Special Issue "Sustainable Cultural Management"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Tourism, Culture, and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2019).

Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Łukasz Wróblewski
Website
Guest Editor
Research Institute on Territorial and Inter-Organizational Cooperation, WSB University, Cieszyn, Poland
Interests: theoretical and practical issues relating to marketing and strategic management; cultural management; cross-border cooperation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Ana Gaio
Website
Guest Editor
School of Arts and Social Sciences, Department of Sociology, City, University of London, London, United Kingdom
Interests: cultural sector; creative industries; cultural policy; arts management; management of creative/cultural organizations
Prof. Ellen Rosewall
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Arts Management, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, Green Bay, WI, USA
Interests: arts management, nonprofit management, arts administration, creativity and innovation, arts and humanities

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Any business entity that wishes to maintain and strengthen its position in the market must adapt to changing market conditions and the requirements and needs of its customers. This applies to all sectors of the economy, including business entities in the cultural sector, such as cultural institutions. For over twenty years, we have been able to observe dynamic developments in this sector, which have thus brought about a change in its business structure. This change is mainly reflected in the increase in the number of private institutions and companies in culture-related industries, which in turn has led to ever more pronounced competition in the sector. Therefore, the institutions of culture have to face an extremely difficult situation. However, such difficult situation may be also perceived as a challenge for searching new solutions commensurate to the 21st century. 

The concept of sustainability offers new framework for redesigning cultural policies and revisiting cultural management methods through a comprehensive approach that encompasses care for the environment, develops practices for sound management of public resources and brings the concept of social responsibility to the forefront.

This concept requires an innovative approach not only to the cultural offer and the provision of services in the field of culture, but also to the formation of long-term relations with interested parties and investments in local communities. Cultural organizations that introduce innovations in line with the sustainable management concept must constantly improve their management systems, processes and tools, whilst skilfully managing their relations with various interest groups. This consequently leads to the provision of value which combines both the economic and social aspects.

Given this, this Special Issue on “Sustainable Cultural Management” fulfils a considerable gap in the literature. It encourages a diverse set of submissions and we will welcome papers that, inter alia, refer to (but are not limited to), themes such as:

  • Market orientation in the institutions of culture – enhancement or threat to creativity?
  • Culture as public asset
  • Socially responsible innovations of cultural organizations
  • Sense and opportunities of culture commercialisation
  • Methods and techniques of research in the institutions of culture
  • Purchasers’ behaviour on the market of cultural goods and services
  • Obstacles in satisfying cultural needs
  • Culture recipient as a participant of market processes
  • Strategic planning in the institutions of culture
  • Marketing strategies in the institutions of culture
  • Methods of managing the institutions of culture
  • PR in the institutions of culture
  • Role of the institutions of culture in creating the image of the region
  • Management of public space versus cultural activity
  • Management of projects in the sphere of culture
  • Patronage and sponsorship in culture
  • Entrepreneurship in the institutions of culture
  • Impact of globalization on the institutions of culture
  • Cross-border operations of the institutions of culture

Dr. Łukasz Wróblewski
Dr. Ana Gaio
Prof. Ellen Rosewall
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cultural management
  • arts marketing
  • cultural policy
  • institutions of culture

Published Papers (16 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Sustainable Cultural Management in the 21st Century
Sustainability 2019, 11(17), 4665; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11174665 - 27 Aug 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
The connections between culture and sustainability have been in the public agenda since the 20th century [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Cultural Management) Printed Edition available

Research

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Open AccessArticle
The Sustainable Development of Social Media Contents: An Analysis of Concrete and Abstract Information on Cultural and Creative Institutions with “Artist” and “Ordinary People” Positioning
Sustainability 2019, 11(15), 4131; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11154131 - 31 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The sustainability of social media is a common subject of study. With the emergence of cultural and creative industries, many studies have begun to explore the advantages and disadvantages of the integration of social media with cultural and creative industries. However, there remains [...] Read more.
