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Advances in Novel Composites and Their Mechanical Properties

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Manufacturing Processes and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021) | Viewed by 9351

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University Carlos III of Madrid, Getafe, 28903 Madrid, Spain
Interests: advanced manufacturing; additive manufacturing; machining of low machinability material; mechanical design; mechanics of polymer materials; post-processing of composite material
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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University Carlos III of Madrid, 30 Avida. de la Universidad, 28911 Leganés, Madrid, Spain
Interests: biocomposites materials; green composites; manufacturing and post-processing; additive manufacturing; machining of nickel-based superalloys

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleague,

An increasingly demanding market for materials optimized to very specific applications has driven a voracious development of them. In particular, the development of new composite materials has undergone vertiginous evolution in recent decades. There is a wide variety available, not only of combinations of materials that form composite materials, but also of new designs, structures and manufacturing processes.

Research is needed to cover these advances for a better understanding of all actors who play an important role in the mechanical properties of such materials. The aim of this Special Issue is to highlight recent advancements related to new composite materials, designs, manufacturing processing and postprocessing technics, along with their mechanical properties.

We encourage analytical, numerical and application studies to be submitted to this Special Issue. The main topics of this Special Issue may cover but not be limited to the following topics:

  • dynamic and static behavior of materials;
  • composite and multifunctional materials;
  • biocomposites;
  • dynamic fracture mechanics;
  • fatigue;
  • mechanical instabilities;
  • composite manufacturing pre-processing, processing and post-processing.

Dr. Jose Díaz-Álvarez
Dr. Antonio Díaz-Álvarez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • composite materials
  • biocomposite materials
  • mechanical properties
  • processing of composite materials
  • damage tolerances

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 6175 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Undercooling ΔT on the Structure and Tensile Strength of Grey Cast Iron
by Józef Dorula, Dariusz Kopyciński, Edward Guzik, Andrzej Szczęsny and Daniel Gurgul
Materials 2021, 14(21), 6682; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14216682 - 5 Nov 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1604
Abstract
Inoculation of cast iron has become a commonly used metallurgical process, which is carried out in a foundry in order to improve the mechanical properties of utility alloys. It consists in changing the physicochemical state of the melted alloy. This change is caused [...] Read more.
Inoculation of cast iron has become a commonly used metallurgical process, which is carried out in a foundry in order to improve the mechanical properties of utility alloys. It consists in changing the physicochemical state of the melted alloy. This change is caused by the introduction of cast iron with a low ability to nucleate graphite, shortly before pouring a small mass of the substance—an inoculant that increases the number of active nuclei. It is also justified that the literature often connects an increase in the tensile strength UTS of the inoculated grey cast iron, with changes in the characteristics of the particles of graphite. However, in strongly hypoeutectic cast iron, in which a large number of primary austenite grains crystallize, the interdendritic distribution of graphite is usually the result. It also follows that the nature of the graphite precipitates is determined by the mutual relations between the interfacial distances in eutectic grains and the interdendritic distances in the grains of primary austenite occurring in the Fe–C alloys. The article presents the influence of the inoculant on the characteristics of the precipitation of primary austenite grains in relation to the sulphur content in grey cast iron with flake graphite. The study also showed that primary grains in grey cast iron have a great influence on mechanical properties, such as the tensile strength UTS. In this case, the key is to know the value of the degree of undercooling ΔT. The type of inoculant used affects the ΔT value. The study related the number of N primary austenite grains with the degree of undercooling ΔT and the tensile strength UTS with the number of primary austenite N grains. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Novel Composites and Their Mechanical Properties)
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25 pages, 12394 KiB  
Article
Thermomechanical Behaviour and Interface of Overmoulded Soft Thermoplastic Vulcanizate Elastomers
by Pierre Le Mouellic, Sylvain Charlès, Jean-Benoît Le Cam, Nicolas Boyard, Jean-Luc Bailleul, Thierry Gaudry and Jean-Marc Veillé
Materials 2021, 14(19), 5704; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14195704 - 30 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1834
Abstract
The influence of melt injection temperature on the thermomechanical behaviour of soft–soft overmoulded vulcanized thermoplastic elastomers (TPV) with different elastic properties was studied. Samples with two different overmoulding temperatures were tested under uniaxial loading conditions. The full deformation and temperature fields in each [...] Read more.
The influence of melt injection temperature on the thermomechanical behaviour of soft–soft overmoulded vulcanized thermoplastic elastomers (TPV) with different elastic properties was studied. Samples with two different overmoulding temperatures were tested under uniaxial loading conditions. The full deformation and temperature fields in each TPV were determined using digital image correlation technique and infrared thermography, respectively. The maximum interface strength was found to be equal to 70N for a maximum injection temperature of 260C, which is consistent with the fact that high temperatures promote interdiffusion between the molten TPV and the TPV insert. The two TPV have different stiffness, leading to a significant change of the interface position along the specimens during stretching and to a significant necking in the softer material. The zone of influence of the interface in terms of stretch gradient is very different in size from one TPV to the other. In addition, thermal investigations have shown that the elasticity of the two TPV is due to both entropic and non-entropic effects, the former being the most significant at large strains. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Novel Composites and Their Mechanical Properties)
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10 pages, 4009 KiB  
Article
Influence of Solution Treatment Time on Precipitation Behavior and Mechanical Properties of Mg-2.0Nd-2.0Sm-0.4Zn-0.4Zr Alloy
by Tao Ma, Sicong Zhao, Liping Wang, Zhiwei Wang, Erjun Guo, Yicheng Feng and Jingfang Li
Materials 2021, 14(17), 5037; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14175037 - 3 Sep 2021
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 1505
Abstract
The effect of solution treatment time on the microstructure and mechanical properties of aged the Mg-2.0Nd-2.0Sm-0.4Zn-0.4Zr (wt.%) alloy were investigated to give full play to the performance of the alloy. As the solution treatment time increased from 2 h to 12 h at [...] Read more.
The effect of solution treatment time on the microstructure and mechanical properties of aged the Mg-2.0Nd-2.0Sm-0.4Zn-0.4Zr (wt.%) alloy were investigated to give full play to the performance of the alloy. As the solution treatment time increased from 2 h to 12 h at 788 K, the grain size of the solution-treated alloy significantly increased, and the network-like β-Mg12(Nd, Sm, Zn) phase gradually dissolved into the α-Mg matrix. It should be noted that no obvious residual β phase can be observed when the solution treatment time was more than 8 h. After the solution-treated alloy was further aged at 473 K for 18 h, a large number of nanoscale precipitates were observed in the α-Mg matrix. The solution treatment time was 2 h, the α-Mg matrix mainly consisted of spherical-shaped and basal plate-shaped precipitates. Upon the increase of solution treatment time to 8 h, the key strengthening phases transformed from spherical-shaped precipitates and basal plate-shaped precipitates to prismatic plate-shaped β′ precipitates. The orientation relationship between β′ precipitates and α-Mg matrix was (1¯10)β // (11¯00)α and [112]β // the [224¯3]α. Further increasing of solution treatment time from 8 h to 12 h, the key strengthening phases mainly were still β′ precipitates. The solution treatment of aged alloy was carried out at 788 K for 8 h, which achieved optimal ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of 261 ± 4.1 MPa, yield strength (YS) of 154 ± 1.5 MPa, and elongation of 5.8 ± 0.1%, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Novel Composites and Their Mechanical Properties)
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24 pages, 12790 KiB  
Article
Effect of Initial Microstructure on the Toughness of Coarse-Grained Heat-Affected Zone in a Microalloyed Steel
by Minghao Shi, Man Di, Jian Zhang, Rangasayee Kannan, Jing Li, Xiaoguang Yuan and Leijun Li
Materials 2021, 14(16), 4760; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14164760 - 23 Aug 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1902
Abstract
Toughness of the coarse-grained-heat-affected-zone (CGHAZ) strongly depends on the prior austenite grain size. The prior austenite grain size is affected not only by chemical composition, thermal cycle, and dissolution of second-phase particles, but also by the initial microstructure. The effect of base metal [...] Read more.
Toughness of the coarse-grained-heat-affected-zone (CGHAZ) strongly depends on the prior austenite grain size. The prior austenite grain size is affected not only by chemical composition, thermal cycle, and dissolution of second-phase particles, but also by the initial microstructure. The effect of base metal microstructure (ferrite/pearlite obtained by air cooling and martensite obtained by water-quenching) on Charpy impact toughness of the CGHAZ has been investigated for different heat inputs for high-heat input welding of a microalloyed steel. A welding thermal cycle with a heat input of 100 kJ/cm and 400 kJ/cm were simulated on the MMS-300 system. Despite a similar microstructure in the CGHAZ of both the base metals, the average Charpy impact energy for the air-cooled base metal was found to be higher than the water-quenched base metal. Through thermo-kinetic simulations, it was found that a higher enrichment of Mn/C at the ferrite/austenite transformation interface of the CGHAZ of water-quenched base metal resulted in stabilizing austenite at a lower A1 temperature, which resulted in a coarser austenite grain size and eventually lowering the toughness of the CGHAZ. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Novel Composites and Their Mechanical Properties)
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9 pages, 1902 KiB  
Article
Facile Synthesis of Uniform Mesoporous Nb2O5 Micro-Flowers for Enhancing Photodegradation of Methyl Orange
by Jian-Ping Qiu, Huan-Qing Xie, Ya-Hao Wang, Lan Yu, Fang-Yuan Wang, Han-Song Chen, Zheng-Xin Fei, Chao-Qun Bian, Hui Mao and Jia-Biao Lian
Materials 2021, 14(14), 3783; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14143783 - 6 Jul 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1913
Abstract
The removal of organic pollutants using green environmental photocatalytic degradation techniques urgently need high-performance catalysts. In this work, a facile one-step hydrothermal technique has been successfully applied to synthesize a Nb2O5 photocatalyst with uniform micro-flower structure for the degradation of [...] Read more.
The removal of organic pollutants using green environmental photocatalytic degradation techniques urgently need high-performance catalysts. In this work, a facile one-step hydrothermal technique has been successfully applied to synthesize a Nb2O5 photocatalyst with uniform micro-flower structure for the degradation of methyl orange (MO) under UV irradiation. These nanocatalysts are characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopies (TEM and SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) method, and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). It is found that the prepared Nb2O5 micro-flowers presents a good crystal phases and consist of 3D hierarchical nanosheets with 400–500 nm in diameter. The surface area is as large as 48.6 m2 g−1. Importantly, the Nb2O5 micro-flowers exhibit superior catalytic activity up to 99.9% for the photodegradation of MO within 20 mins, which is about 60-fold and 4-fold larger than that of without catalysts (W/O) and commercial TiO2 (P25) sample, respectively. This excellent performance may be attributed to 3D porous structure with abundant catalytic active sites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Novel Composites and Their Mechanical Properties)
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