Fibrous Materials (Textiles) for Functional Applications II

A special issue of Textiles (ISSN 2673-7248).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 12216

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Engineering, Czech University of Life Sciences, 16521 Prague, Czech Republic
Interests: nano materials; textile structural composites; green composites; nanocomposites; biomechanical engineering of fibrous structures; thermo-mechanical characterization of materials; functional textiles
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Chair of Vibro-Acoustics of Vehicles and Machines, Technical University of Munich, 85748 Munich, Germany
Interests: non-woven fabrics; characterization; filtration; acoustic properties; thermal Insulation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Sportmaster Group (SMG) Innovation Centre, Institute for Sports Research, Nanyang Technological University, Cleantech 2, 3 Cleantech Loop 639798, Singapore
Interests: sports textiles; knitted spacer textile
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce a Special Issue titled “Fibrous Materials (Textiles) for Functional Applications” in Textiles, an open-access MDPI journal. Fibrous/textile materials constitute an inseparable component of our day-to-day life. Their importance ranges from baby diapers to life-saving protective textiles in military and space applications. The geometrical flexibility and physical–chemical diversity of functional fibrous materials make them a preferred substitute over metals, ceramics, and other forms of polymers. Fiber-based functional textiles are widely used in technical applications, e.g., acoustic textiles, electronic textiles, fiber-reinforced structural composites, geotechnical textiles, healthcare and medical textiles, nanoenabled textiles, protective textiles, smart clothing, sports textiles, thermos-regulating textiles, and so on.

A recent trend in fibrous material is to focus on biobased materials to reduce carbon emissions, which ultimately hampers our environment. In view of the new challenges faced by humanity, the biological and health-related issues can be tackled to a great extent by suitable innovative materials based on fibrous/textile systems.

The Special Issue is aimed at researchers working on fiber-based functional materials in any concurrent application area. The exposure of young scientists to open access articles in the selected area will provide new insights for future research and innovation.

Prof. Dr. Rajesh Mishra
Dr. Tao Yang
Dr. Veerakumar Arumugam
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Textiles is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • acoustic textiles
  • fiber-reinforced structural composites
  • geotechnical textiles
  • healthcare and medical textiles
  • nanoenabled textiles
  • protective textiles
  • smart clothing
  • sports textiles

