Special Issue "Selected Papers of Microwave and Radar Week (MRW 2020)"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Remote Sensing Image Processing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Konrad Jedrzejewski
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Warsaw University of Technology, 00-661 Warszawa, Poland
Interests: adaptive signal processing; machine learning; radar signal processing; passive radars; analog-to-digital converters
Prof. Adam Abramowicz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Warsaw University of Technology, 00-661 Warszawa, Poland
Interests: microwaves and RF; microwave filters; microwave measurements; electromagnetics
Prof. Dr. Paolo Colantonio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Electronic Engineering Department, University of Roma Tor Vergata, 00133 Roma, Italy
Interests: RF and microwave power amplifiers; linear and nonlinear active microwave components, circuits, and subsystems, including MMICs
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent developments in systems involving remote sensing methods and technologies are reflected in numerous ideas and realizations of high-frequency electronics. Remote sensing, traditionally realized in systems like radars, has received attention fields such as agriculture, IoT, physics, and many others. Contactless sensors—especially those operating at large distances—have become an important part of modern technology.

Microwave and Radar Week (MRW 2020), https://mrw2020.org/, consisting of four conferences related to RF, microwaves, radars, signal processing, and THz frequency techniques, will gather papers reporting the newest advances and scientific results in the realization of RF, microwaves, THz, radar and signal processing devices, systems, and methods—especially those intended for future technology and techniques.

The aim of this Special Issue is to present the latest research results in all areas presented during MRW 2020, especially in the area of widely understood remote sensing and sensors. The contributions from leading experts in these fields of research will be collected and presented in this Special Issue. Topics include, but are not limited to:

  * Microwave and THz radar imaging techniques;

  * RF and microwave components used for remote sensing applications;

  * Target recognition and classification in radar images;

  * SAR and ISAR techniques for remote sensing application;

  * Advances in large distributed systems related to remote sensing;

  * Advances in measurement methods and systems related to remote sensing;

  * Applications of remote sensing;

  * Signal processing for remote sensing.

  * Microwave and wireless technologies and applications,

  * Radar technologies and applications

  * Advances in signal processing and its applications, particularly in radar communications.

 

Prof. Dr. Paolo Colantonio
Prof. Konrad Jedrzejewski
Prof. Adam Abramowicz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Microwave and Radar Week (MRW 2020): Selected Papers
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(9), 1803; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13091803 - 06 May 2021
Viewed by 254
Abstract
The 9th Microwave and Radar Week (MRW 2020) was held in Warsaw the capital of Poland, on 5–7 October 2020 [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers of Microwave and Radar Week (MRW 2020))
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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Beamforming of LOFAR Radio-Telescope for Passive Radiolocation Purposes
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(4), 810; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13040810 - 23 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 362
Abstract
This paper presents the results of investigations on the beamforming of a low-frequency radio-telescope LOFAR which can be used as a receiver in passive coherent location (PCL) radars for aerial and space object detection and tracking. The use of a LOFAR radio-telescope for [...] Read more.
This paper presents the results of investigations on the beamforming of a low-frequency radio-telescope LOFAR which can be used as a receiver in passive coherent location (PCL) radars for aerial and space object detection and tracking. The use of a LOFAR radio-telescope for the passive tracking of space objects can be a highly cost-effective solution due to the fact that most of the necessary equipment needed for passive radiolocation already exists in the form of LOFAR stations. The capability of the radiolocation of planes by a single LOFAR station in Borowiec is considered to be ‘proof of concept’ for future research focused on the localization of space objects. Beam patterns of single sets of LOFAR antennas (known as tiles), as well as for the entire LOFAR station, are presented and thoroughly discussed in the paper. Issues related to grating lobes in LOFAR beam patterns are also highlighted. A beamforming algorithm used for passive radiolocation purposes, exploiting data collected by a LOFAR station, is also discussed. The results of preliminary experiments carried out with real signals collected by the LOFAR station in Borowiec, Poland confirm that the appropriate beamforming can significantly increase the radar’s detection range, as well as the detection’s certainty. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers of Microwave and Radar Week (MRW 2020))
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Open AccessArticle
Type III Radio Bursts Observations on 20th August 2017 and 9th September 2017 with LOFAR Bałdy Telescope
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(1), 148; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13010148 - 05 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 509
Abstract
We present the observations of two type III solar radio events performed with LOFAR (LOw-Frequency ARray) station in Bałdy (PL612), Poland in single mode. The first event occurred on 20th August 2017 and the second one on 9th September 2017. Solar dynamic spectra [...] Read more.
We present the observations of two type III solar radio events performed with LOFAR (LOw-Frequency ARray) station in Bałdy (PL612), Poland in single mode. The first event occurred on 20th August 2017 and the second one on 9th September 2017. Solar dynamic spectra were recorded in the 10 MHz up to 90 MHz frequency band. Together with the wide frequency bandwidth LOFAR telescope (with single station used) provides also high frequency and high sensitivity observations. Additionally to LOFAR observations, the data recorded by instruments on boards of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) in the UV spectral range complement observations in the radio field. Unfortunately, only the radio event from 9th September 2017 was observed by both satellites. Our study shows that the LOFAR single station observations, in combination with observations at other wavelengths can be very useful for better understanding of the environment in which the type III radio events occur. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers of Microwave and Radar Week (MRW 2020))
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Open AccessArticle
Towards Cooperative Global Mapping of the Ionosphere: Fusion Feasibility for IGS and IRI with Global Climate VTEC Maps
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(21), 3531; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12213531 - 28 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 649
Abstract
Recommendations of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) Workshop 2017 in Taoyuan City, Taiwan and International GNSS Service (IGS) Workshop 2018 in Wuhan, China included establishment of an ionosphere mapping service that would fuse measurements from two independent sensor networks: IGS permanent GNSS receivers [...] Read more.
Recommendations of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) Workshop 2017 in Taoyuan City, Taiwan and International GNSS Service (IGS) Workshop 2018 in Wuhan, China included establishment of an ionosphere mapping service that would fuse measurements from two independent sensor networks: IGS permanent GNSS receivers providing the vertical total electron content (VTEC) measurements and ionosondes of the Global Ionosphere Radio Observatory (GIRO) that compute the bottomside vertical profiles of the ionospheric plasma density. Using available GAMBIT software at GIRO, we introduced new VTEC products to its data roster: previously unavailable global average (climate) maps of VTEC and slab thickness based on climatological capabilities of IRI. Incorporation of the VTEC and τ maps into the GAMBIT Explorer environment provided data analysts with nearly 10-year history of the reference average VTEC records and opened access to the GAMBIT toolkit for evaluation and validation of the τ computations. This result is the first step towards establishing an infrastructure and the data workflow to provide GAMBIT users with the low latency and consistent quality and usability of the ionospheric weather-climate specifications. Combination of IGS-provided VTEC and GIRO-provided peak density of F2 layer NmF2 allows ground-based evaluation of the equivalent slab thickness τ, a derived property of the near-Earth plasma that characterizes the skewness of its vertical profile up to the GNSS spacecraft altitudes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers of Microwave and Radar Week (MRW 2020))
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Other

