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Sustainable and Safe Two-Wheel Mobility

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2021) | Viewed by 10531

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Engineering, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC 3086, Australia
Interests: intelligent transport systems; road safety; transport modelling; travel behaviour
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
School of Business IT & Logistics, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3053, Australia
Interests: sustainable transport; transport economics; transport policy; road safety
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, University of Thessaly, 38334 Volos, Greece
Interests: transport safety; statistical and econometric methods; machine learning; deep learning; traffic engineering; sustainable urban mobility
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The fleets of powered and non-powered two-wheelers are growing in many parts of the developed and developing worlds. Cycling has been widely accepted and promoted as a sustainable mode of transport due to its substantial environmental, health, and economic benefits. E-bikes, which address the limitations about the speed and range of cycling, have the potential to be an important component of sustainable multimodal transport systems. These potentials can be enhanced with the sharing economy, such as shared bike, shared e-bike, and shared e-scooter systems. E-motorcycles have also emerged as a more sustainable means of travel compared to gas-powered motorcycles, particularly in many developing countries where powered two-wheelers represent a major component of the traffic. Thus, policies for encouraging usage of sustainable two-wheelers, discouraging usage of less sustainable two-wheelers such as gas-powered motorcycles, and improving the safety of vulnerable riders of two-wheelers are essential towards making multimodal transport systems more sustainable. To this end, policies and business models for improving the adoption of e-motorcycles and systems for shared bikes, e-bikes, and e-scooters are also of importance. This Special Issue is focused on recent advancements that aim to improve safety, efficiency, and sustainability of two-wheel transport and mobility. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Electric two-wheelers
  • Shared mobility with a focus on two-wheelers
  • Ride hailing with a focus on two-wheelers
  • Environmental and health effects of two-wheelers
  • Behaviour and safety of two-wheel users
  • Policies to promote sustainable two-wheel transport and mobility
  • Travel behaviour with a focus on two-wheel users
  • Interactions between connected and automated vehicles (CAV) and two wheelers
  • Motorcycle simulator studies
  • Two-wheel traffic flow modelling and analysis
  • Priority measures for two-wheelers

Dr. Long T. Truong
Dr. Richard Tay
Dr. Athanasios Theofilatos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Shared mobility
  • Electrification
  • Two-wheelers
  • Motorcycles
  • Transport policy
  • Travel behaviour
  • Data analytics
  • Road safety

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 819 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Prospective Users’ Choice Decision toward Electric Two-Wheelers Using a Stated Preference Survey: An Indian Perspective
by Mallikarjun Patil, Bandhan Bandhu Majumdar, Prasanta Kumar Sahu and Long T. Truong
Sustainability 2021, 13(6), 3035; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063035 - 10 Mar 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3274
Abstract
Electric two-wheelers (E2W) can help de-carbonize transport in Indian cities. To promote E2W as an attractive alternative compared to the conventional two-wheelers, an investigation on prospective users’ choice decisions is necessary. This paper proposed a comprehensive methodology to evaluate the prospective users’ choice [...] Read more.
Electric two-wheelers (E2W) can help de-carbonize transport in Indian cities. To promote E2W as an attractive alternative compared to the conventional two-wheelers, an investigation on prospective users’ choice decisions is necessary. This paper proposed a comprehensive methodology to evaluate the prospective users’ choice decision toward electric two-wheelers and related attributes in the Indian context. In this paper, attributes such as Operating Cost (OC) savings, top speed, range, charging duration, acceleration, and purchase cost were considered to design a Stated Preference (SP) survey to collect data from prospective E2W users in Hyderabad, India. Concurrently, multinomial logit (MNL) and random parameter logit (RPL) models are developed, and the willingness-to-pay (WTP) associated with each of the identified attributes was estimated. Additionally, the effect of socio-economic characteristics on prospective users’ choice decision was also assessed. Subsequently, a sensitivity analysis was carried out to estimate the relative influence of the attributes on an individual’s choice decision in terms of the shift in probability to choose alternatives with better attribute levels than the base alternative. The results revealed that top speed was perceived as the most important attribute influencing an individual’s choice decision, followed by acceleration and charging duration. Age, income, and journey time significantly influenced an individual’s perception toward E2W and related attributes in the Indian context. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable and Safe Two-Wheel Mobility)
14 pages, 316 KiB  
Article
“Not as Safe as I Believed”: Differences in Perceived and Self-Reported Cycling Behavior between Riders and Non-Riders
by Sergio A. Useche, Javier Gene-Morales, Felix W. Siebert, Francisco Alonso and Luis Montoro
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 1614; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13041614 - 3 Feb 2021
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2163
Abstract
Cycling behavior remains a key issue for explaining several traffic causalities occurring every day. However, recent studies have shown how the assessment of the own safety-related behaviors on the road may substantially differ from how third parties assess them. Thus, the aim of [...] Read more.
Cycling behavior remains a key issue for explaining several traffic causalities occurring every day. However, recent studies have shown how the assessment of the own safety-related behaviors on the road may substantially differ from how third parties assess them. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the differences between cyclists’ self-reported behavior and the proxy-reported behavior that other (non-cyclist) road users perceive from bike riders. For this purpose, this study used data from two samples: (i) 1064 cyclists (M = 32.83 years) answering the Cycling Behavior Questionnaire—CBQ, and (ii) 1070 non-cyclists (M = 30.83 years) answering an adapted version of the CBQ for external raters—ECBQ. The results show how the self-reported and proxy-reported behaviors of cyclists greatly differ in terms of all behavioral factors composing the CBQ model, i.e., traffic violations, riding errors, and positive behaviors. Also, external raters (non-cyclists) are those targeting significantly riskier behaviors than those self-reported by cyclists. These discrepancies between perceived behaviors may give rise to conflicting viewpoints on the interaction between bicycle riders and other road users. Therefore, this study underscores the importance of behavioral awareness, providing highlights for future studies on the behavioral interaction between cyclists and other road users. Results can be used to improve the road safety of all road users by giving indications on self-and proxy-perceived safety-related behaviors and visibility of protective riding habits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable and Safe Two-Wheel Mobility)
16 pages, 854 KiB  
Article
A Comparison of Motorcycle Helmet Wearing Intention and Behavior between Urban and Rural Areas
by Sajjakaj Jomnonkwao, Duangdao Watthanaklang, Onanong Sangphong, Thanapong Champahom, Napat Laddawan, Savalee Uttra and Vatanavongs Ratanavaraha
Sustainability 2020, 12(20), 8395; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12208395 - 12 Oct 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3862
Abstract
The motorcycle is one of the important modes of transport for Thai people in all provinces due to its convenience and ability to access all areas and cover short distances, which is especially convenient for rural people. However, according to the accident record, [...] Read more.
The motorcycle is one of the important modes of transport for Thai people in all provinces due to its convenience and ability to access all areas and cover short distances, which is especially convenient for rural people. However, according to the accident record, it was found that the motorcycle was the vehicle causing the highest amount of accidents, and helmet wearing could save lives and reduce the level of severe injuries. In this regard, the objective of this study was to study and develop a model of factors that affected helmet use behavior using structural equation modeling (SEM) based on the Health Belief Model (HBM). Further, this study compared urban and rural models, so as to suggest suitable guidelines for the promotion of helmet use in the study areas. The sample comprised 801 motorcycle users divided into 401 urban residents and 400 rural residents. From the parameter invariance testing in the two areas, a chi-square difference test found differences in the factor loading, intercepts, and structural paths between urban and rural societies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable and Safe Two-Wheel Mobility)
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