The sustainability of social media is a common subject of study. With the emergence of cultural and creative industries, many studies have begun to explore the advantages and disadvantages of the integration of social media with cultural and creative industries. However, there remains a lack of research on the sustainability of cultural and creative social media. Therefore, the present study uses the example of a non-profit cultural and creative organization as its case. The use of social media content discovery technology explains the sustainable use of cultural and creative social media and how participation and interaction with cultural and creative brands are promoted from the perspective of artists or ordinary people. In addition, the analysis of concrete and abstract information explores how content orientation and brand perception impact emotions and behavior. We use social media content discovery technology to analyze 9529 image posts. The results show that for abstract themes, for example, art or design, people can be more easily guided by information with the help of images, which stimulate positive emotions, resulting in more actual engagement behavior, including posting and sharing. With respect to emotional responses, images with smiles are found to have a significant effect in guiding positive emotions, which are expressed through actions, such as active participation and feedback. By examining the meaning of the information in the images, we find that images with abstract themes have a good connection with the brand image. Although the information is less easily shown, it can guide significant outcomes that are positively correlated with the information. Therefore, strengthening brand image and content themes can effectively consolidate trust in brand content and the sustainable development of cultural and creative social media. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Role of Marketing in Cultural Institutions in the Context of Assumptions of Sustainable Development Concept—A Polish Case Study
Sustainability 2019, 11(11), 3188; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11113188 - 07 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Development of both the marketing and cultural sectors have multi-directional natures, showing relationships with sustainable development that should be considered at various levels of cultural sector management in cultural institutions, at the level of the cultural policy of the state or region, and [...] Read more.
Development of both the marketing and cultural sectors have multi-directional natures, showing relationships with sustainable development that should be considered at various levels of cultural sector management in cultural institutions, at the level of the cultural policy of the state or region, and on the micro-scale. Not only do the natural environment, economy, and technology constitute areas of sustainable development, but also society and culture. The assumptions about sustainable development by cultural institutions are related to implementing marketing concepts in this sphere, in that they are the expression of market orientation (on consumer of culture). The goal of this study was to show that marketing by cultural institutions, as a reflection of their market orientation, translates into these institutions’ implementation of the assumptions of sustainable development. This paper is based on literature studies and the results of empirical and quantitative research that was conducted on a sample of 451 people managing cultural institutions in Poland. The research included general managers, managers, artistic directors, managers of marketing, promotion and sales departments, as well as owners of cultural institutions. Analysis of research results shows that consumers of culture are ranked first as recipients of targeted actions conducted by cultural institutions. An increase in the diversity of cultural offers, including the concept of sustainable development, emerged as a factor stimulating the development of the culture market, being closely related to growth of the quality of cultural offer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Cultural Management) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle
The Benefit of Failure: On the Development of Ostrava’s Culture
Sustainability 2019, 11(9), 2592; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11092592 - 06 May 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Peculiar cultures are symptomatic for areas of traditional industry. The purpose of this paper is to analyze and evaluate cultural and creative industries in Ostrava, the third largest town of the country that at the same time constitutes a typical representative of old [...] Read more.
Peculiar cultures are symptomatic for areas of traditional industry. The purpose of this paper is to analyze and evaluate cultural and creative industries in Ostrava, the third largest town of the country that at the same time constitutes a typical representative of old industrial urban fabrics in the Czech Republic. Special attention will be devoted to the emerging cultural clusters that appear to be indispensable in terms of sustainable cultural management. Unique qualities of Ostrava’s culture culminated in 2009, when the town decided to stand for the prestigious title of the European Capital of Culture. Finally, Ostrava did not succeed, nonetheless the contest vivified the discourse on Ostrava’s culture and a distinctive potential for the creation of cultural clusters was revealed. Semi-structured interviews accomplished with relevant actors of the town’s culture facilitated contextual interpretation of the role of cultural and creative industries as well as mapping the potential cultural clusters in the town. The research question posed in this article is as follows: do development effects formed by the concentration of creative and cultural industries in Ostrava exist? It turned out that the paths towards cultural management sustainability can differ substantially from recipes, which are well-proven in leading developed territories. The results of our analysis confirmed some developmental effects evoked by the concentration of cultural industries and cultural clusters in Ostrava can be identified, but genuine qualitative transformation towards a more cultural and sustainable milieu in Ostrava undoubtedly requires more time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Cultural Management) Printed Edition available
Open AccessArticle
Research on Tibetan Folk’s Contemporary Tibetan Cultural Adaptive Differences and Its Influencing Factors—Taking ShigatseCity, Tibet, China as an Example
Sustainability 2019, 11(7), 1956; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11071956 - 02 Apr 2019
Abstract
Using qualitative research methods and mathematical statistical analysis, taking Shigatse city in Tibet as a case study area, and based on the affective, behavioral, and cognitive (ABC) model and cultural distance theory, we explore the Tibetan people’s cultural adaptive types, differences, and its [...] Read more.
