Special Issue "Restaurant Sustainable Strategic Management (SSM)"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 October 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Mark A. Bonn
Website
Guest Editor
Dedman School of Hospitality & Tourism Management, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-2541, USA
Interests: market segmentation; supply chain management; generational analysis; wine research; tourism destination strategy; resort mangement; organizational behavior
Assist. Prof. Meehee Cho

Guest Editor
College of Hotel and Tourism Management, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Interests: Sustainable strategic management and supply chain management for the foodservice industry
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Restaurants face a great deal of difficulties by having to respond to rapid changes in customer demands and operate in markets surrounded by increasingly high levels of new and existing competition, while exceptionally high failure rates continue to cast doubts on the chances for restaurants to experience success. Restaurants in particular experience more challenges due to potential losses caused by food spoilage, waste, theft, unrecorded sales and over-portioning. In particular, restaurants categorized as a small- to medium-sized business suffer from a lack of competence in developing and implementing strategic management compared with large businesses. This dilemma continues to be addressed in an ongoing effort to develop effective marketing and operational strategies. Accordingly existing relevant literature has addressed various issues on the examination of best practices for preventing and overcoming this situation. Prior research emphasis has been placed on accurately assessing the extent to which strategic management results in better restaurant business performance.

This movement has focused on the importance of developing ‘Sustainable Strategic Management (SSM)’ involving business activities that include analyzing, developing and implementing economically competitive, ecologically sustainable and socially responsible strategic management activities. Most of the existing academic literature has begun to address sustainable strategic management from primarily two points of view including eco-environmental and ecological aspects. Thus, sustainable strategic management concerning developing and implementing more effective strategies should be assessed based on its performance for business continuity from both the competitive marketplace as well as from environmental perspectives. This implies that a more comprehensive approach should be adopted in the literature by encompassing the long-term viability of sustainable strategies for restaurants.

In conclusion, we need to define and elaborate more integrated sub-disciplinary areas within restaurant sustainable strategic management. Additionally, we should address functional, competitive and corporate level strategic management that can possibly contribute to achieving sustainability in terms of economic, eco- and social effectiveness. Therefore, this special issue will focus on addressing these issues with a specific emphasis on incorporating both superior restaurant performance and environmental- and social benefits in the restaurant context. Finally, this special issue will serve as a springboard for scholars who seek to pursue various research scopes in the context of restaurant sustainable strategic management.

This special issue is confined to topics related to restaurant sustainable strategic management. Relevant topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Restaurant sustainable marketing
  • Restaurant sustainability-oriented organizational structures
  • Restaurant sustainable human resource management systems
  • Restaurant sustainability of performance
  • Restaurant sustainable resource management
  • Restaurant sustainability and competitive advantage
  • Restaurant ethical and social responsibility
  • Restaurant eco-environmental practices
  • Restaurant sustainable supply chain management

