Special Issue "Sustainable Urbanism and Architecture"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Tourism, Culture, and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 April 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Miguel Amado
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Guest Editor
Instituto Superior Técnico, University of Lisboa, Avª Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisbon Portugal
Interests: development of knowledge and methodologies for the sustainability of the built environment; integration of sustainability principles in regional and urban planning; architecture and sustainable construction; housing policies and programs; urban regeneration; rehabilitation of informal areas in developing countries; sustainable urban planning and architecture; renewable energies; energy efficiency in urbanism and architecture
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Francesca Poggi
Website
Co-Guest Editor
Cisc.Nova—Interdisciplinary Center of Social Sciences, FCSH-UNL, Av. de Berna, 26-C, 1069-061 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: sustainable city models; public policies; urban planning; GIS; urban regeneration; sustainable urban design; public spaces; bioclimatic design; urban heat island; green buildings; parametric design—BIM; sustainable construction, eco-building; net-zero energy building; passive house; solar energy in built environment; building-integrated photovoltaics; energy efficiency; building rehabilitation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue addresses the topic of “Sustainable Urbanism and Architecture” as a way to contribute to sustainable development. Sustainability is often understood as a result of a fair balance between the environment and the social and economic dimensions of human activities on the planet.

Interventions in the urban environment are the result of an integrated blend of urbanism and architecture—the design framework for reinventing the development models of societies. Today, these actions have shaped such spaces at different scales of intervention but always from a local perspective.

The opportunity to rethink and reinvent the city revolves around the development of more social and shared spaces in the city, using urbanism and architecture to deal with numerous issues, such as the climate, energy, water, and local materials and their reuse, as well as the improvement of mobility through smart zoning and the promotion of the circular economy in which efforts to reduce, reuse, and recycle are prioritized.

Another theme is the role of sustainability in the built environment, which can be increased through its assessment by using certification systems that allow us to estimate the level of efficiency and sustainability that must be achieved during the pre-design process and after the implementation of a project.

This Special Issue welcomes articles that discuss challenges to and opportunities for the implementation of sustainable urbanism and architecture, in all its aspects. Topics may be theoretical, technical, or focused on specific case studies; offer management or governance approaches; or be project-focused or more holistic approaches. Manuscripts that explore cultural, social, or economic considerations with respect to the built environment are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Miguel Amado
Prof. Dr. Francesca Poggi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sustainability
  • Urbanism
  • Architecture
  • Sustainable design
  • Sustainable construction

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
The Possibilities of Preservation, Regeneration and Presentation of Industrial Heritage: The Case of Old Mint “A.D.” on Belgrade Riverfront
Sustainability 2020, 12(13), 5264; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12135264 - 29 Jun 2020
Abstract
This paper aims to explore industrial heritage of Belgrade that is located in the city center and therefore, has considerable potential for future architectural and urban development of the Serbian capital. The whole Belgrade riverfront area along the Sava and the Danube Rivers [...] Read more.
This paper aims to explore industrial heritage of Belgrade that is located in the city center and therefore, has considerable potential for future architectural and urban development of the Serbian capital. The whole Belgrade riverfront area along the Sava and the Danube Rivers has a large number of abandoned industrial buildings that have significant value and need to be preserved and revitalized. This paper represents a research project conducted by lecturers at the Faculty of Architecture in Belgrade in the course History and Theory 1—Visual Culture in Architectural Theory and Practice. In order to provide productive research, we have employed the case study method based on the old Mint “A.D.”, which we have chosen as a characteristic example of Belgrade’s industrial heritage architecture. An important goal of this research is to provide professional information and raise public awareness about the importance and potential of industrial heritage for the future economic, cultural, social and tourist development of the city. This paper analyzes possibilities to comprehend the problems of the city’s industrial heritage protection regarding its historical and urban context, its genesis, authenticity, identity, cultural, architectural, economic, social, productive, creative and environmental values. According to that, the main goal of this research is concentrated on the sustainable preservation of specific cultural tangible and intangible values, spirit of the place, city identity and historic cityscape values that characterize industrial heritage in the social, cultural, natural and built environmental systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Urbanism and Architecture)
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Open AccessArticle
Taipei and Seoul’s Modern Urbanization under Japanese Colonial Rule: A Comparative Study from the Present-Day Context
Sustainability 2020, 12(11), 4772; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114772 - 11 Jun 2020
Abstract
Both Taipei and Seoul underwent a process of colonization and modern urbanization during the early part of the 20th century, under Japanese rule. In both countries, urban-planning projects from the colonial period have had a great impact on recent urban changes. This comparative [...] Read more.
