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Special Issue "Development of Electrochemical Sensors Based on Naturally Occuring Compounds"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Rasa Pauliukaite
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nanoengineering, Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanoriu Ave 231, Vilnius LT-02300, Lithuania
Interests: electroanalytical chemistry; conducting polymers; electrochemical biosensors; functional nanomaterials for electrochemistry; carbon nanomaterials

Special Issue Information

With the renaissance of electrochemical methods and electrochemical (bio)sensors, more and more of them are being developed for medical applications, smart textiles, and the food industry. For such applications, the safe use of biosensors is very important. Therefore, naturally occuring compounds are very important since they typically have the lowest toxicity when used in vitro or in vivo.

Usually, electrochemical biosensors are composed of an electrode material, a layer that increases an electroactive area, a layer that accelerates an electron transfer, and a recognition element. The latter one is in most cases a naturally obtained biological element, such as enzymes, antibodies, antigens, peptides, or DNA. Other naturally occuring compounds are usually used in both layers, increasing the electroactive area and the electron transfer. In the first one, natural polymers are used to immobilize nanomaterials, and in the second one, redox compounds are employed. Furthermore, naturally occuring compounds also can be used as protecting layers at the sensor surface in contact with a sample.

The investigation and application of naturally existing compounds, including enzymes, antobodies and other biological molecules, can be also used to prepare whole electrochemical biosensors. The investigation and characterization of such kinds of compounds in biosensing is important for applications in vitro and in vivo. The advantages, problems, and possibilities of applying naturally occuring compounds in electrochemical biosensing can be described with the key aspects outlined below.

  •     Electrodes from naturally occuring materials;
  •     The characterization of naturally occuring compounds for possible application in electrochemical biosensors;
  •     Nanoparticles from naturally occuring compounds;
  •     Naturally existing polymers and their application to electrochemical biosensing;
  •     The polymerization of naturally occuring monomers for application in electrochemical biosensors;
  •     Novel approaches to use enzymes, antobodies and other naturally abundant recognition elements in electrochemical biosensors;
  •     The development of electrochemical biosensors for application in vitro or in vivo using natural compounds;
  •     Smart textile with electrochemical sensors.

 

Keywords

  • Electrodes from naturally occuring materials;
  • The characterization of naturally occuring compounds for possible application in electrochemical biosensors;
  • Nanoparticles from naturally occuring compounds;
  • Naturally existing polymers and their application to electrochemical biosensing;
  • The polymerization of naturally occuring monomers for application in electrochemical biosensors;
  • Novel approaches to use enzymes, antobodies and other naturally occuring recognition elements in electrochemical biosensors;
  • The development of electrochemical biosensors for application in vitro or in vivo using natural compounds;
  • Smart textile with electrochemical sensors.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Synergetic Sensing Effect of Sodium Carboxymethyl Cellulose and Bismuth on Cadmium Detection by Differential Pulse Anodic Stripping Voltammetry
Sensors 2019, 19(24), 5482; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19245482 - 12 Dec 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 705
Abstract
In the present work, a novel electrochemical sensor was developed for the detection of trace cadmium with high sensitivity and selectivity in an easy and eco-friendly way. Firstly, a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was modified with nontoxic sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) by a [...] Read more.
In the present work, a novel electrochemical sensor was developed for the detection of trace cadmium with high sensitivity and selectivity in an easy and eco-friendly way. Firstly, a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was modified with nontoxic sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) by a simple drop-casting method, which was applied to detect cadmium by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) in a solution containing both target cadmium and eco-friendly bismuth ions, based on a quick electro-codeposition of these two metal ions on the surface of the modified electrode (CMC-GCE). Investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), both CMC (with good film-forming ability) and bismuth (with well-defined stripping signal) were found to be well complexed with target cadmium, leading to vital signal amplification for cadmium detection at a sub-nanomolar level. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed sensor exhibited a good linear stripping signal response to cadmium (Ⅱ) ion, in a concentration range of 0.001 μmol/L–1 μmol/L with a limit of detection of 0.75 nmol/L (S/N = 3). Meanwhile, the results demonstrate that this novel electrochemical sensor has excellent sensitivity and reproducibility, which can be used as a promising detection technique for testing natural samples such as tap water. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Multisensor Systems and Arrays for Medical Applications Employing Naturally-Occurring Compounds and Materials
Sensors 2020, 20(12), 3551; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20123551 - 23 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 873
Abstract
The significant improvement of quality of life achieved over the last decades has stimulated the development of new approaches in medicine to take into account the personal needs of each patient. Precision medicine, providing healthcare customization, opens new horizons in the diagnosis, treatment [...] Read more.
The significant improvement of quality of life achieved over the last decades has stimulated the development of new approaches in medicine to take into account the personal needs of each patient. Precision medicine, providing healthcare customization, opens new horizons in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of numerous diseases. As a consequence, there is a growing demand for novel analytical devices and methods capable of addressing the challenges of precision medicine. For example, various types of sensors or their arrays are highly suitable for simultaneous monitoring of multiple analytes in complex biological media in order to obtain more information about the health status of a patient or to follow the treatment process. Besides, the development of sustainable sensors based on natural chemicals allows reducing their environmental impact. This review is concerned with the application of such analytical platforms in various areas of medicine: analysis of body fluids, wearable sensors, drug manufacturing and screening. The importance and role of naturally-occurring compounds in the development of electrochemical multisensor systems and arrays are discussed. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Electrochemical Biosensors Based on S-Layer Proteins
Sensors 2020, 20(6), 1721; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20061721 - 19 Mar 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1294
Abstract
Designing and development of electrochemical biosensors enable molecule sensing and quantification of biochemical compositions with multitudinous benefits such as monitoring, detection, and feedback for medical and biotechnological applications. Integrating bioinspired materials and electrochemical techniques promote specific, rapid, sensitive, and inexpensive biosensing platforms for [...] Read more.
Designing and development of electrochemical biosensors enable molecule sensing and quantification of biochemical compositions with multitudinous benefits such as monitoring, detection, and feedback for medical and biotechnological applications. Integrating bioinspired materials and electrochemical techniques promote specific, rapid, sensitive, and inexpensive biosensing platforms for (e.g., point-of-care testing). The selection of biomaterials to decorate a biosensor surface is a critical issue as it strongly affects selectivity and sensitivity. In this context, smart biomaterials with the intrinsic self-assemble capability like bacterial surface (S-) layer proteins are of paramount importance. Indeed, by forming a crystalline two-dimensional protein lattice on many sensors surfaces and interfaces, the S-layer lattice constitutes an immobilization matrix for small biomolecules and lipid membranes and a patterning structure with unsurpassed spatial distribution for sensing elements and bioreceptors. This review aims to highlight on exploiting S-layer proteins in biosensor technology for various applications ranging from detection of metal ions over small organic compounds to cells. Furthermore, enzymes immobilized on the S-layer proteins allow specific detection of several vital biomolecules. The special features of the S-layer protein lattice as part of the sensor architecture enhances surface functionalization and thus may feature an innovative class of electrochemical biosensors. Full article
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