Prof. Dr. Mark Bonn
Prof. Dr. Meehee Cho
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Untact: Customer’s Acceptance Intention toward Robot Barista in Coffee Shop
Sustainability 2020, 12(20), 8598; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12208598 - 16 Oct 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Restaurants have been using robots to meet the increasing consumer demand for food customization and safety and contactless service operations. This study identified the antecedent factors influencing a customer’s attitude and acceptance intention toward a robot barista. To this end, we conducted a [...] Read more.
Restaurants have been using robots to meet the increasing consumer demand for food customization and safety and contactless service operations. This study identified the antecedent factors influencing a customer’s attitude and acceptance intention toward a robot barista. To this end, we conducted a questionnaire survey from 10 to 24 January 2020, on a sample of 317 Korean consumers who purchased coffee prepared by a robot barista. We based the analysis on the following determinant factors of the extension of the technology acceptance model (ETAM): perceived enjoyment, perceived usefulness, need for interaction, perceived risk, and perceived innovativeness. The results showed that perceived usefulness had the highest impact on acceptance intention, followed by perceived enjoyment and the need for interaction. Perceived usefulness and innovativeness positively influenced acceptance intention. These results confirmed the significance of the determinant factors in inducing customers’ attitude and acceptance intention toward a robot barista. This study extends the research on the application of artificial intelligence and the fourth industrial revolution technologies in the food service industry, and hence contributes toward the preparations for the post-Covid-19 period. It also offers practical implications for sustainable coffee shop management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Restaurant Sustainable Strategic Management (SSM))
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Open AccessArticle
How Can TV Food Programs Be Used as an Effective Restaurant Marketing Tool? An Extension of ELM with Perceived Risk
Sustainability 2020, 12(17), 7131; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12177131 - 01 Sep 2020
Abstract
In today’s modern society, television (TV) food programs exert significant influence in the domestic and international foodservice market. This study applied the elaboration likelihood model (ELM) to examine the information processing and decision-making activities of restaurant customers related to TV food shows that [...] Read more.
In today’s modern society, television (TV) food programs exert significant influence in the domestic and international foodservice market. This study applied the elaboration likelihood model (ELM) to examine the information processing and decision-making activities of restaurant customers related to TV food shows that they watched. The ELM was expanded and tested by including perceived risk as a factor influencing attitude towards a restaurant. A total of 347 responses obtained from Korean residents, who had obtained information delivered by a messenger in a TV program and had subsequently visited that restaurant in the three months prior to the survey were analyzed. Results revealed that the information quality components significantly influenced attitude towards restaurants. For the peripheral route, while the credibility of the messenger had no significant impact, the vividness of expression had a positive impact on attitude towards restaurants. Performance risk was shown to have a negative impact on attitude towards the restaurant. However, time risk, possibly requiring long-distance travel or long waiting times for available tables played a positive role. The long wait times may be perceived well because many people wanting to eat at the restaurants is a positive sign about the experience. Attitude towards a restaurant positively influenced visit intention. Based on the study’s findings, discussion, implications, and limitations for future studies are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Restaurant Sustainable Strategic Management (SSM))
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Open AccessArticle
Serving Robots: Management and Applications for Restaurant Business Sustainability
Sustainability 2020, 12(10), 3998; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12103998 - 13 May 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
This study focuses on the attributes of serving robots, which include “anthropomorphism,” “animacy,” “likeability,” “intelligence,” and “safety,” and their effect on restaurant customers. The study aims to provide a sustainable development model for the restaurant business, which is suffering from a shortage of [...] Read more.
This study focuses on the attributes of serving robots, which include “anthropomorphism,” “animacy,” “likeability,” “intelligence,” and “safety,” and their effect on restaurant customers. The study aims to provide a sustainable development model for the restaurant business, which is suffering from a shortage of manpower. The study identifies the relationships among serving robots’ attributes, perceived benefits, perceived risks, perceived value, satisfaction, and revisit intention of customers. An online survey was conducted with customers, aged eighteen years or older, of restaurants that use serving robots. A total of 294 surveys were used for the final analysis. The results indicate that there are statistically significant relationships between “likeability” and perceived benefits, “intelligence” and perceived benefits, “safety” and perceived benefits, and “safety” and perceived risks. It also confirms that perceived benefits have a positive effect on perceived value, and perceived value has a positive effect on satisfaction and revisit intention. Moreover, satisfaction has a positive effect on revisit intention. Based on these findings, several meaningful theoretical and practical implications that can lead to the sustainability of restaurants are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Restaurant Sustainable Strategic Management (SSM))
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Open AccessCommunication
Identifier of Regional Food Presence (IRFP): A New Perspective to Evaluate Sustainable Menus
Sustainability 2020, 12(10), 3992; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12103992 - 13 May 2020
Cited by 4
Abstract
The menu offered in restaurants must meet different aspects of quality. Cultural elements are related to their acceptance and can contribute to the preservation of habits, sustainable agricultural systems, and the maintenance of biodiversity and sustainability, among other factors. In this context, this [...] Read more.
The menu offered in restaurants must meet different aspects of quality. Cultural elements are related to their acceptance and can contribute to the preservation of habits, sustainable agricultural systems, and the maintenance of biodiversity and sustainability, among other factors. In this context, this research proposes an instrument for classifying menus regarding the presence/absence of regional foods called the identifier of regional foods presence (IRFP) as a new perspective to evaluate sustainable menus. For this, lists of regional preparations and ingredients were prepared for each Brazilian region. Sequentially, we submitted the dishes/ingredients to a developed decision tree for the classification of foods into regional or national foods. The score, based on the presence/absence of regional foods, considered the components of a menu, with zero attributed to a lack of regional ingredients/dishes. For national dishes/ingredients, researchers attributed a minimum score equal to ten. One regional food gave a score of50 to the menu, and with more than one regional food, a daily menu scored 100. The final menu evaluation was based on the mean scores of the menus in each restaurant. Scores between 0–49.9 were considered inadequate; 50–74.9, adequate; and excellent between 75–100. The IRFP was applied to 111 menus with data collected from all the offered dishes. In total, the study evaluated data from 774 recipes from the menus of 37 restaurants located in the five Brazilian regions with a similar operating system. ANOVA was used to verify if there was a statistical difference between the mean score of each Brazilian region (p < 0.05). The average score obtained by the IRFP in menus from Brazilian community restaurants was 80.3 ± 30.9 (excellent), showing a significant difference between the Northeast and Southeast Regions, with a more significant presence of regional foods in the Northeast (87.7 ± 28.7). The use of the IRFP in menus was shown to be easy in its application, contributing to a stimulation of the use of regional items and, consequently, to the direct and indirect benefits generated for the food system and the local population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Restaurant Sustainable Strategic Management (SSM))
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Open AccessArticle
Small Queuing Restaurant Sustainable Revenue Management
Sustainability 2020, 12(8), 3477; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083477 - 24 Apr 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
When competitive small restaurants have queues in peak periods, they lack strategies to cope. However, few studies have examined small restaurants’ revenue management strategies at peak times. This research examines how such small restaurants in South Korea can improve their profitability by adapting [...] Read more.
When competitive small restaurants have queues in peak periods, they lack strategies to cope. However, few studies have examined small restaurants’ revenue management strategies at peak times. This research examines how such small restaurants in South Korea can improve their profitability by adapting their price increases, table mix, and the equilibrium points of the utilization rates, and reports the following findings based on the analysis of two studies. In Study 1, improving profitability by increasing prices should carefully consider the magnitude and timing. In Study 2, when implementing the table mix strategy, seat occupancy and profit also increase, and we further find the equilibrium points of the utilization rates. Under a queuing system, the utilization rate and average waiting time are also identified as having a trade-off relationship. The results provide insights into how managers of small restaurants with queues can develop efficient revenue management strategies to manage peak hours. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Restaurant Sustainable Strategic Management (SSM))
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Open AccessArticle
Sustainable and Religion Food Consumer Segmentation: Focusing on Korean Temple Food Restaurants
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 3035; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12073035 - 10 Apr 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
As demand for temple food has significantly grown, this study’s objective was to conduct a market segmentation analysis of temple food consumer motives in order to develop effective marketing strategies. The study identified six motives specific to Korean temple food consumption representing “health-oriented,” [...] Read more.
As demand for temple food has significantly grown, this study’s objective was to conduct a market segmentation analysis of temple food consumer motives in order to develop effective marketing strategies. The study identified six motives specific to Korean temple food consumption representing “health-oriented,” “ethical vegetarianism,” “meditative mindfulness,” “educational experience,” “taste,” and “environment protection.” Motives were then used to generate four distinct temple food groups named Highly Motivated, Vegetarian, Environment-Oriented and Minimally Motivated. This study provided useful information for the application of Korean temple food marketing strategies for destinations featuring this growing trend in culinary tourism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Restaurant Sustainable Strategic Management (SSM))
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Open AccessArticle
The Importance of Leader Integrity on Family Restaurant Employees’ Engagement and Organizational Citizenship Behaviors: Exploring Sustainability of Employees’ Generational Differences
Sustainability 2020, 12(6), 2504; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12062504 - 23 Mar 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to investigate how foodservice employees’ perceptions of their leader’s integrity affect their work engagement and organizational citizenship behaviors, with the aim of moderating empirical evidence of generational differences. This study was administered to 218 foodservice employees using [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study is to investigate how foodservice employees’ perceptions of their leader’s integrity affect their work engagement and organizational citizenship behaviors, with the aim of moderating empirical evidence of generational differences. This study was administered to 218 foodservice employees using a self-administered questionnaire. The validity and reliability of the measured items were reviewed using a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and they were verified using structural equation modeling (SEM). The study results showed that leader integrity had a significant positive effect on employees’ work engagement, and organizational citizenship behaviors, while employee engagement induced by leader integrity increased organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs). Also, the results found that the effects of leader integrity on OCBs were stronger for Generation Y workers than for Generation X workers. Limitations and future research directions are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Restaurant Sustainable Strategic Management (SSM))
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Open AccessArticle
Examining the Impacts of Mega-Events on Urban Development Using Coupling Analysis: A Case Study of the Boao Forum for Asia
Sustainability 2020, 12(2), 730; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12020730 - 19 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Mega-events, as a strategic approach taken by entrepreneurial governments, have the ability to transform the image of a city. This study explores mega-events and their relationship to urban development by developing a coupling coordination degree model and using the official statistics of Qionghai, [...] Read more.
Mega-events, as a strategic approach taken by entrepreneurial governments, have the ability to transform the image of a city. This study explores mega-events and their relationship to urban development by developing a coupling coordination degree model and using the official statistics of Qionghai, China, from 2010 to 2015. The results of this study show that the dynamic of coordination between mega-events and urban development is a classical S-shaped growth curve. In the coupling system, this study also reveals that relevance index and the economy, as sub-indicators, make significant contributions to mega-events and urban development, respectively. Finally, the researchers concluded that the international large-scale events can significantly promote the urban development in host cities. This study reveals theoretical issues and practical implications for policy makers and event managers to achieve integrated and coordinated development between mega-events and urban development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Restaurant Sustainable Strategic Management (SSM))
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