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Special Issue "Sensors in Experimental Mechanics"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. M. Henar Miguélez
Website
Guest Editor
Engineering Mechanics, University Carlos III of Madrid, Spain
Interests: sensors in advanced manufacturing; mechanics of materials; biomechanics
Dr. J.A. Loya
Website
Guest Editor
Continuum Mechanics and Structural Analysis, University Carlos III of Madrid, Spain
Interests: sensors in mechanical characterization; composite and multifunctional materials; impact engineering; shock; micro- and nanomechanics
Dr. J. Díaz
Website
Guest Editor
Engineering Mechanics, University Carlos III of Madrid, Spain
Interests: sensors in advanced manufacturing; thermomechanics; optical methods and image processing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades, sensor development with reduced dimensions and costs and a higher data acquisition rate (optical, electronics and piezoelectronic sensors, accelerometers, etc.) have extended their use in experimental mechanics research.
The use of sensors in experimental mechanics is becoming essential for engineers to have a better understanding of complex problems. Some of these problems require the measurement of material mechanical properties or the analyses of the mechanical behavior of components and structures under different conditions (quasistatic and dynamic rates, extreme temperatures, etc.).
The aim of this Special Issue is to publish recent advances related to the use of sensors in experimental mechanics. Innovative works exploring analytical methods, numerical models, and experimental techniques calibrated or validated on the properties of sensors are particularly welcome.
We encourage theoretical, numerical, and application studies to be submitted to this Special Issue. Main topics of this Special Issue may cover but not be limited to the following topics:

  • Dynamic behavior of materials;
  • Composite and multifunctional materials;
  • Impact engineering;
  • Shock and high pressures;
  • Crashworthiness;
  • Bioengineering;
  • Dynamic fracture mechanics;
  • Fatigue;
  • Mechanical instabilities;
  • Machining;
  • Thermomechanics;
  • Optical methods and image processing;
  • Micro- and nano mechanics.

Prof. Dr. M. Henar Miguélez
Dr. J.A. Loya
Dr. J. Díaz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Strain-gauges
  • Dynamic load-cell
  • Accelerometer
  • Pressure sensor
  • Thermal sensor and scanning
  • Vibrometers
  • Laser sensors
  • Electronic/piezoelectronic sensors
  • Optical sensors, high-speed cameras, image processing
  • RX/TAC