Using qualitative research methods and mathematical statistical analysis, taking Shigatse city in Tibet as a case study area, and based on the affective, behavioral, and cognitive (ABC) model and cultural distance theory, we explore the Tibetan people’s cultural adaptive types, differences, and its influencing factors. The results show that there are seven Tibetans’ cultural adaptive kinds: Integration, assimilation, isolation, marginalization, tending to Tibetan modern culture, adaptation to Tibetan traditional culture, and unclassified cultural adaptive style. The Tibetans’ cultural adaptive tendency mainly integrates between modern and traditional parts in the contemporary Tibetan local cultures. Meanwhile, the Tibetan folk still has a large proportion of modifying to traditional culture. Moreover, the Tibetans’ cultural adjusted differences in the affective and cognitive dimensions are smaller than the acculturate features in the behavioral side. However, the cultural adjusted distinctions in the affective and cognitive aspects compared to that in the behavioral field are more complex. Moreover, there are direct and mediating effects that impact the Tibetan folks’ cultural adaptability. Studying Tibetan people’s cultural adaptation may be conducive to understanding the evolution of Tibetan locality’s meaning and the mutual game between the two different parts in local culture as well as comprehending the Tibetan folks’ real cultural appeal. The conclusions have important practical significance of the harmony, stability, unity, progress, and information in China ethnic areas’ economy, society, and culture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Cultural Management) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle
Event and Sustainable Culture-Led Regeneration: Lessons from the 2008 European Capital of Culture, Liverpool
Sustainability 2019, 11(7), 1869; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11071869 - 28 Mar 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Culture-led regeneration has been widely accepted by European cities as an important component of urban renewal and sustainable development. However, the instrumental role of culture in urban regeneration has revealed several controversies. The study aims at contributing to the debate on urban cultural [...] Read more.
Culture-led regeneration has been widely accepted by European cities as an important component of urban renewal and sustainable development. However, the instrumental role of culture in urban regeneration has revealed several controversies. The study aims at contributing to the debate on urban cultural policy and management by answering two research questions: What are the key success factors for sustainable culture-led regeneration? How can cities strike a balance between the dilemmas of culture-led regeneration? Based on a case study of Liverpool as the 2008 European Capital of Culture, this research draws on long-term and multi-faceted data. The study period is from 2007 to 2018, with a view to tracking the long-term impact of event. Liverpool’s strategies for sustainable culture-led regeneration are investigated from three aspects: cultural funding dilemma, economic dilemma and spatial dilemma. The findings reveal that incorporating events in a city’s long-term regeneration trajectory, continued support and enhancement of local cultural processes and structures, and highlighting community involvement and development are major factors to ensure the cultural sustainability of event. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Cultural Management) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle
Achieving Cultural Sustainability in Museums: A Step Toward Sustainable Development
Sustainability 2019, 11(4), 970; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11040970 - 14 Feb 2019
Cited by 13
Abstract
Cultural sustainability is increasingly being perceived as a fourth dimension of sustainable development. So far, some studies have debated the way in which cultural sustainability can lead to economic, social, and environmental benefits, while others have highlighted how the classic pillars of sustainability [...] Read more.
Cultural sustainability is increasingly being perceived as a fourth dimension of sustainable development. So far, some studies have debated the way in which cultural sustainability can lead to economic, social, and environmental benefits, while others have highlighted how the classic pillars of sustainability can help museums to achieve their core cultural mission. However, empirical studies regarding cultural sustainability in museums are scarce. Thus, one of the aims of our research was to fill this gap by developing several econometric models that explain the influence of heritage exposure; environmental behavior; openness to the public; and effectiveness and performance in collecting, preserving, and researching the cultural heritage. A second aim was to advance the current knowledge in this field by creating an integrated frame that explains the interconnections between different variables that help museums become sustainable, as well as the place and role of cultural sustainability within the overall framework of sustainable development. To achieve these goals, an in-depth analysis of the literature was followed by a survey of 86 Romanian museums. The results show that the ability of museums to reach cultural sustainability is influenced by components of their social and economic performance, while environmental behavior proved to be insignificant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Cultural Management) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle
Filmmaking and Crowdfunding: A Right Match?
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 799; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030799 - 03 Feb 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Broadly defined, culture is deemed the fourth pillar of sustainable development and increasing attention is currently being paid to how it can access all potential financial resources. In Europe, film production benefits from public financial support; however, film projects require large amounts of [...] Read more.
Broadly defined, culture is deemed the fourth pillar of sustainable development and increasing attention is currently being paid to how it can access all potential financial resources. In Europe, film production benefits from public financial support; however, film projects require large amounts of money to be completed and this support may prove insufficient in comparison with the actual need. This raises the question of identifying alternative financial resources that filmmakers could benefit from. Crowdfunding has recently emerged as a funding option for all the creative-cultural industries in general and for film production in particular. However, Romania’s capacity to use this alternative financial source is one of the lowest in Europe. In this context, the aim of the article is to study Romanian filmmakers’ attitudes towards crowdfunding and its perceived suitability for financing film projects. The research method consists in a survey based on self-administered questionnaires and semi-structured interviews with Romanian film producers. Although the largest majority of film producers have not used crowdfunding due to lack of awareness or scepticism, the paper discusses, based on experts’ opinion, how this method can become a viable source of finance for the film industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Cultural Management) Printed Edition available
Open AccessArticle
Sustainable Management of Contemporary Art Galleries: A Delphi Survey for the Spanish Art Market
Sustainability 2019, 11(2), 541; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020541 - 21 Jan 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The art market operates in a very different way from conventional economic markets, ranging from its behaviors of supply and demand, the trading of goods, and the economic agents intervening in it. In addition, it is a highly unregulated market, with very little [...] Read more.
The art market operates in a very different way from conventional economic markets, ranging from its behaviors of supply and demand, the trading of goods, and the economic agents intervening in it. In addition, it is a highly unregulated market, with very little standardized information in economic terms. This paper focuses on art galleries, which are the most influential intermediaries in the Spanish primary contemporary fine-art market and perform a role that goes beyond the mere distribution of works of art. This study develops and applies a prospective methodology based on the subjective information compiled by experts, known as the Delphi method, to identify and evaluate the factors that determine the current situation and future outlook for Spanish contemporary art galleries. The results show, on one hand, that the method employed constitutes a valid option to provide reliable information. In addition, they show that the survival of these organizations will depend on their ability to adapt to the changing conditions of the economic environment, reactivating and internationalizing demand, and redirecting their business model towards sustainable management by implementing appropriate business management models and techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Cultural Management) Printed Edition available
Open AccessArticle
Understanding Pro-Environmental Behavior in the US: Insights from Grid-Group Cultural Theory and Cognitive Sociology
Sustainability 2019, 11(2), 532; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020532 - 20 Jan 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
For almost fifty years researchers have endeavored to identify the factors that influence individuals’ performance of environmentally significant behavior, with inconsistent results. This quest has become even more urgent as newly released scientific reports provide mounting evidence of global climate change and other [...] Read more.
For almost fifty years researchers have endeavored to identify the factors that influence individuals’ performance of environmentally significant behavior, with inconsistent results. This quest has become even more urgent as newly released scientific reports provide mounting evidence of global climate change and other types of anthropogenic environmental degradation. In order to change individuals’ behavior on a large scale, it is necessary to change their habits of thinking. Using insights from Grid-group cultural theory and cognitive sociology, this mixed-methods study examined the factors that influence pro-environmental behavior among a nationally representative US sample (n = 395). Qualitative results indicate that individuals develop culturally-specific environmental socio-cognitive schemas which they use to assign meaning to the environment and guide their environmentally significant behavior. Quantitative results indicate cultural orientation, pro-environmental orientation, environment identity, and environmental influence predict pro-environmental behavior. Applying these combined theoretical perspectives to the social problem of environmental degradation could facilitate the development of targeted strategies for bringing about impactful behavioral change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Cultural Management) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle
Social Project Culture: A New Project Management Culture to Promote the Sustainable Development of Organizations
Sustainability 2019, 11(1), 202; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11010202 - 03 Jan 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
With economic development and globalization, more organizations have been cooperating with foreign enterprises, which brings not only opportunities but also management difficulties and competitions with organizations. Organizations must improve their management and adapt to changing market conditions and the requirements and needs of [...] Read more.
