Special Issue "Conscious Consumption"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Economic, Business and Management Aspects of Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Charles Dennis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Business School, Middlesex University, London, UK
Interests: (e-)consumer behaviour; (e-)retailing; (e-)shopping; retail innovation; digital signage
Dr. Athina Dilmperi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Business School, Middlesex University, London, UK
Interests: consumer psychology; psychological factors influencing morally dubious behaviours; sustainability; fair trade; piracy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A number of marketing scholars have highlighted the need for more research in areas that serve the public and societal interests. Furthermore, western societies are moving towards encouraging business and people to produce and consume sustainably. Socially conscious consumers are consumers who take into account the public consequences of their private consumption or who attempt to use their purchasing power to affect in social change (Webster, 1975). Conscious consumption research includes subjects relating to social, green, fair-trade, not tested on animals, and environmentally friendly consumption. For this Special Issue, all submissions linked to conscious consumption and sustainability are welcomed, although we will give particular preference to submissions linking conscious consumption with the consequent disposal stage, including, for example, discarding and recycling, donations and reselling; the usage stage, the pre-consumption activities, shared consumption, and consumption rituals; and the desire stage, focusing on needs wants and motivation.

The editors welcome contributions reflecting different disciplinary perspectives, methodological approaches, and international and cross-cultural contexts. While empirical papers are strongly encouraged, theoretical and conceptual contributions are also appreciated.

Prof. Dr. Charles Dennis
Dr. Athina Dilmperi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable consumption
  • conscious consumption
  • reduced consumption
  • conservation consumption
  • sharing consumption
  • reusing, recycling, re-selling, donating
  • fair trade

Published Papers (17 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Consumer Competence Strategies, Spiritually Inspired Core Values and Locus of Control: What Are the Links?
Sustainability 2019, 11(17), 4787; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11174787 - 02 Sep 2019
Abstract
Ethical consumption has increased as a result of a more pressing environmental agenda, allowing consumers to assert their core values through marketplace decisions. The progressive secularisation of society has opened a gap on how religion and spirituality, defined in this paper as constructs [...] Read more.
Ethical consumption has increased as a result of a more pressing environmental agenda, allowing consumers to assert their core values through marketplace decisions. The progressive secularisation of society has opened a gap on how religion and spirituality, defined in this paper as constructs that underpin core values, affect individuals through their consumption choices. An exploratory approach was taken in this research to investigate how consumers negotiate their daily shopping habits, whether they align with or diverge from their religious or secular core values, and whether an internal or external locus of control (LoC) was demonstrated. This qualitative study used the theory of reasoned action and applied an interpretative paradigm, being most interested in the lived experience of the 25 participants. They were recruited from religious, spiritual, and secular backgrounds, following a purposeful sampling strategy. The participants kept a 2-week daily diary detailing spending decisions and were interviewed, also to provide the opportunity to discuss their diary entries. Findings reveal the direction of linkage between constructs such as core values, LoC orientation and Consumer Competence strategies. The study also revealed how religious participants were subject to a moral dualism that at times created dissonance between their core values and their consumer behaviour. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conscious Consumption)
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Open AccessArticle
Analysis of the Consciousness of University Undergraduates for Sustainable Consumption
Sustainability 2019, 11(17), 4597; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11174597 - 23 Aug 2019
Abstract
This research seeks to measure the degree of consciousness for sustainable consumption in a wide sample of university students. The interest of this study is to analyze if students’ choice of degree, as well as their progress in university education, influences the development [...] Read more.
This research seeks to measure the degree of consciousness for sustainable consumption in a wide sample of university students. The interest of this study is to analyze if students’ choice of degree, as well as their progress in university education, influences the development of the dimensions that construct the consciousness for sustainable consumption. The study is completed by means of a questionnaire survey aimed at first and final year students of seven university degrees across four different faculties. A factorial analysis of principal components is performed to analyze the dimensions of sustainability and robust contrasts of mean differences are conducted to observe the differences by degrees and years. The results indicate that the measurement scale of the variable consciousness for sustainable consumption maintains its original structure when applied to a sample of Spanish university students. Although there are significant differences by degree in the development of awareness about sustainable consumption, the authors cannot conclude that the training received at the degree level helps to improve the level of awareness of students in their decisions for responsible behavior in consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conscious Consumption)
Open AccessArticle
Exploring Socio-Cognitive Mindfulness in the Context of Sustainable Consumption
Sustainability 2019, 11(13), 3692; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11133692 - 05 Jul 2019
Abstract
Mindfulness has been presented as a consumer characteristic mitigating negative environmental effects of overconsumption. This study argues that consumers’ propensity to engage in sustainable consumption behaviors additionally depends on individual values and beliefs, developing a more nuanced view of mindfulness in this particular [...] Read more.
