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Special Issue "Advances in Ultrasonic Guided Wave Sensor Technologies for Structural Health Monitoring"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Tat-Hean Gan

Brunel University London, Brunel Innovation Centre, Uxbridge, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: ultrasonic guided waves; non-destructive testing; artificial intelligence; non-contact ultrasonics; Industry 4.0; signal processing; sensors; instrumentations
Guest Editor
Dr. Shehan Lowe

Brunel University London, Brunel Innovation Centre, Uxbridge, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: ultrasonic guided waves; non-destructive testing; acoustics; sensor development; numerical modelling; signal processing
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Wamadeva Balachandran

Brunel University London, Brunel Innovation Centre, Uxbridge, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: guided wave measurement; electromagnetic acoustic transducers; Lab-on-a-chip; electromagnetic field sensing; global positioning satellite system and MEMS

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ultrasonic Guided Wave (UGW) testing has gained greater attention from the industry for its inherent capability of long-range inspection. This technology is widely used as a screening tool in many industries, e.g., oil and gas, renewable energy, naval, construction, and aerospace. Recent attempts have been made to improve the resolution and sensitivity of UGW sensors for quantitative measurements of structural health and also to inspect complex structures, e.g., glass laminate aluminium reinforced epoxy, and carbon fiber reinforced polymer.  
This Special Issue is aimed to the submission of both review and original research articles related to the advancement of UGW sensor development, signal processing, and applications of UGW for structural assessment. Topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Non-destructive testing and material characterisation
  • The inspection of complex material and structures using UGW
  • Flexible sensor development
  • UGW imaging and visualisation
  • Industrial applications
  • The remote monitoring of structural health

Prof. Dr. Tat-Hean Gan
Dr. Shehan Lowe
Prof. Dr. Wamadeva Balachandran
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Ultrasonic guided wave
  • Acoustic sensing
  • Sensor development
  • Signal processing
  • Numerical modelling
  • Non-destructive testing
  • Imaging
  • Composite inspection
  • Material characterization
  • Automation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Improved SH0 Guided Wave Transducers Based on Piezoelectric Fiber Patches
Sensors 2019, 19(13), 2990; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19132990
Received: 15 May 2019 / Revised: 25 June 2019 / Accepted: 4 July 2019 / Published: 6 July 2019
PDF Full-text (7227 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
A piezoelectric fiber patch (PFP) is a transducer type that is suitable for guided-wave-based structural health monitoring (SHM) due to its light, thin, and flexible characteristics. In our previous work, a PFP-based transducer design for selective excitation of the zero-order shear horizontal wave [...] Read more.
A piezoelectric fiber patch (PFP) is a transducer type that is suitable for guided-wave-based structural health monitoring (SHM) due to its light, thin, and flexible characteristics. In our previous work, a PFP-based transducer design for selective excitation of the zero-order shear horizontal wave mode (SH0) was introduced (shear horizontal PFP (SHPFP)). In this work, two modified SH0 wave PFP transducer designs are proposed: the rounded corner design and the dual design. The degree of improvement is determined by a numerical simulation and the dual design—the design with the most promise—is experimentally realized. Laser Vibrometry measured the generated wave field, confirming the results from the simulation. The new designs can generate an almost pure SH0 wave. The dual design has a very strong directivity that is useful for several guided-wave-based SHM applications. The conclusions on the design’s properties as a transmitter are also valid for its properties as a sensor due to the reciprocity of piezoelectric transducers. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization and Design Improvement of a Thickness-Shear Lead Zirconate Titanate Transducer for Low Frequency Ultrasonic Guided Wave Applications
Sensors 2019, 19(8), 1848; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19081848
Received: 20 February 2019 / Revised: 4 April 2019 / Accepted: 11 April 2019 / Published: 18 April 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (6002 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Thickness-shear transducers for guided wave testing have been used in industry for over two decades and much research has been conducted to improve the resolution and sensitivity. Due to a geometric feature of the current state-of-the art transducer, there is an out-of-plane component [...] Read more.
Thickness-shear transducers for guided wave testing have been used in industry for over two decades and much research has been conducted to improve the resolution and sensitivity. Due to a geometric feature of the current state-of-the art transducer, there is an out-of-plane component in the propagation direction of the fundamental shear horizontal mode which complicates the signal interpretation. In such case, complex signal processing techniques need to be used for mode discrimination to assess the structural health with higher precision. Therefore, it is important to revise the transducer design to eliminate the out-of-plane components in the propagation direction of fundamental shear horizontal mode. This will enhance the mode purity of fundamental shear horizontal mode for its application in guided wave inspection. A numerical investigation has been conducted on a 3 mm thick 2 m circular steel plate to understand the behaviour and the characteristics of the state-of-the-art thickness-shear transducer. Based on the results, it is noted that the redesigning the electrode arrangement will suppress the out-of-plane components on the propagation direction of the fundamental shear horizontal mode. With the aid of this information current state-of-the-art transducers were redesigned and tested in laboratory conditions using the 3D Laser Doppler Vibrometer. This information will aid future transducer designers improve the resolution of thickness-shear transducers for guided wave applications and reduce the weight and cost of transducer array by eliminating the need of additional transducers to suppress spurious modes. Full article
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Figure 1

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