Special Issue "Advances in Retrieval, Operationalization, Monitoring and Application of Sea Surface Temperature II"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2022 | Viewed by 2230

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jorge Vazquez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA
Interests: applying high resolution remote sensing data to coastal studies; validation of satellite derived sea surface temperature data sets; development and analysis of climate data records statistical modeling of remote sensing data; improvement in quality of sea surface temperature data records
Dr. Eileen Maturi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
NOAA/NESDIS/STAR Center for Satellite Applications and Research, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD 20740, USA
Interests: remote sensing; sea surface temperature

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues

Sea Surface Temperature (SST) products derived from satellites are constantly being improved.

This leads to advances in their use for research and applications. Many products are available operationally in near real time, which allows for monitoring of Marine Heat Waves and impacts on biodiversity. Improvements in cloud masking and resolution have led to further advances  in applications to coastal regions.

We are looking for manuscripts that focus on how advances in retrieval algorithms have increased the use of SST products. Specific examples would be advances in retrieval algorithms that have enhanced the operationalization of the products and their use for monitoring the world’s oceans. Manuscripts that detail the advances in the SST product and how they are related to the application/monitoring/operationlization are very much encouraged.

Dr. Jorge Vazquez
Dr. Eileen Maturi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sea surface temperature (SST) retrieval algorithm
  • SST operational production
  • Marine heat waves monitoring
  • temperature anomaly effects on marine biodiversity
  • cloud detection
  • validation, monitoring and error characterization of SST

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Multi-Sensor Sea Surface Temperature Products from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology
Remote Sens. 2022, 14(15), 3785; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs14153785 - 06 Aug 2022
Viewed by 270
Abstract
Sea surface temperature (SST) products that can resolve fine scale features, such as sub-mesoscale eddies, ocean fronts and coastal upwelling, are increasingly in demand. In response to user requirements for gap-free, highest spatial resolution, best quality and highest accuracy SST data, the Australian [...] Read more.
Sea surface temperature (SST) products that can resolve fine scale features, such as sub-mesoscale eddies, ocean fronts and coastal upwelling, are increasingly in demand. In response to user requirements for gap-free, highest spatial resolution, best quality and highest accuracy SST data, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) produces operational, real-time Multi-sensor SST level 3 products by compositing SST from Advanced Very-High-Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensors on Meteorological Operational satellite (MetOp)-B and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 18, along with SST from Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensors on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) and NOAA 20 polar-orbiting satellites for the Australian Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) project. Here we discuss our method to combine data from different sensors and present validation of the satellite-derived SST against in situ SST data. The Multi-sensor Level 3 Super Collated (L3S) SSTs exhibit significantly greater spatial coverage and improved accuracy compared with the pre-existing IMOS AVHRR-only L3S SSTs. When compared to the Geo Polar Blended level 4 analysis SST data over the Great Barrier Reef, Multi-sensor L3S SST differs by less than 1 °C while exhibiting a wider range of SSTs over the region. It shows more variability and restores small-scale features better than the Geo Polar Blended level 4 analysis SST data. The operational Multi-sensor L3S SST products are used as input for applications such as IMOS OceanCurrent and the BoM ReefTemp Next-Generation Coral Bleaching Nowcasting service and provide useful insight into the study of marine heatwaves and ocean upwelling in near-coastal regions. Full article
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Article
Sea Surface Temperature Variability and Marine Heatwaves in the Black Sea
Remote Sens. 2022, 14(10), 2383; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs14102383 - 16 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1018
Abstract
Marine heatwaves (MHWs) have recently been at the forefront of climate research due to their devastating impacts on the marine environment. In this study, we have evaluated the spatiotemporal variability and trends of sea surface temperature (SST) and MHWs in the Black Sea. [...] Read more.
Marine heatwaves (MHWs) have recently been at the forefront of climate research due to their devastating impacts on the marine environment. In this study, we have evaluated the spatiotemporal variability and trends of sea surface temperature (SST) and MHWs in the Black Sea. Furthermore, we investigated the relationship between the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and MHW frequency. This is the first attempt to investigate MHWs and their characteristics in the Black Sea using high-resolution remote-sensing daily satellite SST data (0.05° × 0.05°) from 1982 to 2020. The results showed that the spatial average of the SST warming rate over the entire basin was about 0.65 ± 0.07 °C/decade. Empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis revealed that SST in the Black Sea exhibited inter-annual spatiotemporal coherent variability. The maximum spatial SST variability was discovered in the central Black Sea, whereas the lowest variability was in the Batumi and Caucasus anti-cyclonic eddies in the eastern Black Sea. The highest SST temporal variability was found in 1994. More than two-thirds of all MHW events were recorded in the last decade (2010–2020). The highest annual MHW durations were reported in 1994 and 2020. The highest MHW frequency was detected in 2018 (7 waves). Over the whole study period (1982–2020), a statistically significant increase in annual MHW frequency and duration was detected, with trends of 1.4 ± 0.3 waves/decade and 2.8 ± 1.3 days/decade, respectively. A high number of MHW events coincided with El Niño (e.g., 1996, 1999, 2007, 2010, 2018, and 2020). A strong correlation (R = 0.90) was observed between the annual mean SST and the annual MHW frequency, indicating that more MHWs can be expected in the Black Sea, with serious consequences for the marine ecosystem. Full article
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Article
Sea Surface Skin Temperature Retrieval from FY-3C/VIRR
Remote Sens. 2022, 14(6), 1451; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs14061451 - 17 Mar 2022
Viewed by 558
Abstract
The visible and infrared scanning radiometer (VIRR) onboard the Fengyun-3C (FY-3C) meteorological satellite has 11 μm and 12 μm channels, which are capable of sea surface temperature (SST) observations. This study is based on atmospheric radiative transfer modeling (RTM) by applying Bayesian cloud [...] Read more.
The visible and infrared scanning radiometer (VIRR) onboard the Fengyun-3C (FY-3C) meteorological satellite has 11 μm and 12 μm channels, which are capable of sea surface temperature (SST) observations. This study is based on atmospheric radiative transfer modeling (RTM) by applying Bayesian cloud detection theory and optimal estimation (OE) to obtain sea surface skin temperature (SSTskin) from VIRR in the Northwest Pacific. The inter-calibration of FY-3C/VIRR 11 μm and 12 μm brightness temperature (BT) is carried out using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) as the reference sensor. Bayesian cloud detection and OE SST retrieval with the calibration BT data is performed to obtain SSTskin. The SSTskin retrievals are compared with the buoy SST with a temporal window of 1 h and a spatial window of 0.01°. The bias is −0.12 °C, and the standard deviation is 0.52 °C. Comparisons of the retrieved SSTskin with the AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) SSTskin from European Space Agency Sea Surface Temperature Climate Change Initiative (ESA SST CCI) project show the bias of 0.08 °C and the standard deviation of 0.55 °C. The results indicate that the VIRR SSTskin are consistent with AVHRR SSTskin and buoy SST. Full article
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