Both Taipei and Seoul underwent a process of colonization and modern urbanization during the early part of the 20th century, under Japanese rule. In both countries, urban-planning projects from the colonial period have had a great impact on recent urban changes. This comparative analysis aims to identify the characteristics of modern cities with Japanese colonial histories, focusing on the following three aspects: (1) Urban structure based on spatial distribution by ethnic group; (2) Japanese colonial urban planning; and (3) modern boulevards that convey the power and spectacle of a colonial city. Taipei and Seoul have multi-cores because the Japanese and Taiwanese/Korean areas were not clearly separated spatially. Secondly, Japanese colonial urban planning was influenced by Japanese settlements and government facilities. Thirdly, the main boulevards in each city, created through modern urban planning, combine modern streetscapes with imperial spectacle. These boulevards took on an important political meaning after liberation. Comparative studies of Taipei and Seoul can illuminate the difference between modern cities with a Japanese colonial history and colonial cities under European rule. Such comparisons make it possible to analyze the meaning, value, and relevance of colonial remnants, including urban structure and artifacts, for each city’s sustainable future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Urbanism and Architecture)
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Open AccessArticle
Architectural Heritage Value Dispersed on Sensuous Thresholds in Kim Swoo Geun’s Arario Museum in Space, Seoul
Sustainability 2020, 12(11), 4664; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114664 - 08 Jun 2020
Abstract
As a representation of Korea’s modern architecture, Kim Swoo Geun described the Space Group of Korea Building as an “enclosed but endless space”. The Space Group Building is currently Korea’s Registered Cultural Heritage No. 586. Its name was changed to Arario Museum in [...] Read more.
As a representation of Korea’s modern architecture, Kim Swoo Geun described the Space Group of Korea Building as an “enclosed but endless space”. The Space Group Building is currently Korea’s Registered Cultural Heritage No. 586. Its name was changed to Arario Museum in Space; since 2013, it has been used as a museum. This study aims to reveal what spatial features of the Arario Museum have value as cultural heritage to make its sustainable architectural message. This research will analyze spatial traits within thresholds, beyond the general spatial traits of the architecture itself. The threshold gives Arario Museum meaning as a registered cultural property of Korea. The fundamental methodology to analyze the issue of threshold is to document the architectural experience based on the architect’s interviews, sketches and diagrams for design intention and strategy. Kim’s space displays the unification of physical structure and invisible phenomenon and cognition. The definition of threshold and the elements that constitute it discussed in this research were those that cover such multileveled concepts as materials that constitute the threshold. In addition, the phenomenon and status of these elements extracted in such manner being actually dispersed was verified, and the obtained characteristics of the threshold can result in the following: the concealment, juxtaposition, and flexibility are ultimately expanded to the ambiguity which is unique to Arario Museum in Space. Concealment started from observing the surface of threshold itself, and juxtaposition is the relational interpretation among the various elements. After the analysis on the dispersion and contacts, the status and phenomena of the building’s thresholds were concluded as a flexibility connection to its heritage value. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Urbanism and Architecture)
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Open AccessArticle
Incorporating Form-Based Codes into the Design-Based Approach to Historic Building Conservation in Phuket, Thailand
Sustainability 2020, 12(9), 3859; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093859 - 09 May 2020
Abstract
In Thailand, the concept and measurement of urban planning rely on conventional zoning, which includes land use, building usage, and open space ratio. Conventional zoning focuses on both the growth of buildings in terms of physical dimensions and their usability in lowland areas. [...] Read more.
In Thailand, the concept and measurement of urban planning rely on conventional zoning, which includes land use, building usage, and open space ratio. Conventional zoning focuses on both the growth of buildings in terms of physical dimensions and their usability in lowland areas. The guidelines and measures used in urban planning do not reflect the spatial relationship of the community, as they have a less detailed design and place no emphasis on the identity of the district. Urban planning might not protect the sense of any given place, as it often uses a one-size-fits-all plan that is then applied to whole communities. Form-Based Codes (FBCs) are urban planning tools that are used to maximize land use, benefit the public, focus on creating a specific physical form, and design the development and public spaces in a way that matches the community’s vision. FBCs are the result of the cooperation between stakeholders, architects, urban planners, government agencies, and members of the local community who are willing to create a plan for their public space and to preserve the physical characteristics of the city. In this paper, we aimed to understand the relationship between various historical contexts and the FBCs using the case study of Phuket’s old town, which has a fusion of Sino–Portuguese architecture. Building form standards suitable for Phuket’s old town were created by comparing them to a baseline case that uses existing codes and regulations and using the FBCs’ components. FBCs have the potential to enhance the character and vibrancy of the historic area by improving façade design and preserving the sense of place and community pride. The results support the hypothesis that FBCs are able to supplement conventional zoning in historic districts. Recommendations for a local historic preservation commission and communities that are considering the adoption of FBCs for historic resources and districts are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Urbanism and Architecture)
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Open AccessArticle
Assessing Neighborhood Satisfaction and Social Capital in a Multi-Cultural Setting of an Abu Dhabi Neighborhood
Sustainability 2020, 12(8), 3200; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083200 - 15 Apr 2020
Abstract
Behavioral research studies propose that urban open spaces contribute to enhance sociability in urban areas. The urban areas in the city of Abu Dhabi are less appealing to attract vibrant activity and social life. This study investigates the role of the built environment [...] Read more.
Behavioral research studies propose that urban open spaces contribute to enhance sociability in urban areas. The urban areas in the city of Abu Dhabi are less appealing to attract vibrant activity and social life. This study investigates the role of the built environment in the enhancement of neighborhood satisfaction and social capital in a residential neighborhood of Abu Dhabi. A total of 145 residents were surveyed for their perception, attitude, and behavior. Regression analyses to predict the role of the built environment of the open space, as well as the ethnicity of respondents, on measures of neighborhood satisfaction and social capital were performed. Spatial data and audit tools were used to assess the lack of suitable built-environment in the study area. Results indicate that improvements to the built environment can improve both the social capital and neighborhood satisfaction of the urban residents of Abu Dhabi. Implications of this study include recommendations to enhance the experience of urban spaces in arid regions like Abu Dhabi. Recommendations include adding landscape elements, providing a comfortable walking environment, adding attractive locations and destinations, and a clean and safe environment with attractive buildings or homes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Urbanism and Architecture)
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Open AccessArticle
Cultural Sustainability and Vitality of Chinese Vernacular Architecture: A Pedigree for the Spatial Art of Traditional Villages in Jiangnan Region
Sustainability 2019, 11(24), 6898; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11246898 - 04 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Presently, the rapid urbanization in contemporary cities in China has resulted in more buildings of low cultural value and high energy consumption. Many traditional Chinese villages exhibit special spaces that have been optimally adapted to the climatic and environmental features of the area [...] Read more.