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Open AccessTechnical Note
Errors in Broadband Permittivity Determination Due to Liquid Surface Distortions in Semi-Open Test Cell
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(5), 983; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13050983 - 05 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 381
Abstract
We study how surface distortions of liquid samples due to a meniscus and a tilt of a semi-open coaxial test cell affect errors in a broadband permittivity determination. The study is based on the scattering parameters, obtained using the electromagnetic simulations of samples [...] Read more.
We study how surface distortions of liquid samples due to a meniscus and a tilt of a semi-open coaxial test cell affect errors in a broadband permittivity determination. The study is based on the scattering parameters, obtained using the electromagnetic simulations of samples with flat and distorted surfaces in a broad frequency range up to 18 GHz. The parameters are processed with the classic Nicolson–Ross–Weir (NRW) method and our new meniscus removal technique. We analyze the errors for several samples of different properties, such as distilled water and propan-2-ol. The results show that the meniscus removal technique is more robust and provides smaller errors in the permittivity determination compared to the classic NRW method. The effect of the cell tilt, to our best knowledge, has not been considered in the literature yet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers of Microwave and Radar Week (MRW 2020))
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Open AccessLetter
A Tunable and Electrically Small Antenna for Compact GNSS Receivers
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(3), 485; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13030485 - 29 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 549
Abstract
The electronic receivers of global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs) are implemented in various handheld electronic devices such as laptops, smartphones, and smartwatches; therefore, their dimensions are of critical importance. Achieving a GNSS terminal of a small size is difficult due to its relatively [...] Read more.
The electronic receivers of global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs) are implemented in various handheld electronic devices such as laptops, smartphones, and smartwatches; therefore, their dimensions are of critical importance. Achieving a GNSS terminal of a small size is difficult due to its relatively low operational frequency (L-band), which is equivalent to a wavelength of approximately 24 cm. As an efficient half-wavelength antenna is too large for compact devices, in this paper, an electrically small antenna (ESA) for GNSS terminals is presented. The antenna was miniaturized by using a dielectric block with relatively high permittivity, making some parts virtual, and optimizing its geometry. The operational frequency of the ESA is tunable by means of metallic rods of variable heights inserted into a cylindrical cavity drilled inside the dielectric block. The results confirm the feasibility of the concept and the usability of the ESA for compact GNSS terminals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers of Microwave and Radar Week (MRW 2020))
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Open AccessTechnical Note
The Analysis of Experimental Deployment of IGLUNA 2019 Trans-Ice Longwave System
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(24), 4045; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12244045 - 10 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 608
Abstract
An experimental longwave system operating in the broadcasting spectrum with horizontal magnetic loop transmitting antennas is presented as an element of simulated lunar astronaut mission of the IGLUNA program of Swiss Space Center (ESA_Lab demonstrator) in June 2019 on the Klein Matterhorn glacier [...] Read more.
An experimental longwave system operating in the broadcasting spectrum with horizontal magnetic loop transmitting antennas is presented as an element of simulated lunar astronaut mission of the IGLUNA program of Swiss Space Center (ESA_Lab demonstrator) in June 2019 on the Klein Matterhorn glacier in Switzerland. The parameters of the antennas, the environment, the transmitter design, and propagation tests are presented. The best-suited propagation model is developed. As the system, using low powers, provided coverage of maximal distance of 2077.06 km, a single radio station of this type would cover about 36% of the Moon’s surface and allow in situ ground-penetrating research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers of Microwave and Radar Week (MRW 2020))
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