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Special Issue "Lean Design and Building Information Modelling"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Patricia Tzortzopoulos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Art, Design and Architecture, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield HD1 3DH, UK
Interests: design management; lean design and construction; Building Information Modelling; value generation; requirements management; healthcare design; social housing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For many years, researchers and practitioners aimed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of design and production in construction. This has been the main focus of Lean Design and Construction initiatives and remain as current today as it was more than 25 years ago, at the begining of Lean Construction research.

Lean addresses design as a production process, in which information is transformed, value added to it continually, informed by clients and other stakeholders. Design has been highlighted in lean as the main means to generate value to clients. However, the adoption of lean thinking is still modest in design. The complexity in identifying and managing requirements, the multiple and sometimes competing requirements for efficiency, sustainability and cost, handovers between professionals and organisations, the inherently temporal nature of construction teams and the continuously evolving technological agenda make the undertaking of design increasingly challenging.

Lean design and Building Information Modelling (BIM) are central means of the ongoing transformation in the construction industry. However, the emphasis of BIM research has been mostly in the technology, although the results of the implementation depend at least as much, if not more, upon business environment and social phenomena. The links between Lean and BIM have been discussed for 10 years, and there is a clear need and opportunity to continue to unravel these links, and to consider a social science perspective in this context.

The current transformation around Lean and BIM is a major opportunity for researchers to observe interesting phenomena such as as creativity, problem-solving, collaboration, co-creation, commitment and trust, which may lead to improved methods and models of management. The evolving technological and business landscape provides many interesting puzzles and contradictions for researchers to study.

Therefore, this Special Issue provides a forum to discuss and identify new trends and developments in Lean Design and Building Information Modelling in improving the design process and its outcomes.

We invite researchers to submit original papers that include conceptual, empirical, analytical, or design-oriented approaches: Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Design theory
  • Value generation
  • Target Value delivery
  • Integrated Project Delivery
  • Links between Lean and BIM in design; how they complement each other at detailed activity levels
  • Collaboration, co-creation and early involvement of stakeholders in digitally enabled projects
  • Design management tools and techniques, such as Choosing by Advantages, Set Based Design between others
  • Requirements capture and management
  • Visual Management applications in digital design and production
  • Design creativity
  • Improved levels of automation in design – code checking, standardised products, platforms, mass customisation
  • Other technological developments e.g. robotics, 3D printing, Artificial Intelligence  – and how they affect design

