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Moving to Private-Car-Restricted and Mobility-Served Neighborhoods: The Unspectacular Workings of a Progressive Mobility Plan

1
Sustainable Development, Environmental Science and Engineering (SEED) Dept., KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Teknikringen 10B, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
2
TUB Trafikutredningsbyrån AB, Bysistorget 8, SE-118 21 Stockholm, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(22), 6208; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11226208
Received: 30 July 2019 / Revised: 28 September 2019 / Accepted: 29 October 2019 / Published: 6 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Mobility: Interdisciplinary Approaches)
Despite ongoing changes in housing construction around parking requirements, few studies have been undertaken on travel practice and vehicle ownership once homes have been built in line with new requirements and occupied. This study focused on the experience and travel practices of residents in two specific cases involving new requirements in Sweden. It was based on interviews and questionnaires with residents before and after they moved into the two new blocks of apartments. A relatively restricted supply of parking was compensated for with subsidized mobility services for the residents, e.g., car and bike (sharing) clubs. The results indicated a decrease in car ownership in both blocks, as well as a decrease in the frequency of car travel in one of them. There were indications that use of public transport had increased. Our analysis illustrates the roles that parking and mobility services played over time in establishing the residents’ travel habits. The process that shaped the new residents’ car ownership and travel patterns was, in part, quite slow and unspectacular compared with the intentions and expectations of the stakeholders involved as regards to how car ownership and travel habits would change. We discuss a spectrum of everyday life conditions, which together with parking requirements and mobility services can stimulate the growth of urban mobility practices other than those based on private car ownership. View Full-Text
Keywords: minimum parking requirement; flexible parking requirement; mobility; sustainable mobility; mobility services; mobility as a service; mobility practices; social practice theory; mobility biographies; inter-disciplinary; multi-method research minimum parking requirement; flexible parking requirement; mobility; sustainable mobility; mobility services; mobility as a service; mobility practices; social practice theory; mobility biographies; inter-disciplinary; multi-method research
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Johansson, F.; Henriksson, G.; Envall, P. Moving to Private-Car-Restricted and Mobility-Served Neighborhoods: The Unspectacular Workings of a Progressive Mobility Plan. Sustainability 2019, 11, 6208.

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