With economic development and globalization, more organizations have been cooperating with foreign enterprises, which brings not only opportunities but also management difficulties and competitions with organizations. Organizations must improve their management and adapt to changing market conditions and the requirements and needs of its customers to maintain and strengthen its position in the market. Management by Project (MBP) uses technical methods of modern project management (PM) to manage various tasks and activities that are considered as projects. It is an effective way to solve management problems and improve management levels and enterprise competitiveness. However, few small and medium-sized enterprises apply MBP in their operation and management processes. Therefore, this paper presents a new idea to promote the application of MBP and the formation of a PM culture within society. In this paper, we searched a major database using the systematic literature review method and analyzed the articles directly or indirectly linked to our paper to obtain literature supporting the views of this article. First, this paper presents a new kind of management culture from the social aspect, termed as Social Project Culture (SPC), which can promote sustainable development and improve the management level and efficiency of organizations by promoting MBP application across society. Second, by analyzing the SPC definition, its three functions, i.e., project management behavior, management and risk control capacity, and international competitiveness, are provided. Then, to help organizations apply this method, an evolutionary path is proposed, including the creation stage, formative stage, mature stage, and heritage stage. Finally, to ensure the continued optimization of SPC, four safeguard measures in terms of theory, institution, behavior, and ideology are proposed. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Moving Urban Sculptures towards Sustainability: The Urban Sculpture Planning System in China
Sustainability 2018, 10(12), 4802; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10124802 - 16 Dec 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Following the continuous development characterized by large-scale constructions, Chinese urban development has shifted to the promotion of refined urban space quality. Urban sculpture, an important part of public arts, has been receiving increased attention in China as an important carrier for highlighting urban [...] Read more.
Following the continuous development characterized by large-scale constructions, Chinese urban development has shifted to the promotion of refined urban space quality. Urban sculpture, an important part of public arts, has been receiving increased attention in China as an important carrier for highlighting urban characteristics, culture, and history within cultural policies. As a type of cultural capital, it offers innovative methods to address the issues of economic, social, and environmental sustainability, in particular cultural sustainability. Interdisciplinary theories of urban planning are creatively applied to guide, coordinate, and improve the sustainable production of urban sculptures in China. This research was initiated to: (1) Illustrate how urban sculptures are produced through an urban planning system in the context of China; (2) explain what kind of influencing factors in relation to sustainability exist, mainly within the framework of planning strategies and cultural policies; and (3) put forward sustainable planning strategies to produce urban sculptures. To answer the above inquiries, we reviewed more than 100 articles, plans, and government documents, and we conducted several semi-structured interviews. The article argues that urban planning strategies and policies have been conceived as strategic instruments by the Chinese municipal governments to realize sustainable development of urban sculptures. Our findings would enrich knowledge on geographic studies of public art planning through the contextualized analysis of a Chinese urban sculpture planning system. It also fills the gap in the literature on the sustainability of urban sculptures by approaching the perspectives of planning strategies and cultural policies. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Sustainable Activity of Cultural Service Consumers of Social Media Users—Influence on the Brand Capital of Cultural Institutions
Sustainability 2018, 10(11), 3986; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10113986 - 31 Oct 2018
Cited by 11
Abstract
In the second decade of the 21st century, social media changed the nature of communication and cooperation between participants of the culture services market. They became, among other things, an important marketing instrument in the area of contact with the customers of the [...] Read more.
In the second decade of the 21st century, social media changed the nature of communication and cooperation between participants of the culture services market. They became, among other things, an important marketing instrument in the area of contact with the customers of the cultural offer. However, despite their growing importance in various areas of activity of organisations in the cultural sector, the issue of building the cultural institution’s brand equity by social media users is relatively seldom raised. Research on the impact of online consumer activity on brand equity is at an early stage of development. Therefore, this article is an attempt to fill the research gap in this area. The article presents the results of a survey that was conducted in 2018 on a group of 1021 consumers of cultural services, who at the same time regularly used social media. The statistical analysis carried out and the research results obtained prove that the 3C sustainable system (3C means: consumer Consumption, Contribution, Creation) developed by the authors, concerning the activity of consumers of cultural services in social media, stimulates the consumer-based brand equity (CBBE). Statistically significant relations have been observed in particular for CBBE components that are related to the awareness of a cultural institution’s brand and for the relationship related to the perception of its quality. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
From Culture 1.0 to Culture 3.0: Three Socio-Technical Regimes of Social and Economic Value Creation through Culture, and Their Impact on European Cohesion Policies
Sustainability 2018, 10(11), 3923; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10113923 - 28 Oct 2018
Cited by 10
Abstract
We develop a new conceptual framework to analyze the evolution of the relationship between cultural production and different forms of economic and social value creation in terms of three alternative socio-technical regimes that have emerged over time. We show how, with the emergence [...] Read more.
