic
  • RDoC
  • HiTOP
  • neuroimaging
  • fMRI/MRI
  • EEG/ERP
  • MEG

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 6251 KiB  
Article
Recognition of Facial Emotion Expressions in Patients with Depressive Disorders: A Functional MRI Study
Tomography 2023, 9(2), 529-540; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography9020043 - 27 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1488
Abstract
Background: The present study evaluated the cortical activation during emotional information recognition. Methods: The study group included 16 patients with depression, and 16 healthy subjects were enrolled as a control group. Patients received eight weeks of antidepressant therapy. Functional MRI evaluated the cortical [...] Read more.
Background: The present study evaluated the cortical activation during emotional information recognition. Methods: The study group included 16 patients with depression, and 16 healthy subjects were enrolled as a control group. Patients received eight weeks of antidepressant therapy. Functional MRI evaluated the cortical activation twice in the patient group and once in the control group. The fMRI task processed the emotional information with face demonstration from the PennCNP test battery. Results: During the processing of emotional information, patients showed activation in the middle and the inferior frontal gyri, the fusiform gyrus, and the occipital cortex. After treatment, patients showed a significant decrease in the frontal cortex activation for negative face demonstration and no frontal activation for positive emotion recognition. The left superior temporal gyrus activation zone appeared in patients after treatment and in the control group. Healthy subjects showed more intense frontal cortex activation when processing neutral emotions and less when showing happy and sad faces. Activation zones in the amygdala and the insula and deactivation zones in the posterior cingulate cortex were revealed in the controls. Conclusion: This study confirms the hypothesis that anomalies in the processing of emotional stimuli can be a sign of a depressive disorder. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Approaches in Neuronal Imaging and Mental Health)
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