Presently, the rapid urbanization in contemporary cities in China has resulted in more buildings of low cultural value and high energy consumption. Many traditional Chinese villages exhibit special spaces that have been optimally adapted to the climatic and environmental features of the area using vernacular methods. The buildings in these villages can maintain the environment more sufficiently for the intended programs and consuming a lower level of resources. The construction technics and the artistic features in these spaces are invaluable and inspiring for contemporary architectural practices. This study aims to establish a pedigree of the artistic features exhibited in traditional Chinese villages to support sustainable development. This is to be achieved through thoroughly exploring the spatial design of these villages archived in a big-data resource. The pedigree integrates the dynamics (cultural changes over a certain period of time) and static (spatial features at a fixed time) of how the spaces in these villages have evolved. It is concluded that both a high level of sustainability and exceptional artistic quality have been achieved over a long history in many of these villages where traditional construction methods and design principals were employed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Urbanism and Architecture)
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Open AccessArticle
The Evolutionary Use of Curved Wood in Korean Traditional Architecture
Sustainability 2019, 11(23), 6557; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236557 - 20 Nov 2019
Abstract
Various types of curved wooden have always been used in traditional Korean architecture. One component is a curvaceous column with varying thicknesses, and the others are curved beams or girders that are needed to support the roof and present diverse curvature. By examining [...] Read more.
Various types of curved wooden have always been used in traditional Korean architecture. One component is a curvaceous column with varying thicknesses, and the others are curved beams or girders that are needed to support the roof and present diverse curvature. By examining the historical alteration of the parts and shapes of these curved members, it is possible to identify the sustainable aspects of Korean traditional architecture and infer the influence of the historical background on forming the sustainability of the architecture. To be specific, while the Goryeo Dynasty (10–14 C) showed an aesthetic summit of temple architecture in terms of extravagant curved wooden members precisely calculated and designed under the influence of Buddhism and aristocracy, the early Joseon Dynasty (15–16 C) presented restrained curve forms of wooden members with fewer materials and a faster process due to Neo-Confucianism, which emphasized austerity. After tremendous social crisis and two wars, the mid-Joseon Dynasty (17–18 C) showed creative indigenous houses with naturally curved timbers, minimizing the manufacturing process and maximizing the pragmatic functionality of the space under the influence of the wars and Silhak (the Realist School of Confucianism). In addition, the late Joseon Dynasty (19–20 C) presented office buildings with strengthened dynamic shapes of the naturally curved timbers as symbolic expression, which is an expanded concept beyond the functionality. In Korean traditional architecture, curved wood members have been used without interruption—although in varying degrees depending on social and economic situations—and have continued to be one of the characteristics of Korean architecture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Urbanism and Architecture)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
BIM-LCA Integration for the Environmental Impact Assessment of the Urbanization Process
Sustainability 2020, 12(10), 4196; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12104196 - 20 May 2020
Abstract
The construction sector is one of the most polluting industries, generating between 30% and 40% of the worldwide environmental burden in terms of raw materials, direct and indirect energy consumption, waste, and CO2 emissions. Recent advances in computer science and data management [...] Read more.
The construction sector is one of the most polluting industries, generating between 30% and 40% of the worldwide environmental burden in terms of raw materials, direct and indirect energy consumption, waste, and CO2 emissions. Recent advances in computer science and data management have facilitated the evaluation of present and future impacts, thus improving the sustainability of architectural designs. Powerful software tools, such as Building Information Modelling (BIM), allow environmental indicators to be incorporated into the construction elements that make up the project to evaluate it during the design stage. In this work, the state of the art of ecological indicator application through BIM platforms is studied. Barriers and uncertainties are also identified. Subsequently, a model is proposed to evaluate the environmental impact of an urbanization process or a project through several ecological indicators (carbon footprint, water footprint, and embodied energy). To perform this analysis, the most important aspect is to determine the quantities of each construction element and their clear decomposition into subelements, since both aspects add certainty to the analysis. For this purpose, construction cost databases are a good instrument for introducing environmental awareness. The reliability of LCA data, which can be obtained from generic databases or ecolabels such as environmental product declarations, becomes crucial. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Urbanism and Architecture)
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