Mindfulness has been presented as a consumer characteristic mitigating negative environmental effects of overconsumption. This study argues that consumers’ propensity to engage in sustainable consumption behaviors additionally depends on individual values and beliefs, developing a more nuanced view of mindfulness in this particular domain of consumer behavior. Based on an online survey among 546 American consumers, the study finds that mindfulness not only affects a set of sustainable consumption behaviors directly, but also has an impact on environmental concern and perceived consumer effectiveness, accounting for an indirect positive effect of mindfulness through these values and beliefs. Materialism is negatively associated with mindfulness. However, certain forms of sustainable consumption behaviors may offer a pathway for materialist consumers to participate in sustainable consumption. Research findings indicate that increased mindfulness may be effective in changing daily consumption routines, helping to reduce negative environmental impacts of overconsumption, particularly in populations with increased environmental concern and perceived consumer effectiveness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conscious Consumption)
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Open AccessArticle
Pro-Environmental Behaviours and Value-Belief-Norm Theory: Assessing Unobserved Heterogeneity of Two Ethnic Groups
Sustainability 2019, 11(12), 3237; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11123237 - 12 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Previous environmental sustainability studies have examined only limited type of pro-environmental behaviour (PEB; e.g., recycling), but have not explored relationships among various types or dimensions of PEBs. This paper explores six types of PEBs (i.e., activist, avoider, green consumer, green passenger, recycler and [...] Read more.
Previous environmental sustainability studies have examined only limited type of pro-environmental behaviour (PEB; e.g., recycling), but have not explored relationships among various types or dimensions of PEBs. This paper explores six types of PEBs (i.e., activist, avoider, green consumer, green passenger, recycler and utility saver) and investigates their antecedents and interrelationships between two ethnic groups—Malays and Chinese in Malaysia. Survey data from 581 respondents, comprising 307 Malays and 274 Chinese, were used to assess the research model. To conduct multi-group analysis, the study used partial least squares structural equation modelling in SmartPLS 3. The study extends the Value-Belief-Norm (VBN) theory by using social norms to predict PEBs. The results suggest that social norms predict each type of PEB, in contrast to other constructs in VBN theory, except for utility-saving behaviours. The findings also reveal some similarities as well as differences between Malays and Chinese, indicating that the two ethnic groups are not homogeneous. The study is the first to simultaneously study six types of PEB and to examine the differences between Malays and Chinese on PEB constructs and offers a valuable contribution to the literature by extending VBN theory to social norms and PEB. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conscious Consumption)
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Open AccessArticle
Antecedents of Consumers’ Intention to Purchase Energy-Efficient Appliances: An Empirical Study Based on the Technology Acceptance Model and Theory of Planned Behavior
Sustainability 2019, 11(10), 2994; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11102994 - 27 May 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Personal consumption behavior has negative impacts on the environment, such as climate change and wasted resources. To eliminate the adverse effects, more manufacturers are producing environmentally friendly products and governments are encouraging residents to adopt energy-saving products. Among these products, energy-efficient appliances are [...] Read more.
Personal consumption behavior has negative impacts on the environment, such as climate change and wasted resources. To eliminate the adverse effects, more manufacturers are producing environmentally friendly products and governments are encouraging residents to adopt energy-saving products. Among these products, energy-efficient appliances are designed to save energy in everyday life. In this research, we focused on examining the antecedents of consumers’ acceptance of energy-efficient appliances. A combined framework of the technology acceptance model and the theory of planned behavior was used. The research was empirically tested using an online survey of 280 consumers. The study indicates that perceived ease of use had a significant impact on perceived usefulness; moreover, it positively influenced consumers’ attitudes. Subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and attitude significantly affected consumers’ purchasing intention. However, perceived usefulness did not have direct significant effect on consumers’ purchasing intention. Furthermore, we conducted a comparative analysis to further analyze the effect of consumers’ awareness of the China Energy Label on their purchasing intentions. Finally, insights and suggestions are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conscious Consumption)
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Open AccessArticle
The Effects of Online Shopping Context Cues on Consumers’ Purchase Intention for Cross-Border E-Commerce Sustainability
Sustainability 2019, 11(10), 2777; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11102777 - 15 May 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
China is currently the world’s largest cross-border e-commerce purchaser and destination country. Therefore, how to promote consumer online shopping is the most important goal for cross-border e-commerce sustainability. Meanwhile, the previous research has not empirically verified the precise effect of online shopping context [...] Read more.
China is currently the world’s largest cross-border e-commerce purchaser and destination country. Therefore, how to promote consumer online shopping is the most important goal for cross-border e-commerce sustainability. Meanwhile, the previous research has not empirically verified the precise effect of online shopping context and perceived value on consumers’ cross-border online purchase intention. To address this gap, this study analyzes the online shopping context that determines consumers’ purchase intention and innovatively identifies four cues that promote this consumption behavior in cross-border e-commerce, such as online promotion cues, content marketing cues, personalized recommendation cues, and social review cues. It proposes a theoretical model based on cue utilization theory and stimulus-organism-response model, which introduces this four cues and brand familiarity in analyzing the effects on consumers’ purchase intention in cross-border online shopping (CBOS). In addition, the paper examines the mediating role of perceived functional value and perceived emotional value. Survey data collected 372 cross-border online consumers from China and the PLS-SEM method was used to empirically test the proposed model. The results show that these four cross-border online shopping context cues have a significantly positive impact on consumers’ purchase intention. Brand familiarity has significantly negative moderating effects between the four cues and the perceived functional value, while brand familiarity also negatively moderates the relationship between online promotion cues, social review cues, and perceived emotional value, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conscious Consumption)
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Open AccessArticle
Acquiescence or Resistance: Group Norms and Self-Interest Motivation in Unethical Consumer Behaviour
Sustainability 2019, 11(8), 2190; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11082190 - 12 Apr 2019
Abstract
Understanding why consumers behave unethically has gained scholarly attention; many studies have examined it from psychological or social environmental perspectives. However, few studies provide the link between internal and external factors associated with unethical behaviours, and few studies explain why consumers ‘behave unethically [...] Read more.
Understanding why consumers behave unethically has gained scholarly attention; many studies have examined it from psychological or social environmental perspectives. However, few studies provide the link between internal and external factors associated with unethical behaviours, and few studies explain why consumers ‘behave unethically knowingly’ in a China-specific context. Based on moral disengagement theory, the current research aims to provide a comprehensive developmental model to investigate how group norms and self-interest motivation affect consumers’ unethical behavioural intentions and to analyse the mechanism of ‘behaving unethically knowingly’. Findings from online surveys of 360 participants indicate that group recognition and an egoism motivation have positive effects on consumers’ unethical behavioural intentions, while group veto and an altruistic motivation have negative effects on unethical behavioural intentions; moral disengagement mediates the relationship between group recognition, group veto, egoism motivation, altruistic motivation and unethical behavioural intentions; moral identity negatively moderates the relationship between group recognition, altruistic motivation and unethical behavioural intentions. The theoretical and practical implications are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conscious Consumption)
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Open AccessArticle
Attitudes of Voluntary Simplifier University Students in Hungary
Sustainability 2019, 11(6), 1802; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11061802 - 25 Mar 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The Lifestyle of Voluntary Simplicity (LOVOS) segment is composed of consumers who attempt to achieve sustainable consumption. The segment has been examined by only a few research studies so far, and none of them were conducted among Hungarian consumers. Therefore, the aim of [...] Read more.
The Lifestyle of Voluntary Simplicity (LOVOS) segment is composed of consumers who attempt to achieve sustainable consumption. The segment has been examined by only a few research studies so far, and none of them were conducted among Hungarian consumers. Therefore, the aim of our exploratory research is to examine the occurrence of the LOVOS consumer group among university students from Debrecen, Hungary. To achieve our aim, we first identified the five main value groups of the LOVOS lifestyle with an expert focus group interview. Based on the interview, a questionnaire survey was conducted among university students from Debrecen (N = 500). Based on the results, four value-based segments were identified, of which the Voluntary simplifiers’ cluster (39.6% of respondents) reflected the characteristics of the LOVOS lifestyle to the greatest extent. Based on the literature, it seemed necessary to segment this group further in terms of their commitment to individual values. As a result, three further clusters were created, of which, the Holistic simplifiers’ group (9.8% of respondents) showed the greatest commitment to the values of the LOVOS lifestyle. We concluded that the characteristics of voluntary simplifiers have already appeared among university students from Debrecen, but further research is needed to reveal the value orientation of the whole of Hungarian society. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conscious Consumption)
Open AccessArticle
Empirical Study Regarding Non-Financial Disclosure for Social Conscious Consumption in the Spanish E-Credit Market
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 866; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030866 - 07 Feb 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Non-financial disclosure is an objective in The European Union to improve a sustainable economy where consumers can make conscious decisions, especially regarding the role of financial technology. Complete information is considered one that offers financial and non-financial information. Government and supranational authorities are [...] Read more.
Non-financial disclosure is an objective in The European Union to improve a sustainable economy where consumers can make conscious decisions, especially regarding the role of financial technology. Complete information is considered one that offers financial and non-financial information. Government and supranational authorities are starting to promulgate rules to construct a reasonable framework for non-financial disclosure. One consumer might make a social conscious decision if the information disclosed meets to the Directive 2014/95/UE guidelines. In order to analyse this condition in the e-credit market in Spain, this research measures the rank of compliance of European standards in non-financial disclosure. The main finding of this research is that non-financial information disclosure in the Spanish e-credit market is not sufficient to make informed decisions. Due to the fact that most of the non-financial information is focused on social issues related to a company´s commitment to sustainability, non-financial information plays a relevant role in the building of an economically sustainable society. Our findings show that the level of non-financial disclosure in the Spanish e-Credit market is low, what supposes there is not an adequate informative base to decision making according to European standards on non-financial information. By considering the effect of usual disclosure drivers in this research field, the e-credit market sector was the only positive factor to disclose more non-financial information. Nevertheless, company size, company seniority and company location were not significant factors for non-financial disclosure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conscious Consumption)
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Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of an Educational Campaign to Improve the Conscious Consumption of Recreationally Caught Fish
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 700; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030700 - 29 Jan 2019
Abstract
Consumption guidelines are a common way of improving conscious consumption behaviors in areas where game fish are known to contain contaminants. However, guideline information can be difficult to distribute, and effectiveness difficult to measure. To increase the distribution and effectiveness of guideline information [...] Read more.
Consumption guidelines are a common way of improving conscious consumption behaviors in areas where game fish are known to contain contaminants. However, guideline information can be difficult to distribute, and effectiveness difficult to measure. To increase the distribution and effectiveness of guideline information for the Detroit River, an educational campaign was launched in 2010, which included distribution of pamphlets with consumption information, posting of permanent signs at popular fishing locations, and hiring River Walkers to personally communicate with anglers. In 2013 and 2015, we conducted in-person surveys of active shoreline anglers to determine the effectiveness of education and outreach efforts. Results from the survey indicated that 55% of anglers were aware of the guidelines in 2013, and by 2015 36% had communicated the information to family or friends. However, anglers were often unwilling to reduce consumption of popular game species, despite high contaminant levels. Encouragingly, black anglers were most likely to supplement their diet with species lower in contaminants. Our results suggest that utilizing multiple educational strategies including reaching out directly to individual anglers may improve conscious consumption behavior among the targeted population, providing a template for educational campaigns to successfully target vulnerable populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conscious Consumption)
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Open AccessArticle
A Study into Public Awareness of the Environmental Impact of Menstrual Products and Product Choice
Sustainability 2019, 11(2), 473; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020473 - 17 Jan 2019
Abstract
This paper explores the level of awareness people have about the environmental impact of menstrual products. Currently the most popular types of product are also the most detrimental to the natural environment, particularly due to the amount of hidden plastic in disposable items. [...] Read more.