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 3634 KiB  
Article
Electromechanical Characterization of Commercial Conductive Yarns for E-Textiles
by Yu Chen, Jacob Hart, Minyoung Suh, Kavita Mathur and Rong Yin
Textiles 2023, 3(3), 294-306; https://doi.org/10.3390/textiles3030020 - 9 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1836
Abstract
With the development of smart and multi-functional textiles, conductive yarns are widely used in textiles. Conductive yarns can be incorporated into fabrics with traditional textile techniques, such as weaving, knitting and sewing. The electromechanical properties of conductive yarns are very different from conventional [...] Read more.
With the development of smart and multi-functional textiles, conductive yarns are widely used in textiles. Conductive yarns can be incorporated into fabrics with traditional textile techniques, such as weaving, knitting and sewing. The electromechanical properties of conductive yarns are very different from conventional yarns, and they also affect the processability during end-product manufacturing processes. However, systematic evaluation of the electromechanical properties of commercial conductive yarns is still elusive. Different conductive materials and production methods for making conductive yarns lead to diverse electromechanical properties. In this work, three types of conductive yarn with different conductive materials and yarn structures were selected for electromechanical characterization. A total of 15 different yarns were analyzed. In addition, the change of resistance with strain was tested to simulate and predict the possible changes in electrical properties of the yarn during weaving, knitting, sewing and other end uses. It was found that Metal-based yarns have good electrical properties but poor mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of Metal-coated yarns are similar to conventional yarns, but their electrical properties are relatively poor. The data shown in this research is instructive for the subsequent processing (weaving, knitting, sewing, etc.) of yarns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fibrous Materials (Textiles) for Functional Applications II)
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19 pages, 9175 KiB  
Article
Nonwoven Fabrics from Agricultural and Industrial Waste for Acoustic and Thermal Insulation Applications
by Aravin Prince Periyasamy
Textiles 2023, 3(2), 182-200; https://doi.org/10.3390/textiles3020013 - 30 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2331
Abstract
Natural fibers are increasingly being used to make nonwoven fabrics, substituting synthetic materials for environmental and economic reasons. In this study, a series of needle-punched nonwoven fabrics were made by extracting fibers from coffee husks and blending them with a proportion of spinning [...] Read more.
Natural fibers are increasingly being used to make nonwoven fabrics, substituting synthetic materials for environmental and economic reasons. In this study, a series of needle-punched nonwoven fabrics were made by extracting fibers from coffee husks and blending them with a proportion of spinning waste consisting of cotton fibers and another five different natural fibers. This work investigates the coefficient of sound absorption, thermal conductivity, areal density, thickness, and air permeability. Overall, the sound absorption properties of the produced nonwoven fabric depend on the blend proportion and the number of layers. The results from the fabric containing nettle and banana fibers demonstrate a much-improved sound absorption coefficient. These results have been compared with those of commercially available nonwoven fabrics that are manufactured from polyester and polyurethane foam. The thermal conductivities of the fabrics made with nettle and coir were the highest and lowest, respectively. This is because of the fiber linear density, but all in all, fibers extracted from coffee husks show significantly promising potential for scaling up to replace existing synthetic fibers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fibrous Materials (Textiles) for Functional Applications II)
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17 pages, 12201 KiB  
Article
PCM-Impregnated Textile-Reinforced Cementitious Composite for Thermal Energy Storage
by Túlio Caetano Guimarães, Otavio da Fonseca Martins Gomes, Olga Maria Oliveira de Araújo, Ricardo Tadeu Lopes, M´hamed Yassin Rajiv da-Gloria, Romildo Dias Toledo Filho, Eddie Koenders, Antonio Caggiano, Christoph Mankel, Mona Nazari Sam, Rodolfo Giacomim Mendes de Andrade and Saulo Rocha Ferreira
Textiles 2023, 3(1), 98-114; https://doi.org/10.3390/textiles3010008 - 9 Feb 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2455
Abstract
The growing global energy demand requires solutions that improve energy efficiency in all sectors. The civil construction sector is responsible for a large part of global energy consumption. In this context, phase change materials (PCMs) can be incorporated into construction materials to improve [...] Read more.
The growing global energy demand requires solutions that improve energy efficiency in all sectors. The civil construction sector is responsible for a large part of global energy consumption. In this context, phase change materials (PCMs) can be incorporated into construction materials to improve the energy efficiency of buildings. The purpose of this study was to incorporate a PCM to jute fabric, applying it in civil construction as a reinforcement for cement matrices. In order to do that, a method of immersing jute fabric in liquid phase change material, and then coating it with a polymer, was proposed. Treated jute fabric was then used to produce a laminated composite with a cementitious matrix. Morphological, mechanical and chemical characterization of jute textiles was performed, as well as an analysis of the composites’ mechanical and thermal behavior. The results verified that jute textiles absorbed 102% PCM in weight, which was successfully contained in the capillary porosity of jute. The PCM was able to delay the composite’s temperature increase by up to 24 °C. It was concluded that this method can be used to incorporate PCM to natural textiles, producing composites with thermal energy storage properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fibrous Materials (Textiles) for Functional Applications II)
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12 pages, 1421 KiB  
Article
Effect of an Antioxidant and a Compatibilizer on the Mechanical Properties of Virgin and Thermally Aged Polypropylene Drawn Fibers
by Costas Tsioptsias, Georgia Gkouzouma, Konstantinos Leontiadis and Ioannis Tsivintzelis
Textiles 2022, 2(3), 499-510; https://doi.org/10.3390/textiles2030028 - 16 Sep 2022
Viewed by 1739
Abstract
Polypropylene (PP), like all polymers, is susceptible to various forms of aging. Drawn fibers exhibit increased mechanical properties; however, the drawing results in non-equilibrium (decreased entropy) structures, due to the orientation of the polymer chains. Consequently, the drawn fibers are susceptible to an [...] Read more.
Polypropylene (PP), like all polymers, is susceptible to various forms of aging. Drawn fibers exhibit increased mechanical properties; however, the drawing results in non-equilibrium (decreased entropy) structures, due to the orientation of the polymer chains. Consequently, the drawn fibers are susceptible to an additional form of physical aging. In this work, the effect of common industrial additives on the mechanical strength of virgin and thermally aged PP fibers was studied. Thermogravimetry and tensile strength tests were used to characterize the drawn fibers, before and after physical thermal aging. PP drawn at 120 °C and at a drawing ratio of 7 exhibited a tensile strength of 549 MPa, while the incorporation of an antioxidant and a compatibilizer lowered the tensile strength down to 449 MPA. This reduction was related to the constraint of chain alignment due to the low molecular weight and poor dispersion of the additives. Depending on the aging temperature, shrinking occurred to different extents in pure PP fibers, accompanied by a 6–7% reduction in tensile strength. The fibers with incorporated additives exhibited higher rate and degree of shrinking. Briefly, the incorporation of such additives in drawn PP resulted in the deterioration of the fibers’ mechanical tensile properties. Since such additives have an indisputable value for non-drawn samples and their usage is necessary for various reasons also in drawn samples, e.g., for their protection from chemical aging/decomposition, additives specific for drawn samples should be developed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fibrous Materials (Textiles) for Functional Applications II)
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13 pages, 4391 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Several Carbon Fiber Architecture on the Drapability Effect
by Yuri Pereira Chuves, Midori Pitanga, Inga Grether, Maria Odila Cioffi and Francisco Monticeli
Textiles 2022, 2(3), 486-498; https://doi.org/10.3390/textiles2030027 - 5 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2941
Abstract
The growth of the aeronautical sector leads to the growth of polymer composites application, creating new demand for components applications in complex dimensions and shapes. Regarding different methods of draping 2D fabric into a 3D format, the concern is to keep the fabric [...] Read more.
The growth of the aeronautical sector leads to the growth of polymer composites application, creating new demand for components applications in complex dimensions and shapes. Regarding different methods of draping 2D fabric into a 3D format, the concern is to keep the fabric properties and characteristics, since fiber orientation is modified after draping. For that purpose, this study aims to evaluate the drapability capacity of 2D dry fibrous fabrics (plain, twill, satin, non-crimp-fabric 0/90, and ±45) into a complex geometry, i.e., spherical indent. The energy required to drape fabric is composed of fabric deformation mechanisms (shear and bending), which were used together with microscopic deformation analysis to determine the appropriate fabric architectures with the highest malleability. Both NCF fabrics presented high energy and roughness on the fabric surface due to the folding effect of stitching. On the other hand, plain and twill weave fabrics required lower energy to drape but demonstrated higher fiber misalignment and deformation. The satin warp/weft relation favored shear and bending mechanisms, presenting better uniformity in load distribution, symmetry on drape capability, lower deformation degree, and lower fiber misalignment. Despite the intermediate load and energy required for drape, ANOVA and optimization methods confirmed that satin fabric showed better malleability behavior for complex geometries applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fibrous Materials (Textiles) for Functional Applications II)
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