Next Article in Journal
Socio-Problematization of Green Chemistry: Enriching Systems Thinking and Social Sustainability by Education
Next Article in Special Issue
Coworking, a Way to Achieve Sustainable Mobility? Designing an Interdisciplinary Research Project
Previous Article in Journal
Independent Directors and Organizational Performance: New Evidence from A Meta-Analytic Regression Analysis
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Holistic Approach to Urban Mobility Planning with a Modified Focus Group, SWOT, and Fuzzy Analytical Hierarchical Process
Open AccessArticle

Car Use: Intentional, Habitual, or Both? Insights from Anscombe and the Mobility Biography Literature

Institute for Transport Studies, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(24), 7122; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11247122
Received: 25 August 2019 / Revised: 1 December 2019 / Accepted: 10 December 2019 / Published: 12 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Mobility: Interdisciplinary Approaches)
Policy-makers have recognized that changing travel behavior is important. People, however, do not change their behavior so readily, particularly the use of the car. A central concept that has been invoked to account for this has been the concept of habit. However, various studies also present people as having concrete reasons for driving: Their choices are intentional. This interdisciplinary study attempts to reconcile these two understandings of travel behavior by drawing on insights from the philosopher Anscombe and a growing body of travel research termed the mobility biography literature. It applies some of Anscombe’s insights from Intention to the act of driving. With regard to the mobility biography literature, it draws out conceptual implications both from theoretical and empirical aspects: In particular, the characterization of travel decisions as nested in a hierarchy of life decisions and the association of life events with changes in travel decisions. It concludes that a broader conceptualization of human behavior leads to a broader view as to what policy-makers can do. It reminds us that transport is ‘special’, that transport and policy are inextricable, and that the importance of infrastructure provision should not be ignored. View Full-Text
Keywords: intention; habit; interdisciplinary; Anscombe; mobility biography; analytic philosophy; transport; automobile; travel behavior; infrastructure intention; habit; interdisciplinary; Anscombe; mobility biography; analytic philosophy; transport; automobile; travel behavior; infrastructure
MDPI and ACS Style

Daramy-Williams, E.; Anable, J.; Grant-Muller, S. Car Use: Intentional, Habitual, or Both? Insights from Anscombe and the Mobility Biography Literature. Sustainability 2019, 11, 7122. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11247122

AMA Style

Daramy-Williams E, Anable J, Grant-Muller S. Car Use: Intentional, Habitual, or Both? Insights from Anscombe and the Mobility Biography Literature. Sustainability. 2019; 11(24):7122. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11247122

Chicago/Turabian Style

Daramy-Williams, Edmond; Anable, Jillian; Grant-Muller, Susan. 2019. "Car Use: Intentional, Habitual, or Both? Insights from Anscombe and the Mobility Biography Literature" Sustainability 11, no. 24: 7122. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11247122

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop