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Atmospheric Pollen/Fungus Remote Sensing

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Atmospheric Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2019) | Viewed by 8360

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
CommSensLab, Dept. of Signal Theory and Communications, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08034 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: optical remote sensing; remote sensing; lidar; optics; aerosols; mineral dust; pollen; aerosol-cloud interactions; radiative forcing; shortwave; longwave; satellite sensors; transport modeling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Institut de Ciència i Tecnologia Ambientals, ICTA-UAB and Botany Unit, Department of Animal Biology, Plant Biology and Ecology C Building, C1-219 Office, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona 08193 Bellaterra (Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona), Spain
Interests: aerobiology; pollen; fungal spores; allergens; allergies; atmospheric transport; climate change; public health; phytopathology

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Guest Editor
Finnish Meteorological Institute, Atmospheric Composition Research, Erik Palminen Aukio 1, 00560 Helsinki, Finland
Interests: model development; verification and comparison with measurements; data assimilation; statistical methodology for model validation; analysis of the measurement data; inverse and adjoint dispersion modeling; computer experiments
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biogenic aerosols play a vital yet poorly understood role in the physical processes of the atmosphere, interactions with clouds, and climate forcing. Pollen and fungus allergenicity has adverse effects on human health and wellness. The transport of biogenic aerosols facilitates gene dispersion and can prove to be a significant factor in vegetation adaptation to climate change. It is thus of great public and scientific interest to increase our knowledge of bioaerosol behaviour in the atmosphere (sources, emissions, the processes involved during transport, etc.). This Special Issue of Remote Sensing on atmospheric bioaerosols should address all topics related to their detection in the atmosphere (from the surface up into the atmospheric column) in order to improve our understanding of the release and dispersion of these aerosol types. Transport and forecast modelling exercises of their dispersion on local and/or large scales, including observations, are also appropriate.

Dr. Michaël Sicard
Dr. Jordina Belmonte
Prof. Mikhail Sofiev
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Remote sensing
  • Airborne Pollen And Fungi
  • Atmospheric Release
  • Atmospheric Dispersion
  • Forecast
  • Transport

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

29 pages, 10607 KiB  
Article
Variability and Geographical Origin of Five Years Airborne Fungal Spore Concentrations Measured at Saclay, France from 2014 to 2018
by Roland Sarda-Estève, Dominique Baisnée, Benjamin Guinot, John Sodeau, David O’Connor, Jordina Belmonte, Jean-Pierre Besancenot, Jean-Eudes Petit, Michel Thibaudon, Gilles Oliver, Charlotte Sindt and Valérie Gros
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(14), 1671; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11141671 - 13 Jul 2019
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3545
Abstract
Airborne fungal spores (AFS) represent the major fraction of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs), and they are studied worldwide largely due to their important role within the Earth system. They have an impact on climate and human health, and they contribute to the [...] Read more.
Airborne fungal spores (AFS) represent the major fraction of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs), and they are studied worldwide largely due to their important role within the Earth system. They have an impact on climate and human health, and they contribute to the propagation of diseases. As their presence in the air depends largely on studied ecosystems, a spore trap was used to monitor their atmospheric concentrations from 2014 to December 2018 in Saclay, a suburban area in the megacity of Paris. The main objective of this work was: (1) to understand the atmospheric variability of AFS in relation to different variables such as meteorological factors, agricultural practice, and (2) to identify their geographical origin by using a source receptor model. During our period of observation, 30 taxa have been identified under a light microscope. In order of importance, Ascospores, Cladosporium, Basidiospores, Tilletiopsis, Alternaria were found to be the most abundant types respectively (50.8%, 33.6%, 7.6%, 1.8%, and 1.3%) accounting for 95% of the atmospheric concentrations. We observed a general decrease associated with a strong interannual variability. A bimodal seasonal cycle was identified with a first maximum in July and a second in October. The main parameters driving the atmospheric concentration are temperature and precipitation. The daily variability is strongly activated by successive periods of hot weather and rainfall, multiplying the concentration by a factor of 1000 in less than 12 hours. Results from the source receptor model ZeFir point out unambiguous different origins of AFS due to specific sources impacting the observation site. Our study also indicated that a hydrological stress has a direct effect on the daily concentrations. This last point should be taken into account for every stressed ecosystem studied in a global warming context. This is particularly important for Mediterranean areas where water is a key control of the growth and dispersion of fungal spores. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Pollen/Fungus Remote Sensing)
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23 pages, 12440 KiB  
Article
Temporal Variability and Geographical Origins of Airborne Pollen Grains Concentrations from 2015 to 2018 at Saclay, France
by Roland Sarda Estève, Dominique Baisnée, Benjamin Guinot, Jean-Eudes Petit, John Sodeau, David O’Connor, Jean-Pierre Besancenot, Michel Thibaudon and Valérie Gros
Remote Sens. 2018, 10(12), 1932; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs10121932 - 1 Dec 2018
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3800
Abstract
The study of the origin and dispersion processes associated with airborne pollen grains are important to understand due to their impacts on health. In this context, a Hirst-type spore trap was utilized over the period 2015–2018 to monitor ambient pollen grains at Saclay, [...] Read more.
The study of the origin and dispersion processes associated with airborne pollen grains are important to understand due to their impacts on health. In this context, a Hirst-type spore trap was utilized over the period 2015–2018 to monitor ambient pollen grains at Saclay, France, a receptor site influenced by both clean air masses originating from the Atlantic Ocean and polluted air masses under anticyclonic conditions. The objective of this work was to use ZeFir (a user-friendly, software tool recently-developed to investigate the geographical origin and point sources of atmospheric pollution) as a method to analyse total and allergenic airborne pollen grain concentrations. Strong interannual variability was exhibited for the total pollen grains concentrations and it was determined that this was mainly driven by Betulaceae pollen, with a general increasing trend displayed. The start of the pollen season was seen to be triggered by particular synoptic conditions after a period of dormancy and two maximums were displayed, one in April and a second in June. Results from the ZeFir tool, fed with on-site hourly meteorological and pollen measurements, demonstrate that the dominant pollen grains inputs to Saclay are favoured by non-prevailing winds originating from East and North in association with dry air, moderate winds, mild temperature and enhanced insolation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Pollen/Fungus Remote Sensing)
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