Prof. Patricia Tzortzopoulos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Article
Diffusion of Building Information Modeling in Building Projects and Firms in Singapore
Sustainability 2020, 12(18), 7762; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12187762 - 20 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 753
Abstract
Building information modeling (BIM) implementation has been mandated in building projects in Singapore, but a wider adoption is still desired. This study aims to investigate the factors influencing BIM diffusion and examine how the factors influence firms with different project roles, firm sizes, [...] Read more.
Building information modeling (BIM) implementation has been mandated in building projects in Singapore, but a wider adoption is still desired. This study aims to investigate the factors influencing BIM diffusion and examine how the factors influence firms with different project roles, firm sizes, and BIM implementation experience. The results of a pilot study, a questionnaire survey with 89 professionals, and five post-survey interviews showed that hindrances related to inadequate multi-party collaboration (whether formal or informal), conservative mindset, limited skills, costly infrastructure and training, and multi-discipline model integration were the most influential, whereas drivers associated with project leadership team’s strategic consensus, multi-disciplinary design coordination, training, and government regulations were top-ranked. Subgroup analyses between pairs of firms with different characteristics revealed that while construction firms and less experienced stakeholders tended to underestimate BIM implementation difficulties, small-medium contractors might underestimate relevant benefits. The findings and managerial recommendations help different types of firms prioritize resources to overcome hindrances, seize opportunities (such as gaining a competitive edge from BIM practical experience), and obtain support from workers executing BIM daily. With major stakeholders’ recognition and implementation, BIM can be successfully diffused in building projects and firms. The Singapore government and other countries can refer to this study when further issuing BIM diffusion policies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lean Design and Building Information Modelling)
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Article
Lean Management Framework for Healthcare Facilities Integrating BIM, BEPS and Big Data Analytics
Sustainability 2020, 12(17), 7061; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12177061 - 29 Aug 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1623
Abstract
An increase in the usage of information and communication technologies (ICT) and the Internet of Things (IoT) in Facility Management (FM) induces a huge data stack. Even though these data bring opportunities such as cost savings, time savings, increase in user comfort, space [...] Read more.
An increase in the usage of information and communication technologies (ICT) and the Internet of Things (IoT) in Facility Management (FM) induces a huge data stack. Even though these data bring opportunities such as cost savings, time savings, increase in user comfort, space optimization, energy savings, inventory management, etc., these data sources cannot be managed and manipulated effectively to increase efficiency at the FM stage. In addition to data management issues, FM practices, or developed solutions, need to be supported with the implementation of lean management philosophy to reveal organizational and managerial wastes. In the literature, some researchers performed studies about awareness about building information modeling (BIM)-FM, and FM-related data management problems in terms of lean philosophy. However, the comprehensive solution for effective FM has not been investigated with the application of lean management philosophy yet. Therefore, this study aims to develop an FM framework for healthcare facilities by considering lean management philosophy since more stable workflow, continuous improvement, and creating more value to customers will help to deliver a more acceptable solution for the FM industry. Within this context, the integration of BIM, Building Energy Performance Simulations, and Big Data Analytics are proposed as a solution. In the study, the Design Science Research (DSR) methodology was followed to develop the FM framework. Depending on the DSR methodology, two scenarios were used to investigate the issue in a real healthcare facility and develop the FM framework. The developed framework was evaluated by four experts, and the revisions of the proposed framework were realized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lean Design and Building Information Modelling)
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Article
Modeling Supply Chain Integration in an Integrated Project Delivery System
Sustainability 2020, 12(12), 5092; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12125092 - 23 Jun 2020
Viewed by 809
Abstract
The supply chain relationship is an essential factor in the performance of Integrated Project Delivery (IPD). The IPD system encourages the early involvement of key participants in the design stage. Consequently, this early involvement requires a new configuration of the supply chain relationship [...] Read more.
The supply chain relationship is an essential factor in the performance of Integrated Project Delivery (IPD). The IPD system encourages the early involvement of key participants in the design stage. Consequently, this early involvement requires a new configuration of the supply chain relationship in the IPD system. However, there is a lack of knowledge in understanding the performance of the supply chain relationship in the IPD system. To fill this gap, we applied a simulation model, Virtual Design Team (VDT), to explore the dynamics of the supply chain integration in terms of project organization and project delivery process in design. This study presents a conceptual and qualitative analysis of the VDT model applied in two IPD projects. The results explored different behaviors of integration at inter-organizational and project levels throughout project organization, contractual and technological mechanisms of coordination. The project organization characteristics influence the performance of the construction supply chain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lean Design and Building Information Modelling)
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Article
Value Analysis Model to Support the Building Design Process
Sustainability 2020, 12(10), 4224; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12104224 - 21 May 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 955
Abstract
The architecture, engineering, and construction industry requires methods that link the capture of customer requirements with the continuous measurement of the value generated and the identification of value losses in the design process. A value analysis model (VAM) is proposed to measure the [...] Read more.
The architecture, engineering, and construction industry requires methods that link the capture of customer requirements with the continuous measurement of the value generated and the identification of value losses in the design process. A value analysis model (VAM) is proposed to measure the value creation expected by customers and to identify value losses through indexes. As points of reference, the model takes the Kano model and target costing, which is used in the building project design process. The VAM was developed under the design science research methodology, which focuses on solving practical problems by producing outputs by iteration. The resulting VAM allowed the measurement and analysis of value through desired, potential, and generated value indexes, value loss identification, and percentages of value fulfillment concerning the design stage. The VAM permits the comparison of different projects, visualization of the evolution of value generation, and identification of value losses to be eradicated. The VAM encourages constant feedback and has potential to deliver higher value, as it enables the determination of parameters that add value for different stakeholders and informs designers where to direct resources and efforts to enhance vital variables and not trivial variables. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lean Design and Building Information Modelling)
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Article
Using Building Information Modelling to Manage Client Requirements in Social Housing Projects
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 2804; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072804 - 02 Apr 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1289
Abstract
This paper proposes a set of guidelines for using Building Information Modelling (BIM) to manage client requirements in the context of social housing projects. A process model representing main activities involved in requirements management has been devised, as well as nine constructs that [...] Read more.
This paper proposes a set of guidelines for using Building Information Modelling (BIM) to manage client requirements in the context of social housing projects. A process model representing main activities involved in requirements management has been devised, as well as nine constructs that can be used for assessing the effectiveness of using BIM for client requirements management. The process of managing and modelling clients’ requirements is important to improve value generation, considering the limited resources usually available for social housing projects, as well as the need to deal with the diversity of user profiles. The use of BIM-based tools to support this process can potentially improve the performance of those projects in terms of environmental and social sustainability. Design Science Research was the methodological approach adopted in this investigation. The main outcome of this study, the set of guidelines, emerged from an empirical study carried out in a social housing project from Brazil. This study explores the managerial perspective of client requirements modelling, proposing practical contributions, such as understanding the challenges of managing requirements in social housing projects, and theoretical contributions, such as descriptions of the activities involved in client requirements management and their interactions, and constructs for assessing BIM-based solutions for that problem. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lean Design and Building Information Modelling)
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Article
Tolerance Management in Construction: A Conceptual Framework
Sustainability 2020, 12(3), 1039; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12031039 - 01 Feb 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1231
Abstract
Defects associated with dimensional and geometric tolerance variability (tolerance problems) are often dealt with during the construction phase of projects. Despite the potentially severe consequences of those defects, tolerance management (TM) is a perennial challenge, and the construction industry lacks a systematic and [...] Read more.
Defects associated with dimensional and geometric tolerance variability (tolerance problems) are often dealt with during the construction phase of projects. Despite the potentially severe consequences of those defects, tolerance management (TM) is a perennial challenge, and the construction industry lacks a systematic and practical process to provide insight into avoiding the reoccurrence of tolerance problems. The aim of this research is to present a conceptual framework to proactively reduce the reoccurrence of tolerance problems at stages preceding on site construction. The research uses an exploratory case study approach exploring TM in a civil engineering consultancy. Evidence was collated from semi-structured interviews and document analysis, and validated in a group interview. The data was analysed using thematic analysis. The study contributes to knowledge in engineering management by providing new insights into drawbacks of existing TM guidelines. It also describes a good practice application of TM by a civil engineering consultancy, and proposes a conceptual framework to improve TM, which provides a basis to develop more effective practical solutions for TM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lean Design and Building Information Modelling)
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Article
Improving Building Design Processes and Design Management Practices: A Case Study
Sustainability 2020, 12(3), 911; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12030911 - 26 Jan 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2009
Abstract
The aim of this case study, underpinned by participative action research and design science research methodologies, is to show how design and design management practices can be improved based on a new conception of design activity and lean design management. First, problems related [...] Read more.
The aim of this case study, underpinned by participative action research and design science research methodologies, is to show how design and design management practices can be improved based on a new conception of design activity and lean design management. First, problems related to design and design project management are identified using a triangulation of methods, and a root-cause analysis is conducted. Second, interventions are developed, implemented, and evaluated over two iterations. The methods and practices employed in the organization under study imply it had adopted the transformation view of the conceptualization of design. It was also observed that the organization considered design strictly a technical activity. Both choices appeared to be the root causes of the problems faced by the organization. To complement the transformation view, methods and practices following the flow and value views were introduced. To counteract the strictly “technical understanding of design”, “social” concepts were introduced. As a direct result of theory-driven interventions, there were significant improvements in building design processes and design management practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lean Design and Building Information Modelling)
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