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Special Issue "Water and Health pH Sensors"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Matiar Howlader
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada
Interests: soft and hard materials integration; wearable electrochemical sensors; sweat pH and glucose sensing; glutamate sensing; cannabis sensing; water pH and heavy metals sensing; two-dimensional nanomaterials; energy harvesting; surface activated nanobonding
Prof. Dr. Jamal Deen
Website
Guest Editor
Electrical and Computer Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada
Interests: Smart sensors for health and environmental applications; Flexible sensors; Nanotechnology; Miro-/Nano-/Opto-electronics; Data analytics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sensors for measuring pH have wide applications, ranging from water to health to environmental monitoring. pH is an important indicator of the quality of water and health conditions. Recently, considerable interest has been shown for wearable sensors for the early prediction of diseases through the non-invasive analysis of bodily fluids like sweat, saliva, and urine. Appropriate pH assures drinking water safety, the survivability of marine organisms, and homeostasis maintenance. pH in harsh conditions, such as mining and waste water, is critical and may severely affect the environment. The precise measurement of pH is crucial for such applications. Consequently, a wide range of pH sensing techniques ranging from optical to electrochemical to physicochemical methods have been developed. Structural and sensing materials including metal, metal oxides, polymers, semiconductors, as well as nanomaterials (i.e., nanoparticles, nanotubes, and two-dimensional (2D) materials), which need to be identified and connected in small form to create integrated pH systems.

The aim of this Special Issue on pH sensors for water and health monitoring applications is to offer the latest cutting-edge research and development of pH sensor technologies for water and health monitoring. This issue seeks to publish recent advances in the fabrication of wearable pH sensors, water pH sensors, environmental (i.e., mining) pH sensors, precision sensing performance, and integration challenges. Both experimental and theoretical articles will be published in this Special Issue, focusing on the current-state-of-the-art pH sensing materials, sensing techniques, sensing mechanisms, and the engineering and development of small footprint integrated sensors for the precise measurement of pH in water and wearable sensing applications.

Prof. Dr. Matiar Howlader
Prof. Dr. Jamal Deen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pH sensors
  • Electrochemical sensing
  • Optical sensing
  • Physicochemical sensing
  • Water monitoring
  • Wearable pH sensors for sweat, saliva, and urine
  • Metal, metal-oxide, semiconductors, and polymers
  • 2D materials
  • Low-cost fabrication
  • Integrated pH systems

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Valve-Actuator-Integrated Reference Electrode for an Ultra-Long-Life Rumen pH Sensor
Sensors 2020, 20(5), 1249; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20051249 - 25 Feb 2020
Abstract
We demonstrated a newly developed Ag/AgCl reference electrode- with a valve-actuator for two years or longer rumen pH monitoring. Previous studies on pH sensors reported that the short lifetime of Ag/AgCl reference electrodes is caused by an outflow of internal electrolyte. We introduced [...] Read more.
We demonstrated a newly developed Ag/AgCl reference electrode- with a valve-actuator for two years or longer rumen pH monitoring. Previous studies on pH sensors reported that the short lifetime of Ag/AgCl reference electrodes is caused by an outflow of internal electrolyte. We introduced a valve-actuator into a liquid junction to reduce the outflow by intermittent measurement. The results indicated that the potential change when switching the liquid junction was less than 0.5 mV and its response time was less than 0.083 s. In the 24-h potential measurement with the valve-actuator-integrated reference electrode (VAIRE), the valve was actuated once every hour, and the standard deviation of the potential was 0.29 mV. The lifetime of the VAIRE was estimated at 2.0 years calculating from an electrolyte outflow, which is significantly longer than that of conventional reference electrodes. A pH sensor using the VAIRE was estimated to operate for 2.0 years with the pH error ≤0.1, which meets the requirement of cows’ rumen pH monitoring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water and Health pH Sensors)
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Open AccessArticle
Inline Reticulorumen pH as an Indicator of Cows Reproduction and Health Status
Sensors 2020, 20(4), 1022; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20041022 - 14 Feb 2020
Abstract
Our study hypothesis is that the interline registered pH of the cow reticulum can be used as an indicator of health and reproductive status. The main objective of this study was to examine the relationship of pH, using the indicators of the automatic [...] Read more.
Our study hypothesis is that the interline registered pH of the cow reticulum can be used as an indicator of health and reproductive status. The main objective of this study was to examine the relationship of pH, using the indicators of the automatic milking system (AMS), with some parameters of cow blood components. The following four main groups were used to classify cow health status: 15–30 d postpartum, 1–34 d after insemination, 35 d after insemination (not pregnant), and 35 d (pregnant). Using the reticulum pH assay, the animals were categorized as pH < 6.22 (5.3% of cows), pH 6.22–6.42 (42.1% of cows), pH 2.6–6.62 (21.1% of cows), and pH > 6.62 (10.5% of cows). Using milking robots, milk yield, fat protein, lactose level, somatic cell count, and electron conductivity were registered. Other parameters assessed included the temperature and pH of the contents of reticulorumens. Assessment of the aforementioned parameters was done using specific smaX-tec boluses. Blood gas parameters were assessed using a blood gas analyzer (EPOC (Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Erlangen, Germany). The study findings indicated that pregnant cows have a higher pH during insemination than that of non-pregnant ones. It was also noted that cows with a low fat/protein ratio, lactose level, and high SCC had low reticulorumen pH. They also had the lowest blood pH. It was also noted that, with the increase of reticulorumen pH, there was an increased level of blood potassium, a high hematocrit, and low sodium and carbon dioxide saturation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water and Health pH Sensors)
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