Special Issue "New Trends in High Resolution Imagery Processing"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Remote Sensing Image Processing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Francesca Giannone
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Niccolò Cusano University, Rome, Italy
Interests: HRSI; photogrammetry; historical cartography; GIS; GNSS
Dr. Valerio Baiocchi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile Edile e Ambientale, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Roma, Italy
Interests: geomatics; remote sensing; GPS
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last twenty years, the exponential diffusion of high-resolution (HR) and very-high-resolution (VHR) satellite, UAV and terrestrial images and the advances in open and close source software and algorithms have stimulated methodological research in this field.

High-resolution satellite imagery (HRSI) became available in 1999 with the launch of IKONOS, the first civil satellite offering a spatial resolution of 1 m for panchromatic images. Since then other high-resolution satellite platforms have been launched with on board technologically advanced sensors that acquire panchromatic and multispectral images with, respectively, sub-metric and metric resolution. In addition, satellite with stereo and tri-stereo capabilities have been implemented to satisfy the increasing need for higher accuracy and larger area coverage for digital model production. Subsequently, the miniaturization of navigation systems has allowed the great diffusion of drones with photogrammetric capabilities.

These recent advances in sensor technology and algorithm development enable the use of HR remote sensing imagery for development of various product as DTM/DEM and DSM, orthophoto and orthophotomosaics, three-dimensional photogrammetric models. The application fields are increasingly developing from landslide and landfill monitoring to archaeological applications, monitoring an active volcanic area, morphological studies and so on.

Independently of application, each product must be validated in order to define the metric level of precision and accuracy. In fact, high and very-high resolution images are affected by deformation mainly due to camera distortions and acquisition geometry, then they must undergo a geometric rectification process in order to be used for metrical purposes.

This Special Issue aims at collecting new developments, methodologies and applications of high and very high-resolution data for remote sensing. We welcome submissions which provide the community with the most recent advancements on all aspects of satellite remote sensing, including but not limited to:

  • Geometric processing (orientation, orthorectification)
  • Geometric quality assessment
  • DSM/DEM/DTM extraction and validation
  • New open-source solutions for high resolution imagery processing
  • Application with multiresolution and multiplatform data
  • New approaches for precision and accuracy assessment
  • Improvements of existing methods for precision and accuracy assessment
  • Monitoring an active volcanic area
  • Landslide and landfill monitoring
  • Archaeological applications
  • New sensors on mobile device (High resolution camera,GNSS and Lidar)
Dr. Francesca Giannone
Dr. Valerio Baiocchi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Orthorectification
  • Accuracy assessment
  • DSM/DEM/DTM
  • Tri-stereo pairs
  • High resolution imagery
  • UAV
  • SfM
  • Satellite imagery
  • New sensors on mobile device (High resolution camera,GNSS and Lidar)