This paper explores the level of awareness people have about the environmental impact of menstrual products. Currently the most popular types of product are also the most detrimental to the natural environment, particularly due to the amount of hidden plastic in disposable items. This research seeks to find out whether people realize that this is the case and whether those that are more aware of the damage are likely to make choices that are less harmful to the environment. A mixed method approach was taken, using online surveys and focus groups. The results of the study show that most participants were not aware at the amount of plastic in disposable menstrual products, and that there are other issues linked to their environmental impact that people are generally not aware of. Some participants were more aware of the issues than others and the research suggests that those with a higher awareness are more likely to choose products that are less harmful to the environment. Based on these findings, future actions and areas of further research are suggested. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conscious Consumption)
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Open AccessArticle
Impacts of Gratifications on Consumers’ Emotions and Continuance Use Intention: An Empirical Study of Weibo in China
Sustainability 2018, 10(9), 3162; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10093162 - 04 Sep 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Recently, several studies on information systems have applied the Uses and Gratifications theory to investigate individual use of social media, and have reported the role of different gratifications in predicting users’ behaviors. However, no attention was given to the influence of these gratifications [...] Read more.
Recently, several studies on information systems have applied the Uses and Gratifications theory to investigate individual use of social media, and have reported the role of different gratifications in predicting users’ behaviors. However, no attention was given to the influence of these gratifications on users’ emotional states (satisfaction and emotional commitment). To address this research gap, the current study integrates the Uses and Gratifications theory and the Stimulus-Organism-Response theory to provide a theoretical background for the impacts of gratification on consumers’ emotional states and continuance use intention. The study has proposed a theoretical model that was tested on data collected from 252 Sina Weibo users in China. The results revealed that social gratification is the most important factor influencing users’ satisfaction and emotional commitment. In addition, we report the roles that user satisfaction and emotional state provide in predicting users’ continuance intention. The theoretical and practical implications of the proposed theory are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conscious Consumption)
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Open AccessArticle
Modeling the Social Factors That Determine Sustainable Consumption Behavior in the Community of Madrid
Sustainability 2018, 10(8), 2811; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10082811 - 08 Aug 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
This paper defines the social factors that determine sustainable behavior and identifies the elements that promote such behavior. These factors are external from the individual and causal regarding sustainable behavior, an area that receives little attention in literature. It uses a theoretical model, [...] Read more.
This paper defines the social factors that determine sustainable behavior and identifies the elements that promote such behavior. These factors are external from the individual and causal regarding sustainable behavior, an area that receives little attention in literature. It uses a theoretical model, based on existing research, which is tested through a questionnaire with 26 indicators adapted to the Spanish context. In an initial analysis, this model proposed, as determining social factors in the CCS, aspects such as government action, social pressure, influence of the social environment, demographic variables (age, gender, education level), education and information, and market conditions. Finally, it was concluded that 43.4% of the variance of the endogenous latent variable (SCC) can be explained only by three exogenous latent constructions: environmental influences (in particular the influence of family and friends, as well as that generated by cultural factors such as traditions), education and information (specifically related to information on sustainability and the effects of personal consumption on the environment), and market conditions (referring to the positive perception of sustainable products by consumers, including their willingness to pay higher prices than those of conventional products). The rest of the exogenous variables did not have a significant relationship with the endogenous variable. These results are very useful for government institutions, companies that operate in the sector and pro-environmental and pro-social groups, that knowing what motivates people to adopt this form of behavior can design relevant strategies to get positive answers about the environment, the economy and the society. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conscious Consumption)
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Open AccessArticle
From Awe to Ecological Behavior: The Mediating Role of Connectedness to Nature
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2477; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072477 - 16 Jul 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Awe is a self-transcendent emotion that can diminish one’s focus on the self and serves as an important motivator of commitment to social collectives. However, the influence of awe on ecological behavior is not clear. This study examines the relationships between people’s feeling [...] Read more.
Awe is a self-transcendent emotion that can diminish one’s focus on the self and serves as an important motivator of commitment to social collectives. However, the influence of awe on ecological behavior is not clear. This study examines the relationships between people’s feeling of awe, their connectedness to nature, and ecological behavior. Three experiments tested the effect of awe on ecological behaviors including mediation tests. Compared with participants in the control condition, participants in the awe condition were more inclined to behave ecologically (Study 1 and 2) and reported a higher feeling of connectedness to nature (Study 2). Moreover, the relationship between awe and ecological behavior was mediated by connectedness to nature (Study 3). These findings indicate that awe helps broaden the self-concept by including nature and increase connectedness to nature, which in turn lead to ecological behavior. They also highlight the significance of connectedness in explaining why awe increases ecological behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conscious Consumption)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Cognitive and Affective Antecedents of Consumers’ Satisfaction: A Systematic Review of Two Research Approaches
Sustainability 2019, 11(2), 431; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020431 - 15 Jan 2019
Abstract
The study of consumers’ satisfaction has generated empirical research in the last few decades, with new challenges, such as a specific lens on online consumers’ satisfaction. During the last decades, two well-differentiated research traditions can be observed: cognitive and affective. A wide range [...] Read more.
The study of consumers’ satisfaction has generated empirical research in the last few decades, with new challenges, such as a specific lens on online consumers’ satisfaction. During the last decades, two well-differentiated research traditions can be observed: cognitive and affective. A wide range of antecedents of consumers’ satisfaction has been proposed. The present contribution empirical research conducted under these two perspectives to determine which variables are related to satisfaction, the direction of these relationships, and the differences between the two dominant approaches. We conducted a systematic review of 104 empirical studies on consumers’ satisfaction published between 1975 and 2017. The findings showed that both the cognitive and the affective tradition yield statistically significant precursors of satisfaction. A comparison between empirical studies exploring consumers’ satisfaction in traditional versus by Internet purchasing behavior showed an increasing relevance of cognitive facets in traditional consumer behavior. Empirical evidence exploring differences between consumers’ satisfaction with purchasing goods versus hiring services showed that both cognitive and affective predictors strongly impact when services are hired versus consuming goods. This article concludes with a discussion of these results and their implications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conscious Consumption)
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Other

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Open AccessConcept Paper
From Values to Behavior: Proposition of an Integrating Model
Sustainability 2019, 11(21), 6170; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11216170 - 05 Nov 2019
Abstract
Human values are at the heart of our lives. We all hold a set of values that influence our actions. The protection of the natural environment is no exception to this rule. That is why the study of human values is key to [...] Read more.
Human values are at the heart of our lives. We all hold a set of values that influence our actions. The protection of the natural environment is no exception to this rule. That is why the study of human values is key to reaching the imperative of sustainability. In this conceptual paper, we aim to (1) integrate the key theories and models explaining the influence of human values on behavior and to (2) identify factors that might have previously been overlooked. Drawing from a range of disciplines, this article proposes an integrated model mapping the influence of human values on behavior. It also puts forward the concept of consequences as an emerging factor that could play an important role in this relationship. Recommendations are to extend the research to an empirical investigation of the model and to develop the definition of the concept of consequences and the role they play in the influence of values on consumer behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conscious Consumption)
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Open AccessConcept Paper
The Determinant Factors of Travelers’ Choices for Pro-Environment Behavioral Intention-Integration Theory of Planned Behavior, Unified Theory of Acceptance, and Use of Technology 2 and Sustainability Values
Sustainability 2018, 10(6), 1869; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10061869 - 04 Jun 2018
Cited by 6
Abstract
From a previous literature review, there are rare studies that focus on integrating Sustainability Values (SVs), the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), and Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT2) to predict potential travelers’ behavioral intentions. In light of this, the [...] Read more.
From a previous literature review, there are rare studies that focus on integrating Sustainability Values (SVs), the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), and Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT2) to predict potential travelers’ behavioral intentions. In light of this, the research is designed to propose a comprehensive understanding of potential travelers’ choices for sustainable hospitality businesses by integrating SV, TPB, and UTAUT2 into a theoretical framework, by moderating the effect of age. Prior studies have mentioned TPB identified the role of attitude, perceived behavior control, and moral obligation in generating intention. However, the use of TPB and the extended UTAUT model to explain pro-environmental behavior is lacking. Data was collected from 34 northern, 2 central, and 6 southern Taiwanese consolidated headquarter travel agencies. Email questionnaires were distributed to 630 individuals in 42 travel agencies. The proposed model will be also examining, with an AMOS procedure of structural equation modeling (SEM), the maximum likelihood method of estimation. The results indicated that (1) SVs are positively and significantly impacted by pro-environmental behavioral intention; (2) SVs are positively and significantly impacted by attitude, social influence, perceived behavioral control, and habit respectively; (3) attitude, perceived behavioral control, and habit is positively mediated by the effect between SVs and pro-environmental behavioral intention, respectively; (4) the social demographic variable of age is positively moderated the effect between SVs and social influence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conscious Consumption)
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