Special Issue "Sustainable Mobility: Interdisciplinary Approaches"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Transportation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Henrike Rau Website E-Mail
Department of Geography, LMU Munich, 80333 Munich, Germany
Interests: social-scientific sustainability research; mobility across the life course; research methods
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Joachim Scheiner Website E-Mail
Department of Transport Planning, Faculty of Spatial Planning, Technische Universität Dortmund, 44227 Dortmund, Germany
Interests: mobility and travel behavior; transport and social change; research methods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The concept of sustainable mobility, that is, people moving in ways that are socially just, environmentally responsible, and economically viable, has gained considerable currency in research, policy, and public life. Due to the complexity of sustainability more generally, and sustainable mobility in particular, the limitations of more narrow disciplinary inquiries have become apparent, resulting in calls for greater interdisciplinarity. However, the scope and nature of interdisciplinary mobility research remains the subject of intense debate, especially regarding the level of cross-disciplinary integration and the methodological choices required. Given the dominance to date of quantitative methodologies in transport and mobility studies, the latter issue seems particularly pertinent. The planned Special Issue of Sustainability titled ‘Sustainable Mobility: Interdisciplinary Approaches’ intends to capture current trends in interdisciplinary mobility research, focusing in particular on methodological innovation and recent advances in bringing together researchers from different disciplines. We are particularly interested in contributions that adopt a critical perspective on disciplinary divisions in mobility research and that explicitly address interdisciplinarity and cross-disciplinary integration in relation to one or more of the following topics:

  • Innovative efforts towards interdisciplinarity and deep cross-disciplinary integration beyond multidisciplinarity, especially between social science and technical and natural science disciplines, as well as within these disciplinary fields
  • Multi-method approaches to mobility research that explicitly seek to integrate qualitative and quantitative methods of inquiry
  • Longitudinal and biographical research that considers trends over time, including changes in people’s mobility practices across the life course
  • Behavior change studies that focus explicitly on transport policy initiatives and their effects on mobility

Prof. Dr. Henrike Rau
Prof. Dr. Joachim Scheiner
Guest Editors

Abstracts of 400 words: 20 December 2018

Please email your abstract as Word document to: [email protected]

NB: We kindly ask contributors to use ‘Abstract for Sustainable Mobility special issue’ as subject line in their submission email.

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Interdisciplinarity
  • Cross-disciplinary integration
  • Mobility
  • Mobility biographies
  • Multi-method research

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Emergence of Mobility Inequality in Greater Jakarta, Indonesia: A Socio-Spatial Analysis of Path Dependencies in Transport–Land Use Policies
Sustainability 2019, 11(18), 5115; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11185115 - 18 Sep 2019
Abstract
Despite numerous studies suggesting a path-dependent relationship between transport–land use policies and urban structures, particularly on the emergence of car-oriented development, this connection has rarely been explained with spatial evidence. To address this gap, this paper investigated the historical and spatial urban transformation [...] Read more.
Despite numerous studies suggesting a path-dependent relationship between transport–land use policies and urban structures, particularly on the emergence of car-oriented development, this connection has rarely been explained with spatial evidence. To address this gap, this paper investigated the historical and spatial urban transformation of Greater Jakarta from three different time periods to understand today’s extensive use of and dependence on private vehicles. This study applied a multi-method approach of (1) historical literature review, (2) computational analysis of the street network using space syntax, and (3) visual analysis of video recordings to allow for a comprehensive insight into the socio-spatial aspects of urbanization as a path-dependent course. The findings indicate that Jakarta’s pedestrian network has been diminishing over time against the well-connected vehicular network. Furthermore, the remaining potential for walking cannot be actualized due to walking inconveniences at the street level. This suggests mobility inequality, since access to citywide urban functions is highly dependent on the access to private vehicles. It also provides spatial evidence that previous policies have had a long-term impact on socio-spatial structures. This paper contributes not only scientific reference for transport and mobility studies in the Southeast Asia region, but also a practical reference for urban planners and policy-makers on how to achieve sustainable development goals and to provide equal access for all. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Mobility: Interdisciplinary Approaches)
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Open AccessArticle
On the Road to Sustainable Urban and Transport Development in the Automobile Society? Traced Narratives of Car-Reduced Neighborhoods
Sustainability 2019, 11(16), 4375; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11164375 - 13 Aug 2019
Abstract
Worldwide, academics and practitioners are developing ‘planning-oriented’ approaches to reduce the negative impacts of car traffic for more sustainable urban and transport development. One such example is the design of car-reduced neighborhoods, although these are controversial issues in the hegemonic ‘system’ of automobility. [...] Read more.
Worldwide, academics and practitioners are developing ‘planning-oriented’ approaches to reduce the negative impacts of car traffic for more sustainable urban and transport development. One such example is the design of car-reduced neighborhoods, although these are controversial issues in the hegemonic ‘system’ of automobility. Despite the reduction of emissions and frequent recognition as ‘best practice examples’, ‘planning-critical’ research questions the underlying objectives and narratives of such sustainable developments. Our study contributes to this research perspective by improving the understanding of narratives that emerge along with car-reduced housing developments. For this purpose, we analyze two car-reduced neighborhoods in the City of Darmstadt (Germany) by conducting interviews with different actors involved in the planning and implementation processes. Our investigation reveals that the development of car-reduced neighborhoods (i) is consciously embedded in the context of sustainability, (ii) is characterized by power relations, (iii) follows normative indicators, and (iv) does not always correspond to lived realities. Altogether, the traced narratives of car-reduced neighborhoods are embedded in the overarching debate on sustainability, while at the same time revealing the dependence of society on the automobile. Thus, the hegemonic ‘system’ of automobility—although it is beginning to crack—continues to exist. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Mobility: Interdisciplinary Approaches)
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