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Special Issue "Marketing of Sustainable Food and Drink"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Economic, Business and Management Aspects of Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Maurizio Canavari

Department of Agricultural and Food Sciences, Alma Mater Studiorum-University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: consumer behavior; quality food products; marketing and innovation
Guest Editor
Prof. Martin Hingley

Lincoln Business School, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: marketing; retailing; and supply chain

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food and drink consumption is universal and something that concerns everyone. Food and drink consumption is a significant source of resource use and waste, and it represents one of the most prominent and structurally diverse (in terms of size and scale) industries in the world. Therefore, food consumption is an important area in which to intervene to improve sustainability. In developed countries, sustainable food consumption, often identified with organic and locally sourced foods and drinks, and concerns over food and packaging waste, are growing trends; additionally, the food industry is looking to sustainability as a possible differentiator that is able to attract consumers. However, sustainability of food production, distribution, and consumption is gaining relevance in emerging and developing countries as well. Further, the focus for sustainability has evolved from an initial emphasis on products and consumption to wider interconnected sustainability as it affects people, communities, and environments, and new technologies are driving the way that people order, access, and consume food and drink.

Research on consumer preferences for more sustainable food choices is of utmost importance to understand the main motivations and attitudes behind this trend and the resulting implications for value perception. On the supply side, agribusiness, food processing and foodservice, and food retail companies are developing new tools and making new sourcing commitments to convince consumers about their sustainability credentials, and research is needed to analyse the effects of such policies and market devices.

For this Special Issue, we welcome submissions linked to the Marketing of Sustainable Food and Drink, including any stage of the supply network in which sustainable food and drink practices can be implemented and value-enhanced through marketing strategies and actions. We also welcome contributions that consider the sustainability of people and communities in consideration of food and drink production, value adding, distribution, consumption (be it locally or globally), and all that connects people and markets in-between.

The Special Issue is aimed at publishing both empirical and theoretical papers from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds, and especially welcomes interdisciplinary approaches and international perspectives.

Prof. Maurizio Canavari
Prof. Martin Hingley
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access bimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable food and drink
  • marketing

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Consumer Preferences for Superfood Ingredients—the Case of Bread in Germany
Sustainability 2018, 10(12), 4667; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10124667
Received: 19 October 2018 / Revised: 25 November 2018 / Accepted: 4 December 2018 / Published: 7 December 2018
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Abstract
Although there is no legal definition of the word ‘superfood’, in recent years exotic foods and ingredients have become popular in German food retailers. The aim of the study was to determine consumer preferences for superfood ingredients in different types of bread; to
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Although there is no legal definition of the word ‘superfood’, in recent years exotic foods and ingredients have become popular in German food retailers. The aim of the study was to determine consumer preferences for superfood ingredients in different types of bread; to accomplish this, a choice experiment was set up with a representative sample of 503 German consumers. Respondents had to choose between products with varying attributes such as type of bread, superfood ingredient, nutritional information, production method, durability, and price. The results indicate that consumers value bread that serves a functional purpose through superfood ingredients such as linseed or chia. Using latent class segmentation, the respondents were divided into four segments, of which three groups valued bread with superfood ingredients. All in all, the type of bread is the most important factor when choosing a bread. Further market research could take into account different types of superfoods (processed/unprocessed), as well as regional deviations in Germany and the EU member states to analyze differences regarding the market potential of staple foods such as bread that serve a functional purpose through superfood ingredients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marketing of Sustainable Food and Drink)
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Open AccessArticle The Impact of Risk Perceptions of Food Ingredients on the Restaurant Industry: Focused on the Moderating Role of Corporate Social Responsibility
Sustainability 2018, 10(9), 3132; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10093132
Received: 2 August 2018 / Revised: 16 August 2018 / Accepted: 31 August 2018 / Published: 3 September 2018
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Abstract
This study investigated the causal relationships between international tourists’ perceived sustainability of Jeju Island, South Korea and environmentally responsible behavior, revisit intention, and positive word-of-mouth communication. Perceived sustainability was employed as a multidimensional construct comprised of economic, cultural, and environmental aspects. Data were
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This study investigated the causal relationships between international tourists’ perceived sustainability of Jeju Island, South Korea and environmentally responsible behavior, revisit intention, and positive word-of-mouth communication. Perceived sustainability was employed as a multidimensional construct comprised of economic, cultural, and environmental aspects. Data were collected from international tourists that visited Jeju Island. The results indicated that environmentally responsible behavior was influenced positively by cultural sustainability, and negatively by environmental sustainability. Revisit intention and positive word-of-mouth communication were significantly affected by the three dimensions of sustainability. Based on the findings, associated implications were suggested for sustainable destination management of Jeju Island. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marketing of Sustainable Food and Drink)
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Open AccessArticle A Social Norms Intervention Going Wrong: Boomerang Effects from Descriptive Norms Information
Sustainability 2018, 10(8), 2848; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10082848
Received: 13 July 2018 / Revised: 2 August 2018 / Accepted: 6 August 2018 / Published: 10 August 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1088 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A large body of research supports the idea of social norms communication promoting pro-social and pro-environmental behaviour. This paper investigates social norms communication in the field. Signs prompting consumers about sustainable seafood labels and informing them about other consumers’ sustainable choices were displayed
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A large body of research supports the idea of social norms communication promoting pro-social and pro-environmental behaviour. This paper investigates social norms communication in the field. Signs prompting consumers about sustainable seafood labels and informing them about other consumers’ sustainable choices were displayed in supermarkets in Norway and Germany. Seafood sales (sustainably labelled versus unlabelled products) were observed before, during, and after the implementation of the signs. The expected change towards more sustainable choices was generally not found. In Norway, the choice of sustainable seafood increased in the prompt-only condition, but the effect was neutralised when social norms information was added. In Germany, social norm messages lead to a decline in sustainable choices compared to baseline, a boomerang effect. Overall, an increase in the purchase of seafood (both sustainably labelled and unlabelled) was noted during the intervention. A second study was carried out to further explore the finding that consumers were mainly primed with “seafood” as a food group. In a laboratory setting, participants were confronted with stereotypical food pictures, combined with short sentences encouraging different consumption patterns. Subsequently, they were asked to choose food products in a virtual shop. Confirming the findings of Study 1, participants chose more of the groceries belonging to the food group they were primed with. These studies suggest that social norms interventions—recently often perceived as “the Holy Grail” for behaviour change—are not as universally applicable as suggested in the literature. According to this study, even descriptive norm messages can produce boomerang effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marketing of Sustainable Food and Drink)
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Open AccessArticle Tasty or Sustainable? The Effect of Product Sensory Experience on a Sustainable New Food Product: An Application of Discrete Choice Experiments on Chianina Tinned Beef
Sustainability 2018, 10(8), 2795; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10082795
Received: 29 June 2018 / Revised: 20 July 2018 / Accepted: 4 August 2018 / Published: 7 August 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (449 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study aims to contribute to the existing literature by verifying whether the degree of liking of a new food product influences people’s preferences and willingness to pay from a discrete choice experiment when dealing with sustainable food products. To this purpose, we
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This study aims to contribute to the existing literature by verifying whether the degree of liking of a new food product influences people’s preferences and willingness to pay from a discrete choice experiment when dealing with sustainable food products. To this purpose, we considered the case study of the introduction into the Italian market of a new food product: tinned Chianina meat. Among the attributes considered for this new product, two in particular were related to sustainability: organic breeding and the preservation of a traditional rural landscape. Half of the respondents underwent a sensory test before taking part in the hypothetical market (discrete choice experiment), while the remaining were administered the tests in reverse order. Tasting the product before the discrete choice experiment did not produce different willingness to pay (WTP) parameters as estimated by a taste factor interaction. However, separating the respondents into those who liked or disliked the product in the tasting condition revealed differences in willingness to pay results. The preferences are different for more than 50% of the attributes considered, and the magnitude of this difference is quite relevant. The WTP for one well known and certified sustainability related attribute—organic breeding—was not affected by the liking, while, for the other—the preservation of a traditional rural landscape—the effect of liking decreases the WTP. As a consequence, we suggest that tasting and liking studies should be routinely coupled with discrete choice studies when analyzing the introduction of new food products, especially when considering sustainable attributes in the experimental design. In the case of organic products where the expectations about taste are higher, neglecting to consider their sensory perception, along with the other discrete choice experiment attributes, could seriously undermine their long lasting success on the market. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marketing of Sustainable Food and Drink)
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