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
On the Use of Tri-Stereo Pleiades Images for the Morphometric Measurement of Dolines in the Basaltic Plateau of Azrou (Middle Atlas, Morocco)
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(20), 4087; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13204087 - 13 Oct 2021
Viewed by 371
Abstract
Hundreds of large and deep collapse dolines dot the surface of the Quaternary basaltic plateau of Azrou, in the Middle Atlas of Morocco. In the absence of detailed topographic maps, the morphometric study of such a large number of features requires the use [...] Read more.
Hundreds of large and deep collapse dolines dot the surface of the Quaternary basaltic plateau of Azrou, in the Middle Atlas of Morocco. In the absence of detailed topographic maps, the morphometric study of such a large number of features requires the use of remote sensing techniques. We present the processing, extraction, and validation of depth measurements of 89 dolines using tri-stereo Pleiades images acquired in 2018–2019 (the European Space Agency (ESA) © CNES 2018, distributed by Airbus DS). Satellite image-derived DEMs were field-verified using traditional mapping techniques, which showed a very good agreement between field and remote sensing measures. The high resolution of these tri-stereo images allowed to automatically generate accurate morphometric datasets not only regarding the planimetric parameters of the dolines (diameters, contours, orientation of long axes), but also for what concerns their depth and altimetric profiles. Our study demonstrates the potential of using these types of images on rugged morphologies and for the measurement of steep depressions, where traditional remote sensing techniques may be hindered by shadow zones and blind portions. Tri-stereo images might also be suitable for the measurement of deep and steep depressions (skylights and collapses) on Martian and Lunar lava flows, suitable targets for future planetary cave exploration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in High Resolution Imagery Processing)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Automation of Pan-Sharpening Methods for Pléiades Images Using GIS Basic Functions
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(8), 1550; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13081550 - 16 Apr 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 702
Abstract
Pan-sharpening methods allow the transfer of higher resolution panchromatic images to multispectral ones concerning the same scene. Different approaches are available in the literature, and only a part of these approaches is included in remote sensing software for automatic application. In addition, the [...] Read more.
Pan-sharpening methods allow the transfer of higher resolution panchromatic images to multispectral ones concerning the same scene. Different approaches are available in the literature, and only a part of these approaches is included in remote sensing software for automatic application. In addition, the quality of the results supplied by a specific method varies according to the characteristics of the scene; for consequence, different algorithms must be compared to find the best performing one. Nevertheless, pan-sharpening methods can be applied using GIS basic functions in the absence of specific pan-sharpening tools, but this operation is expensive and time-consuming. This paper aims to explain the approach implemented in Quantum GIS (QGIS) for automatic pan-sharpening of Pléiades images. The experiments are carried out on data concerning the Greek island named Lesbo. In total, 14 different pan-sharpening methods are applied to reduce pixel dimensions of the four multispectral bands from 2 m to 0.5 m. The automatic procedure involves basic functions already included in GIS software; it also permits the evaluation of the quality of the resulting images supplying the values of appropriate indices. The results demonstrate that the approach provides the user with the highest performing method every time, so the best possible fused products are obtained with minimal effort in a reduced timeframe. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in High Resolution Imagery Processing)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Object-Based Predictive Modeling (OBPM) for Archaeology: Finding Control Places in Mountainous Environments
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(6), 1197; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13061197 - 21 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 734
Abstract
This contribution examines the potential of object-based image analysis (OBIA) for archaeological predictive modeling starting from elevation data, by testing a ruleset for the location of “control places” on two test areas in the Alpine environment (northern Italy). The ruleset was developed on [...] Read more.
This contribution examines the potential of object-based image analysis (OBIA) for archaeological predictive modeling starting from elevation data, by testing a ruleset for the location of “control places” on two test areas in the Alpine environment (northern Italy). The ruleset was developed on the western Asiago Plateau (Vicenza Province, Veneto) and subsequently re-applied (semi)automatically in the Isarco Valley (South Tirol). Firstly, we considered the physiographic, climatic, and morphological characteristics of the selected areas and we applied 3 DTM processing techniques: Slope, local dominance, and solar radiation. Subsequently, we employed an object-based approach to classification. Solar radiation, local dominance, and slope were visualized as a three-layer RGB image that was segmented with the multiresolution algorithm. The classification was implemented with a ruleset that selected only image–objects with high local dominance and solar radiation, but low slope, which were considered more suitable parameters for human occupation. The classification returned five areas on the Asiago Plateau that were remotely and ground controlled, confirming anthropic exploitation covering a time span from protohistory (2nd-1st millennium BC) to the First World War. Subsequently, the same model was applied to the Isarco Valley to verify the replicability of the method. The procedure resulted in 36 potential control places which find good correspondence with the archaeological sites discovered in the area. Previously unknown contexts were further controlled using very high-resolution (VHR) aerial images and digital terrain model (DTM) data, which often suggested a possible (pre-proto)historic human frequentation. The outcomes of the analysis proved the feasibility of the approach, which can be exported and applied to similar mountainous landscapes for site predictivity analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in High Resolution Imagery Processing)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Integrated Geomatic Techniques for Georeferencing and Reconstructing the Position of Underground Archaeological Sites: The Case Study of the Augustus Sundial (Rome)
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(24), 4064; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12244064 - 11 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 665
Abstract
A large part of the archaeological remains still to be discovered and excavated are not in remote and depopulated areas of the earth but are often beneath urban centres that have buried them with centuries of debris and later constructions. Excavating in these [...] Read more.
A large part of the archaeological remains still to be discovered and excavated are not in remote and depopulated areas of the earth but are often beneath urban centres that have buried them with centuries of debris and later constructions. Excavating in these contexts is much more complex than digging in rural or sparsely inhabited areas because of the constraints imposed by existing buildings and infrastructure. It should also be considered that within an urbanised area, any archaeological remains are concentrated in the subsoil of the historic centre, which is, therefore, often surmounted by buildings that are more recent than the remains but historical as well, and thus, of considerable value and vulnerability. For this reason, an archaeological excavation in an urban area must be preceded by a real feasibility study, where the potential risks for the structures above are minimised and accurately quantified. In many situations, as in the case under study, the discovery of a small segment of a structure is the only clue to reconstruct the development of the remaining part still to be excavated, which may stretch tens or hundreds of metres away from the measurable part. As a consequence, an error of a few centimetres in the survey of the excavated part can lead to errors of metres in estimating the positions of the far parts still to be excavated, and this, in many cases, as in the one under study, must absolutely be avoided. In practice, high-precision geomatic surveys, in support of the archaeological and historical interpretation of the observable structures, will help to establish the exact locations to possibly continue the excavations, helping the accurate planning of the excavation itself. Here, we have shown how the various techniques, compared to each other, have made it possible to reconstruct the location of a short stretch (less than 7 m) of the Emperor Augustus’ Sundial, the only currently visible evidence of a scientific instrument of imposing dimensions (tens of metres in length and height) that served to define some of the characteristics of the calendar that we still use today. The portion of the sundial currently observable, according to the most reliable hypotheses, is located approximately at one end of a structure and extends for several tens of metres. The accurate positioning of the observable parts in a geodetic reference system will enable to identify with certainty the possible areas in which excavation may continue and will also allow to accurately reconstruct the principle of operation of the sundial through an approach that could be defined as “reverse engineering” of the scientific instrument itself. The aim of this work is to study and thus define the combination and integration of existing geomatic techniques for this specific field of application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in High Resolution Imagery Processing)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop