Special Issue "The Impact of Climate Change on All Areas of Knowledge"

A special issue of Sci (ISSN 2413-4155).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Enedir Ghisi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Department of Civil Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitario, Trindade, Florianópolis - SC, 88040-900, Brazil
Interests: stormwater harvesting; water consumption in buildings; water efficiency; rainwater use in buildings; sustainability; permeable pavements; energy efficiency; buildings; climate change.
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Liseane Padilha Thives
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Paving Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Trindade, Florianópolis - SC, 88040-900, Brazil
Interests: permeable pavements; stormwater harvesting; water consumption in buildings; water efficiency; rainwater use in buildings; sustainability; green roads, resilience of road infrastructure, solid waste reused in pavement
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The world is getting warmer due to climate change. Therefore, unprecedented changes in all aspects of society are foreseen. On the other hand, there is uncertainty on how great such impacts will be. To tackle these challenges, this Special Issue aims to publish papers that address the impact of climate change on all areas of knowledge such as, but not limited to:

  • Environment
  • Buildings
  • Road pavements
  • Agriculture
  • Indigenous peoples and local communities
  • Biodiversity
  • Human health
  • Air quality
  • Animals
  • Water resources
  • Oceans
  • Sustainability
  • Transportation
  • Solid wastes
  • Resilience

Prof. Dr. Enedir Ghisi
Prof. Dr. Liseane Padilha Thives
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sci is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Climate change
  • Environment
  • Buildings
  • Road pavements
  • Agriculture
  • Communities
  • Biodiversity
  • Human health
  • Air quality
  • Animals
  • Water resources
  • Oceans
  • Sustainability
  • Transportation
  • Solid wastes
  • Resilience

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Rainfall and Temperature Trend Analysis by Mann–Kendall Test and Significance for Rainfed Cereal Yields in Northern Togo
Sci 2021, 3(1), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/sci3010017 - 06 Mar 2021
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Abstract
This study investigates the trend in monthly and annual rainfall, minimum and maximum temperature (Tmin and Tmax) using the Mann–Kendall (MK) test and Sen’s slope (SS) method and evaluates the significance of their variability for maize, sorghum and millet yields [...] Read more.
This study investigates the trend in monthly and annual rainfall, minimum and maximum temperature (Tmin and Tmax) using the Mann–Kendall (MK) test and Sen’s slope (SS) method and evaluates the significance of their variability for maize, sorghum and millet yields in northern Togo employing multiple regression analysis. The historical data of Kara, Niamtougou, Mango and Dapaong weather stations from 1977 to 2012 were used. Four non-parametric methods—Alexandersson’s Standard Normal Homogeneity Test (SNHT), Buishand’s Range Test (BRT), Pettitt’s Test (PT) and Von Neumann’s Ratio Test (VNRT)—were applied to detect homogeneity in the data. For the data which were serially correlated, a modified version of the MK test (pre-whitening) was utilised. Results showed an increasing trend in the annual rainfall in all four locations. However, this trend was only significant at Dapaong (p < 0.1). There was an increasing trend in Tmax at Kara, Mango and Niamtougou, unlike Dapaong where Tmax revealed a significant decreasing trend (p < 0.01). Similarly, there was an increasing trend in Tmin at Kara, Mango and Dapaong, unlike Niamtougou where Tmin showed a non-significant decreasing trend (p > 0.05). Rainfall in Dapaong was found to have increased (7.79 mm/year) more than the other locations such as Kara (2.20 mm/year), Niamtougou (4.57 mm/year) and Mango (0.67 mm). Tmax increased by 0.13, 0.13 and 0.32 °C per decade at Kara, Niamtougou and Mango, respectively, and decreased by 0.20 per decade in Dapaong. Likewise, Tmin increased by 0.07, 0.20 and 0.02 °C per decade at Kara, Mango and Dapaong, respectively, and decreased by 0.01 °C per decade at Niamtougou. Results of multiple regression analysis revealed nonlinear yield responses to changes in rainfall and temperature. Rainfall and temperature variability affects rainfed cereal crops production, but the effects vary across crops. The temperature has a positive effect on maize yield in Kara, Niamtougou and Mango but a negative effect on sorghum in Niamtougou and millet in Dapaong, while rainfall has a negative effect on maize yield in Niamtougou and Dapaong and millet yield in Mango. In all locations, rainfall and temperature variability has a significant effect on the cereal crop yields. There is, therefore, a need to adopt some adaptation strategies for sustainable agricultural production in northern Togo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Impact of Climate Change on All Areas of Knowledge)
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Review

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Review
Permeable Pavements as a Means to Save Water in Buildings: State of the Art in Brazil
Sci 2021, 3(4), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/sci3040036 - 14 Oct 2021
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Abstract
Permeable pavements have been the subject of numerous studies in recent decades. The possibility of dissipating stormwater more smoothly and generating numerous benefits to the environment and users makes the use of permeable pavements an excellent possibility of integration into sustainable and resilient [...] Read more.
Permeable pavements have been the subject of numerous studies in recent decades. The possibility of dissipating stormwater more smoothly and generating numerous benefits to the environment and users makes the use of permeable pavements an excellent possibility of integration into sustainable and resilient water management systems in cities. In Brazil, numerous studies on the quantity and quality of infiltrated water, permeability of the coating, clogging, environmental burden, and feasibility, among other characteristics, have been researched. Within this theme, the Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC) has contributed with ten papers in the research of permeable pavements in the last six years, which address various topics about the effectiveness and applicability of permeable pavements. This paper reviews the studies conducted at UFSC on permeable pavements and discusses the different results within the main issues found. In general, the selected documents addressed seven themes in the studies: potential for potable water savings, clogging, quantity and quality of the water infiltrated into the pavement, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and its variants, and hydraulic and structural design details. More specifically, many selected papers assess the potential use of stormwater harvested through permeable pavements in non-potable uses of buildings. The possibility of aligning the benefits of green infrastructure with the rational use of water expands the advantages of the system and can help prevent future water scarcity, as well as reduce the environmental impacts of paving. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Impact of Climate Change on All Areas of Knowledge)
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