We develop a new conceptual framework to analyze the evolution of the relationship between cultural production and different forms of economic and social value creation in terms of three alternative socio-technical regimes that have emerged over time. We show how, with the emergence of the Culture 3.0 regime characterized by novel forms of active cultural participation, where the distinction between producers and users of cultural and creative contents is increasingly blurred, new channels of social and economic value creation through cultural participation acquire increasing importance. We characterize them through an eight-tier classification, and argue on this basis why cultural policy is going to acquire a central role in the policy design approaches of the future. Whether Europe will play the role of a strategic leader in this scenario in the context of future cohesion policies is an open question. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Cultural Management) Printed Edition available
Open AccessArticle
Sustainable Consumer Behaviour in the Market of Cultural Services in Central European Countries: The Example of Poland
Sustainability 2018, 10(11), 3856; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10113856 - 24 Oct 2018
Cited by 9
Abstract
In the second decade of the 21st century, in the developed countries of Central Europe, we can observe the transfer of free time to consumption, including the consumption of cultural services. This change, however, has led to some disturbances in the consumption of [...] Read more.
In the second decade of the 21st century, in the developed countries of Central Europe, we can observe the transfer of free time to consumption, including the consumption of cultural services. This change, however, has led to some disturbances in the consumption of cultural services. Disturbances, which in particular relate to the sphere of needs, the sphere of the means of meeting needs and, finally, the sphere of consumer behaviour; for example, in relation to transport. In this article, most of the attention was devoted to the last category of disturbances (the sphere of consumer behaviour) and specifically concerned the culture service customers’ choice of means of transport to a specific cultural event. The research carried out by the authors shows that the most popular means of transport used on the way to a symphonic concert held in Katowice is still one’s own car. This applies to both residents of the city of Katowice, who could easily get to the concert using public transport (bus, tram) or on foot, as well as people from outside Katowice (who, as the research shows, very rarely use Katowice’s extensive rail network and well-developed intercity bus service). Thus, it has been proved that despite various legal regulations conducive to sustainable consumption, the majority of Polish consumers of cultural services in the analysed area of consumer behaviour do not follow this concept. The article opens with a review of the literature on free time and the sustainable consumption of cultural services. The next part of the study presents the results and conclusions of research conducted on a group of 515 consumers of philharmonic services. The last part of the article discusses the results obtained and indicates the existing management implications. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Sustainable Management of the Offer of Cultural Institutions in the Cross-Border Market for Cultural Services—Barriers and Conditions
Sustainability 2018, 10(9), 3253; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10093253 - 12 Sep 2018
Cited by 15
Abstract
The concept of sustainable management in culture has been recognised in global strategic documents on sustainable development for more than a decade. It is also increasingly reflected in the cultural polices of particular states, and—very importantly—cultural managers who are responsible for shaping the [...] Read more.
The concept of sustainable management in culture has been recognised in global strategic documents on sustainable development for more than a decade. It is also increasingly reflected in the cultural polices of particular states, and—very importantly—cultural managers who are responsible for shaping the cultural offer in cities are becoming more interested in this concept. Despite the increasing attention being paid to this topic among both practitioners and theoreticians of management, in none of these documents or other works can we find any content that is directly related to the possibility of applying this concept in a town which, due to political turmoil, has been divided by a national border. Hence, this gap was the direct impulse for taking up research in this field. In the article, by using different notions of the market, our own definition of a cross-border market for cultural services was developed, and the conditions for the functioning of this market were presented based on the example town of Cieszyn (Poland) and Český Těšín (Czech Republic). In the opinion of the authors of the article, the development and functioning of a cross-border market for cultural services is essential for the application of the concept of sustainable management of the cultural offer in a town divided by a border. For the purpose of the article, a survey and individual interviews with experts shaping the cultural offer in Cieszyn and Český Těšín were conducted. The results of the research prove that despite numerous cross-border Czech–Polish projects carried out by cultural institutions, there are still many barriers in the town, which make it difficult for the residents to benefit from the cultural offer that is available on the other side of the border. These barriers limit the full implementation and application of the concept of sustainable management of the cultural offer. Full article
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