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Validation and Improvement of a Bicycle Crank Arm Based in Numerical Simulation and Uncertainty Quantification
Sensors 2020, 20(7), 1814; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20071814 - 25 Mar 2020
Abstract
In this study, a finite element model of a bicycle crank arm are compared to experimental results. The structural integrity of the crank arm was analyzed in a universal dynamic test bench. The instrumentation used has allowed us to know the fatigue behavior [...] Read more.
In this study, a finite element model of a bicycle crank arm are compared to experimental results. The structural integrity of the crank arm was analyzed in a universal dynamic test bench. The instrumentation used has allowed us to know the fatigue behavior of the component tested. For this, the prototype was instrumented with three rectangular strain gauge rosettes bonded in areas where failure was expected. With the measurements made by strain gauges and the forces registers from the load cell used, it has been possible to determine the state of the stresses for different loads and boundary conditions, which has subsequently been compared with a finite element model. The simulations show a good agreement with the experimental results, when the potential sources of uncertainties are considered in the validation process. This analysis allowed us to improve the original design, reducing its weight by 15%. The study allows us to identify the manufacturing process that requires the best metrological control to avoid premature crank failure. Finally, the numerical fatigue analysis carried out allows us to conclude that the new crank arm can satisfy the structural performance demanded by the international bicycle standard. Additionally, it can be suggested to the standard to include the verification that no permanent deformations have occurred in the crank arm during the fatigue test. It has been observed that, in some cases this bicycle component fulfils the minimum safety requirements, but presents areas with plastic strains, which if not taken into account can increase the risk of injury for the cyclist due to unexpected failure of the component. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors in Experimental Mechanics)
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Open AccessArticle
A Strain-Based Intelligent Tire to Detect Contact Patch Features for Complex Maneuvers
Sensors 2020, 20(6), 1750; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20061750 - 21 Mar 2020
Abstract
Tires are essential components of vehicles and are able to transmit traction and braking forces to the contact patch, contribute to directional stability, and also help to absorb shocks. If these components can provide information related to the tire–road interaction, vehicle safety can [...] Read more.
Tires are essential components of vehicles and are able to transmit traction and braking forces to the contact patch, contribute to directional stability, and also help to absorb shocks. If these components can provide information related to the tire–road interaction, vehicle safety can be increased. This research is focused on developing the tire as an active sensor capable to provide its functional parameters. Therefore, in this work, we studied strain-based measurements on the contact patch to develop an algorithm to compute the wheel velocity at the contact point, the effective rolling radius and the contact length on dynamic situations. These parameters directly influence the dynamics of wheel behavior which nowadays is not clearly defined. Herein, hypotheses have been assumed based on previous studies to develop the algorithm. The results expose to view an experimental test regarding influence of the tire operational condition (slip angle, vertical load, and rolling velocity) onto the computed parameters. This information is used to feed a fuzzy logic system capable of estimating the effective radius and contact length. Furthermore, a verification process has been carried out using CarSim simulation software to get the inputs for the fuzzy logic system at complex maneuvers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors in Experimental Mechanics)
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Open AccessArticle
Heat Source Forecast of Ball Screw Drive System Under Actual Working Conditions Based on On-Line Measurement of Temperature Sensors
Sensors 2019, 19(21), 4694; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19214694 - 29 Oct 2019
Abstract
In view of the time-varying complexity of the heat source for the ball screw feed system, this paper proposes an adaptive inverse problem-solving method to estimate the time-varying heat source and temperature field of the feed system under working conditions. The feed system [...] Read more.
In view of the time-varying complexity of the heat source for the ball screw feed system, this paper proposes an adaptive inverse problem-solving method to estimate the time-varying heat source and temperature field of the feed system under working conditions. The feed system includes multiple heat sources, and the rapid change of the moving heat source increases the difficulty of its identification. This paper attempts to develop a numerical calculation method for identifying the heat source by combining the experiment with the optimization algorithm. Firstly, based on the theory of heat transfer, a new dynamic thermal network model was proposed. The temperature data signal and the position signal of the moving nut captured by the sensors are used as input to optimize the solution of the time-varying heat source. Then, based on the data obtained from the experiment, finite element software parametric programming was used to optimize the estimate of the heat source, and the results of the two heat source prediction methods are compared and verified. The other measured temperature points obtained by the experiment were used to compare and verify the inverse method of this numerical calculation, which illustrates the reliability and advantages of the dynamic thermal network combined with the genetic algorithm for the inverse method. The method based on the on-line monitoring of temperature sensors proposed in this paper has a strong application value for heat source and temperature field estimation of complex mechanical structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors in Experimental Mechanics)
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Open AccessArticle
A Hybrid Two-Axis Force Sensor for the Mesoscopic Structural Superlubricity Studies
Sensors 2019, 19(15), 3431; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19153431 - 05 Aug 2019
Abstract
Structural superlubricity (SSL) is a state of nearly zero friction and zero wear between two directly contacted solid surfaces. Recently, SSL was achieved in mesoscale and thus opened the SSL technology which promises great applications in Micro-electromechanical Systems (MEMS), sensors, storage technologies, etc. [...] Read more.
Structural superlubricity (SSL) is a state of nearly zero friction and zero wear between two directly contacted solid surfaces. Recently, SSL was achieved in mesoscale and thus opened the SSL technology which promises great applications in Micro-electromechanical Systems (MEMS), sensors, storage technologies, etc. However, load issues in current mesoscale SSL studies are still not clear. The great challenge is to simultaneously measure both the ultralow shear forces and the much larger normal forces, although the widely used frictional force microscopes (FFM) and micro tribometers can satisfy the shear forces and normal forces requirements, respectively. Here we propose a hybrid two-axis force sensor that can well fill the blank between the capabilities of FFM and micro tribometers for the mesoscopic SSL studies. The proposed sensor can afford 1mN normal load with 10 nN lateral resolution. Moreover, the probe of the sensor is designed at the edge of the structure for the convenience of real-time optical observation. Calibrations and preliminary experiments are conducted to validate the performance of the design. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors in Experimental Mechanics)
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